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    So firstly what evidence do I need to send? I have autism and was diagnosed at age 19, I still have the ADI-R report used to diagnose me. However although it goes into some of my difficulties (or what my mother reported anyway, which wasn't all of it) it doesn't really say how it effects studying or learning. If I need to get a letter from the doctor how do I go about doing it, do I make a normal appointment and take in the form or do I ring up and say I need the doctor to fill in a form.

    This is mostly for my curiosity (since I was diagnosed at 19) but it mentioned about having to have a new diagnosis for some disabilities if it was originally done under the age of 16, is this the case for autism? Do they have to have a re diagnosis or can it just be a doctor's letter confirming they still have x disability.

    What's the assessment like? I'm in the process/war of trying to get PIP, I'm worried it's a similar thing where they are completely working against me or think I can manage fine. What sort of things do they ask in the assessment? Do they tell me on the day what I will be getting or do I have to wait for a letter to tell me.

    For other people who have ASD, what do/did you get? I'm doing computer science if that makes a difference.
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    (Original post by Days_H)
    So firstly what evidence do I need to send? I have autism and was diagnosed at age 19, I still have the ADI-R report used to diagnose me. However although it goes into some of my difficulties (or what my mother reported anyway, which wasn't all of it) it doesn't really say how it effects studying or learning. If I need to get a letter from the doctor how do I go about doing it, do I make a normal appointment and take in the form or do I ring up and say I need the doctor to fill in a form.

    This is mostly for my curiosity (since I was diagnosed at 19) but it mentioned about having to have a new diagnosis for some disabilities if it was originally done under the age of 16, is this the case for autism? Do they have to have a re diagnosis or can it just be a doctor's letter confirming they still have x disability.

    What's the assessment like? I'm in the process/war of trying to get PIP, I'm worried it's a similar thing where they are completely working against me or think I can manage fine. What sort of things do they ask in the assessment? Do they tell me on the day what I will be getting or do I have to wait for a letter to tell me.

    For other people who have ASD, what do/did you get? I'm doing computer science if that makes a difference.
    Dsa isn't like benefit assessments they aren't there to catch you out , the nerds assessment is more like a chat to figure out what would help you best. I think you could need a letter that says X's autism affects her ability to study because ... You can ask exactly what evidence you ll need.
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    There's a form you can print out and get your doctor to fill in. Your doctor might charge you for this, but it can't be claimed back from SFE as the onus is on you to provide medical evidence. This form can then be sent to Student Finance as evidence of your disability and how it affects your ability to carry out daily living tasks. Here's a link:

    https://www.gold.ac.uk/media/documen...dence-Form.pdf
 
 
 
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