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if I get all the grades necessary, does one of my five uni choices have to accept me. watch

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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Your referee will provide your A-level predictions.

    Are you doing all 3 A-levels in one year after your Access? I'd be concerned about your workload, and you don't need 3 A-levels on top of an Access. One is entirely sufficient, even for Oxford (or Cambridge). Philosophy would be a good choice.

    I do think you should consider taking GCSE maths if you have no maths at all.

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    If I do A level philosophy would I not need to have English GCSE, the only reason I'll be doing English language A levels is because I don't have the GCSE, would philosophy cover that.

    And will my referee at my current college that I'm doing an access in, then give me the predicted grades or do I have to get the predicted grades from the college I'm doing A levels in, and when do I get that, when I finished a mock exam or something?

    I understand what your saying about doing what you need, but if I didn't enjoy it nor found myself capable of doing it, then I wouldn't do it.

    But now that I am going to do it, do you think alongside my Access, it is then best to do A level Philosophy, A level Drama and A level Creative writing, do you think that's a good mix of subjects.

    Thank you soo much
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    (Original post by Efron)
    If I do A level philosophy would I not need to have English GCSE, the only reason I'll be doing English language A levels is because I don't have the GCSE, would philosophy cover that.

    And will my referee at my current college that I'm doing an access in, then give me the predicted grades or do I have to get the predicted grades from the college I'm doing A levels in, and when do I get that, when I finished a mock exam or something?

    I understand what your saying about doing what you need, but if I didn't enjoy it nor found myself capable of doing it, then I wouldn't do it.

    But now that I am going to do it, do you think alongside my Access, it is then best to do A level Philosophy, A level Drama and A level Creative writing, do you think that's a good mix of subjects.

    Thank you soo much
    You would need to check the minimum GCSE requirements with any university you are considering.

    A-level predictions and reference would need to be provided by your A-level college. ButrRemember the application deadine for Oxbridge is 15th Oct which is almost certainly too early for your A-level college to provide a reference given they will only have been teaching you for a month - but you can certainly ask them.

    I don't think Drama or Creative Writing adds anything to your application. You can enjoy drama by joining a drama group, and creative writing by doing writing. You don't need A-levels in them.

    Stay focussed on what will actually help you get where you want to get to.
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    If you receive a firm offer from a university, it will,be conditional/unconditional on results meeting a given criteria.
    Sometimes you get better deal if you agree to firm early
    Should you pass , and achieve the necessary points, any firm offer is a contract

    Universities are independant bodies, with a governing body that adjudicates any disputes so that all uk units meet certain standards, but there isn't an education department controlling recruitment nationally

    Just getting 5A's does not entitle you to a place at any University without them agreeing
    In the same way, having a wallet full of cash does not force a shop to sell you stuff or a hotel to give you a bed

    If a university takes more students than the agreed amount, they do not receive the additional funding.
    That is why they make some unconditional offers and some conditional- to balance the books.
    if they don't receive enough students, they may open more places or not hold the course.
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    (Original post by Efron)
    If I do A level philosophy would I not need to have English GCSE, the only reason I'll be doing English language A levels is because I don't have the GCSE, would philosophy cover that.

    And will my referee at my current college that I'm doing an access in, then give me the predicted grades or do I have to get the predicted grades from the college I'm doing A levels in, and when do I get that, when I finished a mock exam or something?

    I understand what your saying about doing what you need, but if I didn't enjoy it nor found myself capable of doing it, then I wouldn't do it.

    But now that I am going to do it, do you think alongside my Access, it is then best to do A level Philosophy, A level Drama and A level Creative writing, do you think that's a good mix of subjects.

    Thank you soo much
    Following up a level 3 qualification (an Access to HE Diploma) with another level 3 qualification (A levels) is really not ideal unless you think your access diploma has not covered the topics you need for a Law degree (unlikely given that's it's function). You're basically repeating the same level of study but over a broader range of subjects - and Oxford and most other universities are clear that they prefer DEPTH of knowledge over breadth.

    You would be better off getting distinctions across your Access credits and taking up some Open University Level 4 law modules (eg http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/qualif...s/details/w101 plus http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/qualif...s/details/w102 would give you the equivalent of the first year of the OU LLB QLD) alongside sitting GCSE English and Maths - starting as soon as possible after your Access course finishes. You're then applying with the Level 3 requirements for entry completed but with a plan to continue your progress (and back up your qualifications with GCSEs) during the year you're applying.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    Following up a level 3 qualification (an Access to HE Diploma) with another level 3 qualification (A levels) is really not ideal unless you think your access diploma has not covered the topics you need for a Law degree (unlikely given that's it's function). You're basically repeating the same level of study but over a broader range of subjects - and Oxford and most other universities are clear that they prefer DEPTH of knowledge over breadth.

    You would be better off getting distinctions across your Access credits and taking up some Open University Level 4 law modules (eg http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/qualif...s/details/w101 plus http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/qualif...s/details/w102 would give you the equivalent of the first year of the OU LLB QLD) alongside sitting GCSE English and Maths - starting as soon as possible after your Access course finishes. You're then applying with the Level 3 requirements for entry completed but with a plan to continue your progress (and back up your qualifications with GCSEs) during the year you're applying.
    Do these levels 4 modules take a year, and can I then move up to undergraduate degree in law or would they they say that I'm overqualified due to me covering the first year on the subject.
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    (Original post by Efron)
    Do these levels 4 modules take a year, and can I then move up to undergraduate degree in law or would they they say that I'm overqualified due to me covering the first year on the subject.
    As I said earlier, why not apply now to courses that still have places? You said yourself you aren't that interested in the "prestige" of the university (cf Westminster).

    If you get offers and then a place you are a year ahead in your game plan. If you get 5 rejections you haven't lost anything, and you can reapply.

    Edit: Westminster is still open for applications
    https://digital.ucas.com/search/resu...tancePostcode=

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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    As I said earlier, why not apply now to courses that still have places? You said yourself you aren't that interested in the "prestige" of the university (cf Westminster).

    If you get offers and then a place you are a year ahead in your game plan. If you get 5 rejections you haven't lost anything, and you can reapply.

    Edit: Westminster is still open for applications
    https://digital.ucas.com/search/resu...tancePostcode=

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    If I apply for 2019 entry next year and I submit 3 different applications containing 15 different universities with the same subject, (Law) is that allowed through UCAS.
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    (Original post by Efron)
    If I apply for 2019 entry next year and I submit 3 different applications containing 15 different universities with the same subject, (Law) is that allowed through UCAS.
    Sigh.
    No.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    Following up a level 3 qualification (an Access to HE Diploma) with another level 3 qualification (A levels) is really not ideal unless you think your access diploma has not covered the topics you need for a Law degree (unlikely given that's it's function). You're basically repeating the same level of study but over a broader range of subjects - and Oxford and most other universities are clear that they prefer DEPTH of knowledge over breadth.
    A-Levels are harder than Access in terms of content. The problem with Access is that to max out on distinctions really only shows you're an AAA student (going off UCAS equiv, and really it's more BBB in terms of actual content).

    For the most competitive law courses, you rather need something more or you could benefit from something more. That is where an A-Level comes in. But it is more sensible to do a 1-year A-Level alongside Access (which takes a whole lot of commitment, organisation and skill) rather than have 45 at distinction (basically AAA) achieved and then have an A-Level. By the time you're applying, you'd have no prediction/an unreliable prediction for the A-Level -- which is the problem of applying with Access in the same application cycle.

    If OP is just going to Westminster anyway, the blindness of the Access prediction won't matter. Firstly, Westminster is not competitive. Secondly, they'd likely have all their Access grades in by Clearing.
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    (Original post by Notoriety)
    A-Levels are harder than Access in terms of content. The problem with Access is that to max out on distinctions really only shows you're an AAA student (going off UCAS equiv, and really it's more BBB in terms of actual content).

    For the most competitive law courses, you rather need something more or you could benefit from something more. That is where an A-Level comes in. But it is more sensible to do a 1-year A-Level alongside Access (which takes a whole lot of commitment, organisation and skill) rather than have 45 at distinction (basically AAA) achieved and then have an A-Level. By the time you're applying, you'd have no prediction/an unreliable prediction for the A-Level -- which is the problem of applying with Access in the same application cycle.

    If OP is just going to Westminster anyway, the blindness of the Access prediction won't matter. Firstly, Westminster is not competitive. Secondly, they'd likely have all their Access grades in by Clearing.
    Access courses are slightly higher than A levels, nevertheless it isn't lower by any means and in some cases more preferred, but the failure rate is too high in access courses, law has no specific subject requirements so access isn't a problem.

    I'm just gonna take 3 A levels this September for a year because I want traditional qualifications alongside an access course, the versatility of my resume will be unique.

    As having A btec level 2 in performing arts, a six month intensive access course, and 3 A levels in philosophy, drama and creative writing.

    I will have a prediction for A levels as I will have my btec level 2 and access to higher education in law, I can probably get into a good uni with the access course alone let alone doing 3 A levels with, so I will have approximately 6 A levels that are very different and versatile to one another, having both a focused intensive course considered slightly higher than A levels, and the average traditional qualifications through a broad range of subjects.
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    (Original post by Efron)
    Access courses are slightly higher than A levels,
    No it isn't. Check the UCAS Tariff points.
    Distinctions in AccessHE = 144 points
    3 A* at A-level = 168 points
    I can probably get into a good uni with the access course alone
    Have you actually checked entry requirements for "good unis" with an AccessHE alone?

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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Have you actually checked entry requirements for "good unis" with an AccessHE alone?

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    Well the one that I'm doing which was told by my tutor to be slightly higher, as it is an intensive course rather than a year.

    All the uni's said we accept access courses without A levels for law, UCL said that to me, but for other subjects because they have specific subject requirements then it is best to do A Levels, but it isn't for law.
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    (Original post by Efron)
    I think it's the UK education authority that would not accept it by law if a student got all the grades but still didn't get accepted to one of their five choices in which they got the necessary grades to enter in.
    Not true, every year you get straight A/A* grade students who have no university place simply because they applied to very competitive courses and unis and were unlucky enough to get rejected.

    There is no law that guarantees a student a university place - you apply and hopefully get offers. If not, most people will just take a gap year and reapply.
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    (Original post by Efron)
    Well the one that I'm doing which was told by my tutor to be slightly higher, as it is an intensive course rather than a year.

    All the uni's said we accept access courses without A levels for law, UCL said that to me, but for other subjects because they have specific subject requirements then it is best to do A Levels, but it isn't for law.
    It's your choice to do an accelerated course. It doesn't attract more tariff points as a result.

    And did you ask UCL if you meet their GCSE requirements too?
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    It's your choice to do an accelerated course. It doesn't attract more tariff points as a result.

    And did you ask UCL if you meet their GCSE requirements too?
    They said that they take specific circumstances if you haven't completed them, which I do have a personal circumstance as I had to leave my education because of my mothers illness, evan though I was doing well.

    Either way I do have the equivalent of 4 A stars and universitys do not really look at GCSE's as much as A levels. If I prove myself with the Access course in law, and 3 A levels in Philosophy, English language, Drama, I doubt they will point fingers at me and tell me to do more or better GCSE's.

    I emailed the Oxford law faculty and they didn't seem to highlight GCSE's at all, and I reckon if they didn't highlight it then most likely other healthy universities wouldn't apply pressure to it. Here I'll copy and paste there email for you.

    Dear Efron,

    The Law degree at Oxford does not require prospective students to have studied any specific subjects within their qualifications, so long as their qualifications meet the entrance requirements:https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/unde...nce?wssl=1.*We don’t accept General Studies as a subject, which means we don’t accept the course called ‘General Studies’ or ‘Critical Thinking’ or any other form of generalised course that your school might offer.

    Whilst we are unable to give personal advice on applications,*we would always encourage students to study those subjects they have academic enthusiasm for – and in which, therefore, they are likely to get the best marks.

    There is no absolute requirement for particular grades at GCSE; although a competitive applicant would normally have a majority of As and A*s, this is by no means a barrier for entry. Also, when we look at GCSE results, we look at them in the context of the overall performance of the school or college where you studied. So if, for example, you didn’t get all As, but your results were among the best in your year group, that will be taken into account. Furthermore, if you feel that you underperformed at GCSE, we are always happy to take into account extenuating circumstances as long as there is more recent evidence of really strong academic performance at AS or A-level. You should talk about why in your personal statement, and it’s really helpful if your referee can mention it too.

    *
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    (Original post by Efron)
    Access courses are slightly higher than A levels, nevertheless it isn't lower by any means and in some cases more preferred
    45 distinctions is AAA. Some courses will accept 30 distinctions and some will require 45, even if A-Level reqs are A*AA+. That is not to say that an Access course's content is more challenging than A-Level or that less than 45 is as impressive as AAA or A*AA+ at A-Level; it simply factors in the steep learning curve Access students have and the general difficulty of performing well from beginning to end. The actual substance of the course is below that of A-Level. It is not preferred by anyone; the type of learner (i.e independent and mature) might be. I would say that a university would prefer the learner type who also studied A-Level.

    but the failure rate is too high in access courses, law has no specific subject requirements so access isn't a problem.
    Because there is a steep learning curve and Access is completed by learners who have usually left education with little success. The traits which caused them to fail first time usually linger when they retry, hence there being a high drop-out rate. Also the learners are busier than your typical A-Level student, and have to balance real-life obligations with this complicated course which promises employment and academic success several years down the line. Much better to go back to working in the office full time, and having a steady stream of income and immediate reward.

    I'm just gonna take 3 A levels this September for a year because I want traditional qualifications alongside an access course, the versatility of my resume will be unique.
    I would not advise taking 3 accelerated A-Levels. That will be a great challenge; people normally only do 1 or 2 concurrently. And if you bomb them you'll still have to put them on your UCAS.

    so I will have approximately 6 A levels
    No, you'll have an Access course and 3 A-Levels. They will not be considered as 6.
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    (Original post by Notoriety)
    No, you'll have an Access course and 3 A-Levels. They will not be considered as 6.
    Aproximately 6 as an access course is the equivalent of 3 A levels, access courses are not lower by any means, Universitys do not look at the ucas points and peaple have gone to Oxford and Cambridge with an access course alone, or having a btec level 3 extended diploma alone.
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    (Original post by Efron)
    Aproximately 6 as an access course is the equivalent of 3 A levels, access courses are not lower by any means, Universitys do not look at the ucas points and peaple have gone to Oxford and Cambridge with an access course alone, or having a btec level 3 extended diploma alone.
    You can check Unistats and say what percentage of students enrolled on Oxford, Cambridge, LSE, UCL, KCL, Durham, Notts, Bristol, Warwick, even Exeter have taken Access. It will be 1% or 0%, or was the last time I checked.

    The only people I have worked with who've been rejected for 5 top-tier law schools are Access students; it is fairly common, which is why you've been advised to manage your expectations and aim for lower than Oxford. On here, there are Access students who've got into UCL, KCL and the likes ... after a decade in highly complicated and demanding professional work. You do not have that; you only have your previous qualifications, what you can rustle together for your personal statement, and the reference of someone used to sending students to the ex-poly. The odds are heavily against you.
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    (Original post by Notoriety)
    I would not advise taking 3 accelerated A-Levels. That will be a great challenge; people normally only do 1 or 2 concurrently. And if you bomb them you'll still have to put them on your UCAS.
    144% agree.

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    (Original post by Notoriety)
    You can check Unistats and say what percentage of students enrolled on Oxford, Cambridge, LSE, UCL, KCL, Durham, Notts, Bristol, Warwick, even Exeter have taken Access. It will be 1% or 0%, or was the last time I checked.

    The only people I have worked with who've been rejected for 5 top-tier law schools are Access students; it is fairly common, which is why you've been advised to manage your expectations and aim for lower than Oxford. On here, there are Access students who've got into UCL, KCL and the likes ... after a decade in highly complicated and demanding professional work. You do not have that; you only have your previous qualifications, what you can rustle together for your personal statement, and the reference of someone used to sending students to the ex-poly. The odds are heavily against you.
    (Original post by Notoriety)
    You can check Unistats and say what percentage of students enrolled on Oxford, Cambridge, LSE, UCL, KCL, Durham, Notts, Bristol, Warwick, even Exeter have taken Access. It will be 1% or 0%, or was the last time I checked.

    The only people I have worked with who've been rejected for 5 top-tier law schools are Access students; it is fairly common, which is why you've been advised to manage your expectations and aim for lower than Oxford. On here, there are Access students who've got into UCL, KCL and the likes ... after a decade in highly complicated and demanding professional work. You do not have that; you only have your previous qualifications, what you can rustle together for your personal statement, and the reference of someone used to sending students to the ex-poly. The odds are heavily against you.
    The odds are not 1%, you are mistaken I know a girl who had a btec and went to Oxford to study psychology, it is a qualification on Oxford and ucl says that it makes no difference whether you do A levels or access as long as you get the grades. There are more people who get in with A levels simply because there are more people doing A levels, most school leavers go on to work rather than come back to education.

    Furthermore I haven't been advised anything, because I'm doing 3 academic A levels anyway after I finish my access
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