Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

if I get all the grades necessary, does one of my five uni choices have to accept me. watch

    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Efron)
    Aproximately 6 as an access course is the equivalent of 3 A levels, access courses are not lower by any means, Universitys do not look at the ucas points and peaple have gone to Oxford and Cambridge with an access course alone, or having a btec level 3 extended diploma alone.
    I'd recommend learning how to spell words like 'universities' and 'people' before thinking of attending any university. Your confusion about the law stems from if you have an offer from a university and you actually achieve the requirements of the offer, they have to accept you because that is a binding contract. However that is only if any university actually gives you an offer in the first place, which they do not legally have to do at all; it's only if you have an offer that a contract is formed.

    Thousands of people fail to get into university every year by getting 5 rejections (even when they have the standard grades for entry for each university they've applied to) and a lot of those people will have worked their asses off. Their options are to try to get into university through Clearing (no university has to legally take anyone through Clearing), or take a gap year and apply again in the next admissions cycle. A lot of universities, including LSE, state that either having or being predicted the standard grades for entry does not guarantee a place at all. There is no UCAS requirement or law that at least 1 of your 5 choices has to give you an offer.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Peer Support Volunteers
    This thread is a rollercoaster...
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Efron)
    The odds are not 1%, you are mistaken I know a girl who had a btec and went to Oxford to study psychology, it is a qualification on Oxford and ucl says that it makes no difference whether you do A levels or access as long as you get the grades. There are more people who get in with A levels simply because there are more people doing A levels, most school leavers go on to work rather than come back to education.

    Furthermore I haven't been advised anything, because I'm doing 3 academic A levels anyway alongside my access
    I never said your odds are 1%. I said the percentage of people enrolled at Oxford or Cambridge ... will be 0% or 1%. In fact, when I last checked I think Cambridge was 1% and Oxford was 0%. Now Oxford is 0% and Cambridge is 0%. That heavily suggests that Access students do not have an easy ride to Oxbridge, even if one or two students manage to get in every year. There's an exception to every rule.

    I think I have given you enough information here. If you have any questions, do tag me.
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by Efron)
    The odds are not 1%, you are mistaken I know a girl who had a btec and went to Oxford to study psychology
    Notoriety


    Oxford Access HE offers (and acceptances) between 2011 and 2016 without any other Level 3 qualification = zero
    (This is for the entire university, not specifically Law)

    Name:  Screen Shot 2018-03-03 at 18.51.59.jpg
Views: 21
Size:  150.4 KB

    https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/reque...ncoming-890633
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Notoriety


    Oxford Access HE offers (and acceptances) between 2011 and 2016 without any other Level 3 qualification = zero
    (This is for the entire university, not specifically Law)

    Name:  Screen Shot 2018-03-03 at 18.51.59.jpg
Views: 21
Size:  150.4 KB

    https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/reque...ncoming-890633
    Oh my ... I never expected it to be that bad!

    Thank you for sharing that.
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    If the analysis is extended to include those with other Level 3 qualifications in addition to Access to HE (e.g. at least 1 A-level):

    Name:  Screen Shot 2018-03-03 at 18.56.57.jpg
Views: 17
Size:  185.1 KB

    It's just one or 2 per year. So rather exceptional.

    Notoriety Efron
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Notoriety


    Oxford Access HE offers (and acceptances) between 2011 and 2016 without any other Level 3 qualification = zero
    (This is for the entire university, not specifically Law)

    Name:  Screen Shot 2018-03-03 at 18.51.59.jpg
Views: 21
Size:  150.4 KB

    https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/reque...ncoming-890633
    But it's still possible but rare, same goes for btec, nevertheless UCL accepts it as I have contacted them and asked.

    But Oxford is just a universal exception, I'm still doing 3 A levels this September alongside an access course.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by Notoriety)
    Oh my ... I never expected it to be that bad!

    Thank you for sharing that.
    Cambridge is "better":

    Name:  Screen Shot 2018-03-03 at 19.02.00.jpg
Views: 24
Size:  59.6 KB

    https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/reque..._passthrough=1
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by Efron)
    I'm still doing 3 accelerated A levels this September alongside an access course.
    Which is likely to be 1 or 2 too many to do well. It's neither necessary nor desirable.
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    A key skill for any legal discussion is identifying when you are losing and to negotiate a better outcome for the client.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gregor99)
    Just letting you know 3 A levels in one year will probably be very hard.
    A levels are 1 year, the only reason it would be 2 years is if you do AS which is no longer mandatory.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Still no picnic!

    The Cambridge stat could could include those who have A-Levels too, though. As Access would be the highest as well as A-Level. Alas, the inherent ambiguity of FOI requests and responses. But as I posted above, the most recent BA Law stats show 0% Access.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Efron)
    A levels are 1 year, the only reason it would be 2 years is if you do AS which is no longer mandatory.
    A-levels are normally 2 year courses.
    The AS exam has been taken out but all content is still examined that would normally be in an AS exam.
    An example is in Biology A level the first topic you learn that could be examined in AS is carbohydrates. With the new linear system this topic can still appear in the final exam.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Efron)
    A levels are 1 year, the only reason it would be 2 years is if you do AS which is no longer mandatory.
    A Levels are a two year course, there is two years of content to cover. AS Levels are just when you've covered half the content (so year one) however you are then tested on this again for the A Level exams. So you will have to learn 2 years of content in one year.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Efron)
    Aproximately 6 as an access course is the equivalent of 3 A levels, access courses are not lower by any means, Universitys do not look at the ucas points and peaple have gone to Oxford and Cambridge with an access course alone, or having a btec level 3 extended diploma alone.
    Access course is NOT equivalent to A Levels. A Levels score higher in the method the unis use to select student to make offers. And Universities do look at UCAS points.

    Access/BTEC are usually for those students who are want to go uni but haven't got A Levels, or who have low scores or even failed all of them.

    I know someone who went to Cambridge to do Economics - he's straight A*s in 10 GCSES and A* in 5 A Levels. The dude eventually finished up with a PhD.

    Could you name people you know who've got into Oxford/Cambridge with only Access course/BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma alone?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Notoriety


    Oxford Access HE offers (and acceptances) between 2011 and 2016 without any other Level 3 qualification = zero
    (This is for the entire university, not specifically Law)

    Name:  Screen Shot 2018-03-03 at 18.51.59.jpg
Views: 21
Size:  150.4 KB

    https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/reque...ncoming-890633
    The Stats nerd in me likes this

    Oxford/Cambridge have rejected folks with tops grades in everything due to the large number of application they get so it's not surprising that Access course students are unlikely to get in.
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by Efron)
    A levels are 1 year, the only reason it would be 2 years is if you do AS which is no longer mandatory.
    Oh dear, you really haven't done your research on this at all have you?!

    A linear A-level *is* a 2 year course, unless you are doing an accelerated course which will cover 2 years of content in 1 year and is therefore, by your early discussion, more difficult...
    • Very Important Poster
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Very Important Poster
    PS Reviewer
    In general:
    Cambridge is "better" for access (particularly from mature students - they've even got the late deadline to accommodate in year applications whereas the only way it'd work for oxford is applying post results as the OP seems to want), Oxford are better for BTECs (as in they actually accept them...).

    Level 3+ means A levels or higher qualifications, FE funding rules would make it tricky to go from an Access diploma to then study A levels (although I'm surprised that OP hasn't had to take GCSE maths and english alongside their Access diploma - that's a requirement of FE funding to either have them or to be studying towards them).

    I'd still personally steer OP away from A levels AFTER an Access diploma - Oxford recommend A levels alongside to meet subject requirements (so not necessary for law). It does demonstrate a lack of progression to go from level 3 to more level 3 and an emphasis on breadth over depth (equivalent to 6 A levels isn't considered "better" by Oxford - they want quality not quantity). They welcome OU applicants studying for 120 points at level 1 for entry into first year, it'd be better for funding and allow OP to demonstrate an upwards progression (and depending on compatability would allow them to enter into yr 2 for less competitive law degrees - so if the "dream" doesn't work out they wouldn't have wasted another year chasing it by re-treading level 3 study).
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by PQ)
    I'd still personally steer OP away from A levels AFTER an Access diploma - Oxford recommend A levels alongside to meet subject requirements (so not necessary for law). It does demonstrate a lack of progression to go from level 3 to more level 3 and an emphasis on breadth over depth (equivalent to 6 A levels isn't considered "better" by Oxford - they want quality not quantity). They welcome OU applicants studying for 120 points at level 1 for entry into first year, it'd be better for funding and allow OP to demonstrate an upwards progression (and depending on compatability would allow them to enter into yr 2 for less competitive law degrees - so if the "dream" doesn't work out they wouldn't have wasted another year chasing it by re-treading level 3 study).
    Noted.

    Please pay close attention Efron. PQ is extremely experienced on university admissions.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    There is absolutely NO POINT in doing 3 accelerated A-Levels in September. 1, yes. 3, no. Because

    1) You've done an access course the 'equivalent' to 3 A-levels
    2) A-Levels are harder than an access course. Let alone accelerate A-levels. You will not cope, whether you enjoy it or not.
    3) Universities will consider an Access Course alone or an Access Course combined with 1 or 2 A-Levels. But not combined with 3. They'll probably just consider the 3 A-Levels as that's all that is needed for entry. --- For example, I did AS levels before doing a BTEC to get myself into a Film Production course. I HAD to declare my AS Level grades, but it was my diploma grades that were considered.

    Basically it is quality over quantity.
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?
Applying to uni

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Graduates celebrate

How to write a good personal statement

Expert PS advice from the people who will read it

Uni match

Uni match

Can't decide where to apply? Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Two students working together

A-Z of universities

Read our guides to unis and colleges from around the UK

A student working on a computer

Personal statement help

Use our tool to get your ideal PS quickly!

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student looking down a microscope

Planning open days

Find upcoming open days and get advice on preparing.

Help out other students

These questions still need an answer

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.