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Any Fun/Coincidental Aspects Of Maths? watch

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    Are there any fun things about maths that can apply to everyday life, or just pure coincidences?

    What I mean by this is take the value of 10! (factorial). It is exactly equal to the amount of seconds in 6 weeks.

    Does anyone know of any other things like this?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Y11_Maths)
    Are there any fun things about maths that can apply to everyday life, or just pure coincidences?

    What I mean by this is take the value of 10! (factorial). It is exactly equal to the amount of seconds in 6 weeks.

    Does anyone know of any other things like this?

    Thanks
    The Fibonacci sequence can be used to approximately convert km to miles.

    1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, ...

    So approximately 8 miles = 13 km and 13 miles = 21 km etc.
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    (Original post by Notnek)
    The Fibonacci sequence can be used to approximately convert km to miles.

    1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, ...

    So approximately 13 miles = 8 km and 21 miles = 13 km.
    Oh wow that’s pretty neat, thanks! Are there any websites where more of these can be found? Because I don’t even know how one finds out about these in the first place, my teacher told me about 10!
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    Not quite the same but I'm fascinated by these 'romanesque cauliflowers'. Nature is just amazing, maths too.

    https://parade.com/wp-content/upload...anesco-ftr.jpg


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    (Original post by phys981)
    Not quite the same but I'm fascinated by these 'romanesque cauliflowers'. Nature is just amazing, maths too.

    https://parade.com/wp-content/upload...anesco-ftr.jpg
    Bit of a tangent but nice cauliflowers!
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    (Original post by Y11_Maths)
    Bit of a tangent
    Kind of, but aren't these patterns all related to fibonacci? They're just amazing.


    Found a link http://www.odditycentral.com/pics/fi...vegetable.html
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    The answer to the universe is 42.
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    (Original post by HateOCR)
    The answer to the universe is 42.
    Don’t forget to life and everything too! I think everyone knows this one but thanks for sharing 😂
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    (Original post by Y11_Maths)
    Don’t forget to life and everything too! I think everyone knows this one but thanks for sharing 😂
    Oh no they don’t trust me.
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    This also links to Fibonacci numbers- let n be a positive integer. If either 5n^2+4 or 5n^2-4 is a square (or both) then n is a term in the Fibonacci sequence. Also, the converse holds true: that is, if n is a Fibonacci number then either 5n^2+4 or 5n^2-4 (or both) is a square
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    -40°c = -40°f
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    (Original post by psc---maths)
    This also links to Fibonacci numbers- let n be a positive integer. If either 5n^2+4 or 5n^2-4 is a square (or both) then n is a term in the Fibonacci sequence. Also, the converse holds true: that is, if n is a Fibonacci number then either 5n^2+4 or 5n^2-4 (or both) is a square
    Whoah I really like this one, thanks for sharing!
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    (Original post by MR1999)
    -40°c = -40°f
    Yeah this ones a weird one, thanks for posting
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    Linking the two most famous constants:

    \pi^4 +\pi^5 \approx e^6

    Up to an accuracy of 10^-6. Pure coincidence though I think?
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    (Original post by Notnek)
    Linking the two most famous constants:

    \pi^4 +\pi^5 \approx e^6

    Up to an accuracy of 10^-6. Pure coincidence though.
    Wow, that’s fantastic!
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    (Original post by Y11_Maths)
    Whoah I really like this one, thanks for sharing!
    Another interesting fact about the fibonnaci sequence...

    Define the Fibonacci sequence as follows-

    F(1)=1
    F(2)=2
    F(n+1)=F(n)+F(n-1) for all n greater than or equal to 2.

    If you want to find the greatest common divisor of two terms of the Fibonacci sequence- say F(m) and F(n): that is

    GCD{F(m),F(n)}

    The value of this is

    F(GCD(m,n))

    For example if you wanted to find the greatest common divisor of the 12th and 18 Fibonacci numbers: 144 and 2584 respectively then the greatest common divisor of these two numbers is in fact 8, which is the 6th Fibonacci number. and gcd(12,18)=6.

    As a more difficult to imagine example: the greatest common divisor of f(66) and f(300) is actually also 8 which is f(6) and gcd(66,300)=6
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    (Original post by MR1999)
    -40°c = -40°f
    Also 16ºC = 61F and 28ºC = 82F
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    There are 'as many' positive integers as there are fractions.
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    (Original post by phys981)
    Also 16ºC = 61F and 28ºC = 82F
    Not bad at all
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    (Original post by psc---maths)
    Another interesting fact about the fibonnaci sequence...

    Define the Fibonacci sequence as follows-

    F(1)=1
    F(2)=2
    F(n+1)=F(n)+F(n-1) for all n greater than or equal to 2.

    If you want to find the greatest common divisor of two terms of the Fibonacci sequence- say F(m) and F(n): that is

    GCD{F(m),F(n)}

    The value of this is

    F(GCD(m,n))

    For example if you wanted to find the greatest common divisor of the 12th and 18 Fibonacci numbers: 144 and 2584 respectively then the greatest common divisor of these two numbers is in fact 8, which is the 6th Fibonacci number. and gcd(12,18)=6.

    As a more difficult to imagine example: the greatest common divisor of f(66) and f(300) is actually also 8 which is f(6) and gcd(66,300)=6
    Wow that’s insane. You guys really love your Fibonnacci sequences haha
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