Turn on thread page Beta

Warwick or LSE? Not such an obvious choice… watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I am having another first world problem. I am currently a paralegal wanting to become a human rights/ civil liberties solicitor. I have been accepted by Warwick for LLM in Int Development Law and Human Rights and for Msc in HR at LSE (regrettably not LLM, although at Msc they let you to take some modules from the law school).
    I want to do masters to boost up my CV but mainly for my own personal satisfaction and intellectual challenge. I know that having an LLM does not directly translate into better job opportunities, but, as I said it’s one of those things in life that have always been my dream.

    Now, I am not sure which uni to choose: Warwick is cheaper (£8k), has a very interesting curriculum, has an advantage of being an LLM and is based in campus outside London with significantly lower costs of living than in the capital. On the other side, LSE has a world-wide reputation, only, I am not certain if it justifies the costs (£15k), obviously much higher living costs and the pain of everyday commuting.
    I would be self-funding the course (mostly likely with a bank loan) as I am not eligible for the postgrad SF loan and I was not awarded any scholarship at LSE (Warwick remains to be seen but competition is fierce so I am being realistic it may also be the case).

    I would be grateful for any insight, in particular from people who have done either of those two courses and those who can comment on their overall reputation. I feel like my heart is saying Warwick but my ego is saying LSE.

    Thank you in advance.
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    LSE.... opens you up to another world...


    Warwick... ugh im not a fan of the overblown valuations. Its just another Russell group, just because they require one letter more at Undergrad on offers doesnt make then that much more elite.

    They offer places with same frequency as my uni Nottingham and seem to be risen up on some pestal of superior teaching.

    Its not the case.

    LSE has a global name synonomous with elite,

    You leave this country people will have likely heard very little of Warwick.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 7Anita7)
    I am having another first world problem. I am currently a paralegal wanting to become a human rights/ civil liberties solicitor. I have been accepted by Warwick for LLM in Int Development Law and Human Rights and for Msc in HR at LSE (regrettably not LLM, although at Msc they let you to take some modules from the law school).
    I want to do masters to boost up my CV but mainly for my own personal satisfaction and intellectual challenge. I know that having an LLM does not directly translate into better job opportunities, but, as I said it’s one of those things in life that have always been my dream.

    Now, I am not sure which uni to choose: Warwick is cheaper (£8k), has a very interesting curriculum, has an advantage of being an LLM and is based in campus outside London with significantly lower costs of living than in the capital. On the other side, LSE has a world-wide reputation, only, I am not certain if it justifies the costs (£15k), obviously much higher living costs and the pain of everyday commuting.
    I would be self-funding the course (mostly likely with a bank loan) as I am not eligible for the postgrad SF loan and I was not awarded any scholarship at LSE (Warwick remains to be seen but competition is fierce so I am being realistic it may also be the case).

    I would be grateful for any insight, in particular from people who have done either of those two courses and those who can comment on their overall reputation. I feel like my heart is saying Warwick but my ego is saying LSE.

    Thank you in advance.
    Development Law is very different to Human Rights-related stuff. Go with the course you prefer.

    You'll be commuting into Warwick Uni anyway, given that you can't live anywhere remotely near campus. It's a matter of cost.

    What field are you going into? If it's volunteering or NGO work, whatever rep difference there might be isn't worth the extra cost.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JohanGRK)
    Development Law is very different to Human Rights-related stuff. Go with the course you prefer.

    You'll be commuting into Warwick Uni anyway, given that you can't live anywhere remotely near campus. It's a matter of cost.

    What field are you going into? If it's volunteering or NGO work, whatever rep difference there might be isn't worth the extra cost.
    My understanding is that Warwick offers LLM which combines Int development and HR which particularly appealed to me. Why do you say i would not be able to live on campus? I thought postgrad students can get on campus accommodation...

    I will be going into practice, I've got my LPC almost finished. So I am looking at the reputation of those unis from practitioners' point of view (if, any).
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 7Anita7)
    My understanding is that Warwick offers LLM which combines Int development and HR which particularly appealed to me. Why do you say i would not be able to live on campus? I thought postgrad students can get on campus accommodation...

    I will be going into practice, I've got my LPC almost finished. So I am looking at the reputation of those unis from practitioners' point of view (if, any).
    Undergrads have to move out in second year. Didn't know that the policy was different for postgrads.

    If you like the Warwick course, go for it. You might find it more useful in your line of work, and chances are that you'll be happier studying it during the year.

    Not much of a difference tbh. LSE may have had more of a name boost back home if you were a non-UK student.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    My insight is that you appear to be a paralegal without a TC who has apparently self-funded the LPC and is preparing to self-fund a masters. There is also no such thing as a "human rights solicitor". Human rights is a subset within criminal and public law. The fact you do not appear to know this is worrying.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by flatlined)
    My insight is that you appear to be a paralegal without a TC who has apparently self-funded the LPC and is preparing to self-fund a masters. There is also no such thing as a "human rights solicitor". Human rights is a subset within criminal and public law. The fact you do not appear to know this is worrying.

    haha that made me laugh
    Whilst I appreciate your concerns about my future, please note that in this thread I am not asking for an opinion whether I should go back to uni but which uni to pick, out of two offers. As I have outlined, I am not doing an LLM to boost up my TC chances/ career opportunities but because I want to. Simples.

    And yes, there are firms specialising in HR-related work: Bindmans, Leigh Day, HJA, to name a few.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 7Anita7)
    haha that made me laugh
    Whilst I appreciate your concerns about my future, please note that in this thread I am not asking for an opinion whether I should go back to uni but which uni to pick, out of two offers. As I have outlined, I am not doing an LLM to boost up my TC chances/ career opportunities but because I want to. Simples.

    And yes, there are firms specialising in HR-related work: Bindmans, Leigh Day, HJA, to name a few.
    There is no such thing as a human rights solicitor. They do criminal or public law work, HR is a subset within. I know very well what I am talking about. No one at Bindmans exclusively or nearly exclusively does discrimination cases, there are public lawyers whose bread and butter and best paid work will be regulatory work, professional disciplinary, actions against public bodies for not following correct procedures e.g. in relation to planning or healthcare consultations, and every now and then they do an action against a public body re a discriminatory policy. It is a subset of the field.

    As I say, this is worrying and I am merely pointing this out. I realise I am not answering your question, but self-funding an LLM is a lot of money. I'm not offering, but my immediate thought was if you paid me a fraction of that, I could regig your CV/application forms, train you up for interviews and get you a TC anywhere in the country.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by flatlined)
    There is no such thing as a human rights solicitor. They do criminal or public law work, HR is a subset within. I know very well what I am talking about. No one at Bindmans exclusively or nearly exclusively does discrimination cases, there are public lawyers whose bread and butter and best paid work will be regulatory work, professional disciplinary, actions against public bodies for not following correct procedures e.g. in relation to planning or healthcare consultations, and every now and then they do an action against a public body re a discriminatory policy. It is a subset of the field.

    As I say, this is worrying and I am merely pointing this out. I realise I am not answering your question, but self-funding an LLM is a lot of money. I'm not offering, but my immediate thought was if you paid me a fraction of that, I could regig your CV/application forms, train you up for interviews and get you a TC anywhere in the country.
    I suppose we just have to agree to disagree on the matter of LLM and it's usefulness. I think I have made it quite clear I am not looking for an investment or something that directly translates into a TC. I know that an LLM does not and I am ok with that.

    If you have any comments about either LSE or Warwick and their LLM programms I am happy to hear them out.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 7Anita7)
    I suppose we just have to agree to disagree on the matter of LLM and it's usefulness. I think I have made it quite clear I am not looking for an investment or something that directly translates into a TC. I know that an LLM does not and I am ok with that.

    If you have any comments about either LSE or Warwick and their LLM programms I am happy to hear them out.
    Go to Warwick. Cheaper, you don't want to work in financial services or city law, much better social life and the course is probably preferable.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by flatlined)
    Go to Warwick. Cheaper, you don't want to work in financial services or city law, much better social life and the course is probably preferable.
    thank you
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    What are your specific interests within the field of international human rights? If you have a critical stance, broadly understood, towards HR, LSE is one of the best places in the world to study. This is also the case if you have a particular interest in the relationship between human rights and gender, human rights and economic development, etc.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by bicmark)
    What are your specific interests within the field of international human rights? If you have a critical stance, broadly understood, towards HR, LSE is one of the best places in the world to study. This is also the case if you have a particular interest in the relationship between human rights and gender, human rights and economic development, etc.
    Yes, mainly gender and corporate responsibility. But, having said that, I am very keen to just dive into stuff I never heard of, to broaden my horizons.
    I know there is no escape from LSE's reputation. I think I have made that thread mainly to find out more about Warwick tbh
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 7Anita7)
    Yes, mainly gender and corporate responsibility. But, having said that, I am very keen to just dive into stuff I never heard of, to broaden my horizons.
    I know there is no escape from LSE's reputation. I think I have made that thread mainly to find out more about Warwick tbh
    Makes sense! I was speaking out of experience rather than reputation, though! And I can only say to you that, having somewhat similar interests, I love that place.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: March 6, 2018
Poll
Do you think parents should charge rent?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.