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    Did any of you doctors know what you wanted to specialise in before you got into medical school? I've been reading about all the medical specialities in the NHS and they all sound very interesting. There's only a couple that I know for certain I wouldn't want to do.
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    No but i know i don’t want to go anywhere near paediatrics.
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    (Original post by HateOCR)
    No but i know i don’t want to go anywhere near paediatrics.
    Yeah I don't think I'd like only treating children.

    Thoughts on this?

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    (Original post by HateOCR)
    No but i know i don’t want to go anywhere near paediatrics.
    The reason i said this is because when young adults, adults and the elderly are sick and are in need of care they co-operate better than young children do. I think children will just make the job harder. Im not a doctor yet btw just posting my opinion now but i might come back at this thread in a few years time and laugh at this comment in between my job breaks as a paediatrician 😂
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    I thought I did, but my career plans changed
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    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    Yeah I don't think I'd like only treating children.

    Thoughts on this?

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    :lol: amazing
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    A&E - don't have to see patients for too long but it's like a war zone in A&E where the main goal is to survive instead of treating patients
    Dermatology - easy lifestyle but I don't know if I'd ever care enough to turn up to work
    Radiology - you don't have to see patients and it's not as dull as pathology but I'd probably keep falling asleep in the dark so i dunno really
    Obs & Gynae - mix of everything but obs especially is always going to be risky with emergency patients and I don't really want to deal with lawsuits
    Anaes/ICU - lots of sleeping patients who can't talk back to you but I can't do crosswords and stuff. Cons: surgeons

    Specialties I definitely don't want to do:
    Surgery - I'd either pass out from standing still from so long or I'd fall onto the patient. Cons: surgeons
    Psych - depressing as hell
    Paeds - if you think the kids are bad, wait till you meet the parents
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    (Original post by paniking_and_not_revising)
    A&E - don't have to see patients for too long but it's like a war zone in A&E where the main goal is to survive instead of treating patients
    Dermatology - easy lifestyle but I don't know if I'd ever care enough to turn up to work
    Radiology - you don't have to see patients and it's not as dull as pathology but I'd probably keep falling asleep in the dark so i dunno really
    Obs & Gynae - mix of everything but obs especially is always going to be risky with emergency patients and I don't really want to deal with lawsuits
    Anaes/ICU - lots of sleeping patients who can't talk back to you but I can't do crosswords and stuff. Cons: surgeons

    Specialties I definitely don't want to do:
    Surgery - I'd either pass out from standing still from so long or I'd fall onto the patient. Cons: surgeons
    Psych - depressing as hell
    Paeds - if you think the kids are bad, wait till you meet the parents
    You don't like surgeons? Are they really that bad?
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    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    Did any of you doctors know what you wanted to specialise in before you got into medical school? I've been reading about all the medical specialities in the NHS and they all sound very interesting. There's only a couple that I know for certain I wouldn't want to do.
    My main interests in med school were anaesthetics and A&E because they were the most interesting placements with the friendliest consultants and you got to do a lot of clerking and procedures. Anything which involved standing around for hours in theatre or at the back of a five hour ward round was pretty dull in comparison.

    However, being a registrar or a consultant isn't like being a med student or an FY1/SHO. You won't just be observing from the back or doing boring stuff all the time, so I think it's important to look ahead to what the more senior people in the specialty do on a day to day basis before ruling things out too soon.

    That said, you have to draw your line somewhere. My idea of a definite no specialty would be something like endocrinology where the ward/take seems to be in a constant state of chaos and you get dumped on endlessly with inordinate amounts of paperwork, board rounds, end of life conversations, learning in nibbles etc. I don't care how interesting being an endocrinology consultant is, the journey to get there is just not worth it for me.

    I think a lot of med students change their mind quite early on when they start work and some people realise that they actually really dislike working in a hospital and would rather be in the community. The hospital system and way of practising medicine is definitely not for everyone. Same goes for hating nights, being on call or dealing with crazy rotas and inadequate training programmes. Those kind of considerations eventually become more of a priority, even if you really loved a specialty as a med student or during a four month FY1/2 job.

    Basically I think most people will end up specialising in something different to what they initially envisaged, and I don't think that's a negative thing at all.

    Another flowchart lol:

    http://cdn.almost.thedoctorschannel..../specialty.png
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    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    You don't like surgeons? Are they really that bad?
    They're alright actually. They just seem so intimidating.

    I'll probably change my opinions of specialties later on though. I'm only a first year.
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    :cry: According to your charts....

    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    ...
    I am a sane, hard-working, insensitive, doesn't matter nice or mean doctor
    looking after paralysed patients!


    This is even worse, apparently I like nothing, have OK grades and I am a huge nerd!

    It's all correct, of course.

    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    ....
    To OP - yes I did.... "Phantoms in the Brain" inspired me to do medicine after all!
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    I knew I'll find you on this thread!The chart is wrong,don't worry I can confirm this

    Now you're trying to inspire me to do neurology :rofl:
    (Original post by ecolier)
    :cry: According to your charts....



    I am a sane, hard-working, insensitive, doesn't matter nice or mean doctor
    looking after paralysed patients!




    This is even worse, apparently I like nothing, have OK grades and I am a huge nerd!

    It's all correct, of course.



    To OP - yes I did.... "Phantoms in the Brain" inspired me to do medicine after all!
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    I knew I'll find you on this thread!The chart is wrong,don't worry I can confirm this

    Now you're trying to inspire me to do neurology :rofl:
    :rofl3:

    I :love: neurology!
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    I started chasing medicine wanting to go into pathology because I watched too much CSI

    Did some work experience and added GP and A&E to my interests.

    Went into med school. At the moment put off by pathology (so interesting, but I nearly threw up because of the smell :sick: so I'll need to build a better stomach for it) and psych (I just don't know how I'll deal because I keep thinking I have symptoms while I'm being taught them), still interested by GP and A&E, added urology, anaesthetics and radiology to interests.

    But I'm only first year, so we'll see what happens.
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    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    Did any of you doctors know what you wanted to specialise in before you got into medical school? I've been reading about all the medical specialities in the NHS and they all sound very interesting. There's only a couple that I know for certain I wouldn't want to do.
    When i started i thought i wanted to do A&E. Now that is probably the very last speciality I'd think of.

    Conversely, elderly care always seemed terrible to me as a med student - what with all your patients being confused etc - but now i actually see the rewarding aspects and right up there.

    I also started with quite a childish 'i would never do gynae' attitude and although i still won't be doing gynae, actually i view it as a good varied speciality with very interesting mix of medicine and surgery, emergencies and elective work.

    I wouldn't rule out anything just yet!
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    My main interests in med school were anaesthetics and A&E because they were the most interesting placements with the friendliest consultants and you got to do a lot of clerking and procedures. Anything which involved standing around for hours in theatre or at the back of a five hour ward round was pretty dull in comparison.
    Isn't A&E supposed to be one of the most stressful specialities? I imagine there's a lot of doom and gloom involved. E.g. people being rushed into hospital with motorcycle accidents and other horrendous things.

    [/QUOTE]

    (Original post by Democracy)

    However, being a registrar or a consultant isn't like being a med student or an FY1/SHO. You won't just be observing from the back or doing boring stuff all the time, so I think it's important to look ahead to what the more senior people in the specialty do on a day to day basis before ruling things out too soon.
    I've watched some documentaries about foundation year doctors and their work seems to be very rushed. As in they don't spend much time with their patients and they have lots of paper work to do.

    (Original post by Democracy)
    That said, you have to draw your line somewhere. My idea of a definite no specialty would be something like endocrinology where the ward/take seems to be in a constant state of chaos and you get dumped on endlessly with inordinate amounts of paperwork, board rounds, end of life conversations, learning in nibbles etc. I don't care how interesting being an endocrinology consultant is, the journey to get there is just not worth it for me.
    That sounds horrible. But its a bit disappointing because endocrinology is one of the things that got me interested in medicine. I thought endocrinologists deal with people who have hormone problems and diabetes. E.g. diabetes and hypogonadism. I find the latter pretty interesting, especially on how it influences behaviour in men. Maybe urologists would deal with the latter more than endocrinologists, idk really.
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    :rofl3:

    I :love: neurology!
    What are the main conditions neurology deals with? Alzheimer's disease? Down syndrome? Epilepsy?
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    (Original post by Blazingphoenix)
    I started chasing medicine wanting to go into pathology because I watched too much CSI

    Did some work experience and added GP and A&E to my interests.

    Went into med school. At the moment put off by pathology (so interesting, but I nearly threw up because of the smell :sick: so I'll need to build a better stomach for it) and psych (I just don't know how I'll deal because I keep thinking I have symptoms while I'm being taught them), still interested by GP and A&E, added urology, anaesthetics and radiology to interests.

    But I'm only first year, so we'll see what happens.
    Is pathology mainly examining dead bodies? I don't think I know many people who go to med school with the dream of becoming a pathologists haha
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    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    What are the main conditions neurology deals with? Alzheimer's disease? Down syndrome? Epilepsy?
    https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...cine/neurology

    Neurologists treat conditions such as:
    • stroke
    • multiple sclerosis
    • headaches
    • blackouts
    • peripheral neuropathy (disease affecting the nerves) including chronic neuropathic pain
    • Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders (eg tremor)
    • Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia
    • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) also known as motor neuron disease. MND (causing weakness and muscle wasting due to nerve degeneration)
    • epilepsy
    • spinal cord diseases
    • muscle diseases like muscular dystrophy (causing weakness of muscle fibres)
    • myasthenia gravis (where the muscles become weak and tire easily) and related disorders
    • brain tumours
    • functional disorders (symptoms which cannot be explained by neurological damage)

    Over 5,000 neurological diseases have been identified.
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    When i started i thought i wanted to do A&E. Now that is probably the very last speciality I'd think of.

    Conversely, elderly care always seemed terrible to me as a med student - what with all your patients being confused etc - but now i actually see the rewarding aspects and right up there.

    I also started with quite a childish 'i would never do gynae' attitude and although i still won't be doing gynae, actually i view it as a good varied speciality with very interesting mix of medicine and surgery, emergencies and elective work.

    I wouldn't rule out anything just yet!
    Obgyn looks like a difficult speciality. But I always wonder if there will be some women who won't want to see a male gynaecologist. Thats what mainly puts me off it.
 
 
 
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