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if I get all the grades necessary, does one of my five uni choices have to accept me. watch

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    (Original post by Notoriety)
    A-Levels are harder than Access in terms of content. The problem with Access is that to max out on distinctions really only shows you're an AAA student (going off UCAS equiv, and really it's more BBB in terms of actual content).
    Really - I didn't realise you were an expert on level 3 qualifications? UCAS QIP (ie an assessment of the depth and breadth and level of the qualifications) has Access as level with SCQF level 6 and 7 (SCQF Level 7 sits across Levels 3 and 4 in England, Northern Ireland and Wales. - so higher than A levels in terms of difficulty/content). A levels and Highers are squarely considered to be SCQF level 6.

    There's plenty of reasons to be sceptical of the OPs chance of success - implying that Access is a worse preparation for university than A levels isn't one. You might know applicants that haven't been successful (and the particular set up of applications at Oxford makes success with any 1 year qualification an extreme long shot - hence the crap acceptance rates) - but that's a flaw with Oxford's admissions process rather than with Access diplomas themselves. I'm sure they miss out on dozens of students who would thrive on their courses each year (you've probably known some)...but that's their loss.
    If OP is just going to Westminster anyway, the blindness of the Access prediction won't matter. Firstly, Westminster is not competitive. Secondly, they'd likely have all their Access grades in by Clearing.
    In which case why advise OP to take 1-2 intensive A levels in a year after an Access diploma?
    Their access diploma would get them into Westminster without any other qualifications and Oxford only advise concurrent A levels to meet subject requirements. With 120 credits from the OU LLB the OP could well get into yr 2 at Westminster (compatability dependent obviously) and avoid them wasting an unecessary year studying A levels that aren't required for their backup choice and aren't recommended by their "dream" choice.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    Their access diploma would get them into Westminster without any other qualifications and Oxford only advise concurrent A levels to meet subject requirements. With 120 credits from the OU LLB the OP could well get into yr 2 at Westminster (compatability dependent obviously) and avoid them wasting an unecessary year studying A levels that aren't required for their backup choice and aren't recommended by their "dream" choice.
    Yes it's frustrating OP hasn't replied to my specific recommendation that they apply now using their AccessHE.

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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Yes it's frustrating OP hasn't replied to my specific recommendation that they apply now using their AccessHE.

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    It's a good suggestion - it'd give them some experience of the UCAS process and feedback on their application in the worst case and a guaranteed backup in the best case (especially if OP isn't successful in nailing distinctions in all their Access credits - which would put the other aspirational choices off the table completely). Plus even if they withdrew and reapplied they'd be on Westminsters radar as an engaged applicant.

    It's a win - win option and well worth the ~£20 to apply.
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    (Original post by Efron)
    A levels are 1 year, the only reason it would be 2 years is if you do AS which is no longer mandatory.
    A single A level has a Guided learning time of 360 hours. Over 9 months (Sept - June excluding holidays) that's ~ 10 hours a week MINIMUM. 3 A levels would be 30 hours a week study (excluding any "notional" independent study - ie homework/revision - to get more than an average grade). So manageable but intensive with no time for any job or social life. Especially if you add on 2 GCSEs (that you'd need to get top grades in)...

    And for what benefit? It isn't recommended or attractive to universities - admission to universities isn't a case of racking up tariff points like XP until you can level up to an offer, it's about demonstrating that you're capable of thriving on the course and suitable for the learning environment at that university.
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Yes it's frustrating OP hasn't replied to my specific recommendation that they apply now using their AccessHE.

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    I’m 90% sure they’re trolling, or very stubborn. Advice seems to bounce off them rather than sink in, even when people are trying to help.

    Also smells a bit like that “Lolzo” character, when they made troll posts pretending to be a gcse student who got bad grades but acted like they would get into medicine easily..... (https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...rimary_content )

    But i’m just conspiracy theorising here.
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    (Original post by cat_mac)
    I’m 90% sure they’re trolling, or very stubborn. Advice seems to bounce off them rather than sink in, even when people are trying to help.

    Also smells a bit like that “Lolzo” character, when they made troll posts pretending to be a gcse student who got bad grades but acted like they would get into medicine easily..... (https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...rimary_content )

    But i’m just conspiracy theorising here.
    The 1 year A-level thing in particular has raised significant alarm bells...
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    The 1 year A-level thing in particular has raised significant alarm bells...
    And claiming they could easily do 3 A-levels in six months, I’m hoping it’s a troll and there isn’t a person that deluded walking around.
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    (Original post by cat_mac)
    And claiming they could easily do 3 A-levels in six months, I’m hoping it’s a troll and there isn’t a person that deluded walking around.
    Well they seemed to think they didn't have to do the AS content... or are trolling.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    Really - I didn't realise you were an expert on level 3 qualifications? UCAS QIP (ie an assessment of the depth and breadth and level of the qualifications) has Access as level with SCQF level 6 and 7 (SCQF Level 7 sits across Levels 3 and 4 in England, Northern Ireland and Wales. - so higher than A levels in terms of difficulty/content). A levels and Highers are squarely considered to be SCQF level 6.

    There's plenty of reasons to be sceptical of the OPs chance of success - implying that Access is a worse preparation for university than A levels isn't one. You might know applicants that haven't been successful (and the particular set up of applications at Oxford makes success with any 1 year qualification an extreme long shot - hence the crap acceptance rates) - but that's a flaw with Oxford's admissions process rather than with Access diplomas themselves. I'm sure they miss out on dozens of students who would thrive on their courses each year (you've probably known some)...but that's their loss.

    In which case why advise OP to take 1-2 intensive A levels in a year after an Access diploma?
    Their access diploma would get them into Westminster without any other qualifications and Oxford only advise concurrent A levels to meet subject requirements. With 120 credits from the OU LLB the OP could well get into yr 2 at Westminster (compatability dependent obviously) and avoid them wasting an unecessary year studying A levels that aren't required for their backup choice and aren't recommended by their "dream" choice.
    It is one thing for Uni X to accept Access. It is another thing for them to be sufficiently impressed by it. If you look at my point, it is systemic across all top law courses. Durham is 0%; UCL is 1%; LSE is 0%; KCL is 0%; highly understanding Bristol is 1%; Warwick is 1%.

    As for the difficulty, I do some stuff with the local FE. We have people on EEE from A-Level get 45 at distinction just a year later. We have people who fail pre-Access maths and English, and have to resit while completing Access, end up with 45 at distinction! (And OP on distinctions, by the looks of it.) I wonder why. There is a lot of regional variation which they tried to do away with in 2014-2015, but they were ultimately unsuccessful.

    In fact, I have seen the course get easier through the years as course leaders are pressured to keep the number of students getting into unis high as possible. They sacrifice proper marking practices in order to manage it. At one point, 1.5% of Access students were sitting on all distinctions ... not the case now.

    EVs rarely challenge any marking decisions. Work is often resubmitted without being capped. The content is incredibly superficial. Some of ours did a bio on someone from WWI, and the sole assessment criteria was communication and autonomy. People were getting distinctions though their work was copied off Wikipedia, no literature references, grammar errors all over the shop, no analysis. Now I don't know why UCAS has it at level 7 -- maybe because referencing is typically used in assignments and that's more HE-y.
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    (Original post by cat_mac)
    I’m 90% sure they’re trolling, or very stubborn. Advice seems to bounce off them rather than sink in, even when people are trying to help.

    Also smells a bit like that “Lolzo” character, when they made troll posts pretending to be a gcse student who got bad grades but acted like they would get into medicine easily..... (https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...rimary_content )

    But i’m just conspiracy theorising here.
    No I'm not trolling, I actually thank the comments given to me.
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    (Original post by Efron)
    No I'm not trolling, I actually thank the comments given to me.
    It's a shame you won't listen to a word of any of the comments, due to what you very incorrectly think and what your incredibly misinfomed mate says.
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Yes it's frustrating OP hasn't replied to my specific recommendation that they apply now using their AccessHE.

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    Thank you again doonesbury, I pray for giving me soo much good information, I think the best option would be to go do a OU, and then either apply for Oxford first year, if not then a second year at less competitive universitie.
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    OP's responses are making my brain hurt with how unbelievably delusional they are being.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    It's a shame you won't listen to a word of any of the comments, due to what you very incorrectly think and what your incredibly misinfomed mate says.
    I'm not sure what you mean, I've gathered plenty of great comments. The only person I massively disagree with is notoriety, the rest are good.

    They've told me that a OU is far better than doing A levels, and I may take that option after my access.
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    (Original post by Efron)
    No I'm not trolling, I actually thank the comments given to me.
    Not convinced, if you’re wanting to become a lawyer then your clear path is going onto undergrad after your access course. Doing A-Levels in unrelated courses seems to be just to prove you can, when no one is asking you to prove anything.

    Follow the advice people gave of checking if / how many gcse’s courses require, most say they don’t care too much about the grade but it is implied that some gcse’s are required. Email unis and ask about your specific situation of no GCSE’s and see if you need to do anything. There’s no shame in doing GCSE’s later in life, if that’s what you need to do to follow your dream.

    Instead of doing things to prove you can, look specifically at what you can do to get accepted onto a law degree. If you just want to do some A-Levels for fun, take two years and do it properly. At the moment your short term goals don’t match your long term goal, self reflect and figure out what you want to do.

    If you’re trolling and I wrote all that for a troll reply I will become aggressive so don’t try to play me if this is some game.
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    (Original post by cat_mac)
    Not convinced, if you’re wanting to become a lawyer then your clear path is going onto undergrad after your access course. Doing A-Levels in unrelated courses seems to be just to prove you can, when no one is asking you to prove anything.

    Follow the advice people gave of checking if / how many gcse’s courses require, most say they don’t care too much about the grade but it is implied that some gcse’s are required. Email unis and ask about your specific situation of no GCSE’s and see if you need to do anything. There’s no shame in doing GCSE’s later in life, if that’s what you need to do to follow your dream.

    Instead of doing things to prove you can, look specifically at what you can do to get accepted onto a law degree. If you just want to do some A-Levels for fun, take two years and do it properly. At the moment your short term goals don’t match your long term goal, self reflect and figure out what you want to do.

    If you’re trolling and I wrote all that for a troll reply I will become aggressive so don’t try to play me if this is some game.
    Thank you honey
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    (Original post by Efron)
    Thank you again doonesbury, I pray for giving me soo much good information, I think the best option would be to go do a OU, and then either apply for Oxford first year, if not then a second year at less competitive universitie.
    Apply to universities now, not next year.

    Birmingham, Exeter, Southampton and QMUL, for example, are still accepting applications. All are RG, if that matters to you.

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    I'm surprised this thread is still active. It's probably time to let OP have a good think about what he wants and to let him act on the advice he feels is best. None of us can force him to make a particular decision and this has become so circular that I am half in agreement that it is some kind of satire. Plenty of advice has been given in good faith - I doubt there is much value in providing more.

    (Original post by cat_mac)
    And claiming they could easily do 3 A-levels in six months, I’m hoping it’s a troll and there isn’t a person that deluded walking around.
    To be fair, many people if sufficiently motivated could certainly do 3 A levels in six months. It would require persistent dedication though, which probably makes the 'easy' designation inappropriate. This isn't to say it is a good idea for the OP, of course.
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    (Original post by Efron)
    I'm not sure what you mean, I've gathered plenty of great comments. The only person I massively disagree with is notoriety, the rest are good.

    They've told me that a OU is far better than doing A levels, and I may take that option after my access.
    I'm confused- what are you trying to achieve and why do you want to do it?

    What courses are you interested in at university? Which careers are you looking into and are university courses needed?
    What enthuses you about the above, and why do you think you might have an aptitude for it?
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    (Original post by PQ)
    In general:
    Cambridge is "better" for access (particularly from mature students - they've even got the late deadline to accommodate in year applications whereas the only way it'd work for oxford is applying post results as the OP seems to want), Oxford are better for BTECs (as in they actually accept them...).

    Level 3+ means A levels or higher qualifications, FE funding rules would make it tricky to go from an Access diploma to then study A levels (although I'm surprised that OP hasn't had to take GCSE maths and english alongside their Access diploma - that's a requirement of FE funding to either have them or to be studying towards them).

    I'd still personally steer OP away from A levels AFTER an Access diploma - Oxford recommend A levels alongside to meet subject requirements (so not necessary for law). It does demonstrate a lack of progression to go from level 3 to more level 3 and an emphasis on breadth over depth (equivalent to 6 A levels isn't considered "better" by Oxford - they want quality not quantity). They welcome OU applicants studying for 120 points at level 1 for entry into first year, it'd be better for funding and allow OP to demonstrate an upwards progression (and depending on compatability would allow them to enter into yr 2 for less competitive law degrees - so if the "dream" doesn't work out they wouldn't have wasted another year chasing it by re-treading level 3 study).
    Thank you for informing me about such an amazing course such as the OU. Sorry for intruding or causing a hassle but you and doonesbury are the only peaple who answer my question rather than just discouraging me for no reason, but obviously that is the case on open forums such as this.

    But is the OU a first year degree course offered at local colleges? Is it a full time course that I have to attend or is it a distant learning course, does it stand for Open University, if so is it level 4 or 5. Is it 1 year? Do universities like Oxford accept it for their first year law in jurisprudence, aren't they gonna dismiss me as I've already studied the content of their first year.

    And if it's higher than A levels then isn't that going to put me ahead of those that have already done A levels.

    And finally with an access course alone in law, do I have the same chance to get into Oxford the same way someone with a levels has a chance. If so how much better would it be to have an access course in law and an OU and then apply, rather than having an access course and A levels starting this September. And do universitys take predicted grades evan for the OU to then apply for 2019 entry while my course starts in this September 2018 if I do the OU.

    You said that law doesn't have specific subject requirements, so an access course in law is enough without A levels am I right? If so alongside an access course and then an OU, I would then stand a good chance than other people applying to Oxford for their first year law, as they will mostly have A levels and I will have both the equivalent of A levels which is the same, and the OU which is the first year of the university course, which will make me eligible to apply for second year at many universities and the first year in Oxford with a higher chance since my qualifications are higher than the standard A level entry groups that apply.
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