Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Warning-too lazy to correct grammar and structure so please just focus on the content thanks)

    So I applied to medicine at uea, southampton and bristol with a crap ukcat score (607.5 band 4), and fortunately got interviews from uea and southampton (both 6 years). Bristol rejected me for such a stupid reason they didn't even look at my application so I can't comment on that.

    I have some doubts. I keep seeing that southampton medicine isn't a great course but uea seems amazing judging by the stats. The problem is I don't want to waste a year doing a foundation year at uea if I get an offer and if I get AAA instead of BBB. I obviously want to enjoy my time at medical school and I've learnt I have the option to choose how it's taught instead of the traditional lecture type, but southampton seems to have that? I'm also not sure for PBL because right now in my a levels working with other people (in english literature) either makes me lazy or want to do it alone as the pace is too slow when with other people-but it depends on the group dynamic.

    I don't want to take a gap year, but I also was thinking of maybe reapplying but again there's no guarantee. I was thinking of applying to better unis but all I care about is me being satisfied and enjoying the course, I don't care about its prestige etc. I want to go somewhere where I'll actually feel really prepared as a junior doctor.

    Thoughts?
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    So do you already have offers for both?
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by geniequeen48)
    (Warning-too lazy to correct grammar and structure so please just focus on the content thanks)

    So I applied to medicine at uea, southampton and bristol with a crap ukcat score (607.5 band 4), and fortunately got interviews from uea and southampton (both 6 years). Bristol rejected me for such a stupid reason they didn't even look at my application so I can't comment on that.

    I have some doubts. I keep seeing that southampton medicine isn't a great course but uea seems amazing judging by the stats. The problem is I don't want to waste a year doing a foundation year at uea if I get an offer and if I get AAA instead of BBB. I obviously want to enjoy my time at medical school and I've learnt I have the option to choose how it's taught instead of the traditional lecture type, but southampton seems to have that? I'm also not sure for PBL because right now in my a levels working with other people (in english literature) either makes me lazy or want to do it alone as the pace is too slow when with other people-but it depends on the group dynamic.

    I don't want to take a gap year, but I also was thinking of maybe reapplying but again there's no guarantee. I was thinking of applying to better unis but all I care about is me being satisfied and enjoying the course, I don't care about its prestige etc. I want to go somewhere where I'll actually feel really prepared as a junior doctor.

    Thoughts?
    Sorry, where did you 'see' southampton medicine is a bad course?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Blazingphoenix)
    So do you already have offers for both?
    Oh no no no. I know I should be asking this if I got offers for both of course, but I just want to get it out of my mind. Or is it too early to ask?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Unistats-some low percentages, and some threads on thestudentroom.
    (Original post by Ginga)
    Sorry, where did you 'see' southampton medicine is a bad course?
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by geniequeen48)
    Oh no no no. I know I should be asking this if I got offers for both of course, but I just want to get it out of my mind. Or is it too early to ask?
    Well at least you're confident I guess.

    The thing is, once you have an offer there's a chance you can get in even if you don't get the grades. Not that I'm saying you won't but its always nice to have a safety net. And an offer is an offer, medicine is medicine. You're going to be qualified regardless.

    Like you said, there's no guarantee that if you take a gap year you'll get an offer next time. As blunt as it sounds, I would say that unless you KNOW a university isn't suited for you (e.g. Not medicine, but I know somebody who transferred university because they felt at risk in the city, another transferred due to family circumstances) then accept the offer. You'll adapt.

    (Original post by geniequeen48)
    Unistats-some low percentages, and some threads on thestudentroom.
    A quick google search suggests that Southampton changed their course a couple of years ago, so the stats might actually be reflecting the cohort who were the guinea pigs per se. Changing a new course is always hectic and it'll usually take a couple of years to settle. Also the internet is the internet, you can't always take it at face value. You should have an idea yourself from when you visited and the reason why you first applied.

    I myself am on a course that just had a curriculum overhaul. It is crazy, plus they are testing new systems too to aid us and test us in our learning, which is not quite helping. But I think with time they'll work out how to maximise all these new resources and it'll benefit the years that follow, but at the moment they are not quite there.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Blazingphoenix)
    Well at least you're confident I guess.

    The thing is, once you have an offer there's a chance you can get in even if you don't get the grades. Not that I'm saying you won't but its always nice to have a safety net. And an offer is an offer, medicine is medicine. You're going to be qualified regardless.

    Like you said, there's no guarantee that if you take a gap year you'll get an offer next time. As blunt as it sounds, I would say that unless you KNOW a university isn't suited for you (e.g. Not medicine, but I know somebody who transferred university because they felt at risk in the city, another transferred due to family circumstances) then accept the offer. You'll adapt.



    A quick google search suggests that Southampton changed their course a couple of years ago, so the stats might actually be reflecting the cohort who were the guinea pigs per se. Changing a new course is always hectic and it'll usually take a couple of years to settle. Also the internet is the internet, you can't always take it at face value. You should have an idea yourself from when you visited and the reason why you first applied.

    I myself am on a course that just had a curriculum overhaul. It is crazy, plus they are testing new systems too to aid us and test us in our learning, which is not quite helping. But I think with time they'll work out how to maximise all these new resources and it'll benefit the years that follow, but at the moment they are not quite there.
    Thank you, your post was really helpful and instructive.
    •  Official Rep
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
     Official Rep
    Hi @geniequeen48

    I'm currently a 3rd year at UEA so hopefully I can clear a few things up for you

    Just some clarification regarding your application - our course (A100) here is only 5 years with an option to intercalate (do an extra degree) making it 6 years or did you apply for the foundation year programme? (A101)

    I was exactly the same as you when it came to PBL; I was unsure whether I wanted to work with others or just do all of my own work because of my previous experience with 'lazy' individuals in school but when you come to medical school everyone in the cohort is enthusiastic, motivated to do well and learn so it works out really well.
    Another misconception about PBL is that it's group work throughout the entire course but it definitely isn't! We still have lectures throughout the week with the entire year group and our PBL groups meet twice a week (once to go over that week's learning objectives for the module you're on and then to your primary care placements where it's more of a patient based approach rather than working with each other - although you may practice things like examination or taking a history)

    I hope this helps and please feel free to ask anymore questions!

    Task UEA Official UG Rep
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: March 3, 2018
Poll
Do you think parents should charge rent?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.