Turn on thread page Beta

What to say on CV/at interview for job if I plan to return to uni after 1 year? watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    I'm planning on taking a year out after my 2nd year finishes this summer in order to gain work experience (not placements) and take a break from studies.

    I want to ideally get a full-time entry level job so I can earn a decent amount of money for travelling after, but I'm only planning on working for just under a year as I'd return to uni after that. Should I mention this when applying and if so, how would I do it? I don't want to get rejected for saying that but I also don't want to "burn any bridges" when I leave.

    Would it be okay applying for any trainee positions seeing as they would expect me to continue for a few years after?
    • Very Important Poster
    Online

    19
    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by werdo1997)
    I'm planning on taking a year out after my 2nd year finishes this summer in order to gain work experience (not placements) and take a break from studies.

    I want to ideally get a full-time entry level job so I can earn a decent amount of money for travelling after, but I'm only planning on working for just under a year as I'd return to uni after that. Should I mention this when applying and if so, how would I do it? I don't want to get rejected for saying that but I also don't want to "burn any bridges" when I leave.

    Would it be okay applying for any trainee positions seeing as they would expect me to continue for a few years after?
    If it is a trainee position and tour CV shows year one at uni, then they will ask.

    You dont have to tell them if its just a junior trainee, but imo I wouldnt go wasting their time saying i was staying when I was not.

    If it was just a junior job then I might not even mention uni and apply as a normal job.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 999tigger)
    If it is a trainee position and tour CV shows year one at uni, then they will ask.

    You dont have to tell them if its just a junior trainee, but imo I wouldnt go wasting their time saying i was staying when I was not.

    If it was just a junior job then I might not even mention uni and apply as a normal job.
    So I shouldn't mention that I'm a student on my CV? How will I explain a 2 year gap after A levels then?
    • Very Important Poster
    Online

    19
    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by werdo1997)
    So I shouldn't mention that I'm a student on my CV? How will I explain a 2 year gap after A levels then?
    A trainee job is ok, but one that takes a lot of investment, then they will raise questions. You are going to have to work out what your answer is going to be. If you just get a job yo are qualified for then they might not care whether you stay or go. Most people would take a perm job and then just hand their notice in.

    If you say I only want a temp job for a year, then that makes it easier to leave, but maybe there are fewer of those.

    Apply for jobs and see how it pans out.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I think it's best to be as honest as you can. Have you a formal agreement to go back after a year out? If so I would say you will give the job your all for a year and then youre going back. There may well be situations where this suits. If your return is not yet formalised I think you can be more vague explaining that you want a break and good work experience and if probed that once you've learnt a lot in the world at work you will decide what the next step for your career is.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 999tigger)
    A trainee job is ok, but one that takes a lot of investment, then they will raise questions. You are going to have to work out what your answer is going to be. If you just get a job yo are qualified for then they might not care whether you stay or go. Most people would take a perm job and then just hand their notice in.

    If you say I only want a temp job for a year, then that makes it easier to leave, but maybe there are fewer of those.

    Apply for jobs and see how it pans out.
    I see, I guess I should look for other types of non-trainee jobs too.

    (Original post by Zarek)
    I think it's best to be as honest as you can. Have you a formal agreement to go back after a year out? If so I would say you will give the job your all for a year and then youre going back. There may well be situations where this suits. If your return is not yet formalised I think you can be more vague explaining that you want a break and good work experience and if probed that once you've learnt a lot in the world at work you will decide what the next step for your career is.
    I don't have a formal agreement yet as I'm still not 100% sure I want to take a year out. Regarding your last sentence, I think being vague about my future plans seems like a good idea. I think I'll do that.
    • Very Important Poster
    Online

    19
    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by werdo1997)
    I see, I guess I should look for other types of non-trainee jobs too.



    I don't have a formal agreement yet as I'm still not 100% sure I want to take a year out. Regarding your last sentence, I think being vague about my future plans seems like a good idea. I think I'll do that.
    Just go for the jobs and see what you get offered.
    If you have uni on your cv, then be prepared to answer questions about why you are interrupting studies and when you intend to return. Some contracts are fixed term so they wont care.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Just go for the jobs and see what you get offered.
    If you have uni on your cv, then be prepared to answer questions about why you are interrupting studies and when you intend to return. Some contracts are fixed term so they wont care.
    Okay, thanks for the advice. One more question if you don't mind, what do I call myself in my personal statement? A student? Or a school leaver? Or former university student?
    • Very Important Poster
    Online

    19
    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by werdo1997)
    Okay, thanks for the advice. One more question if you don't mind, what do I call myself in my personal statement? A student? Or a school leaver? Or former university student?
    Depends

    A student? Would you still consider yourself a student?
    Or a school leaver? If that is the impression you want to give.
    Or former university student?Which suggests you will state uni and that you left permanently.

    Not sure you have to say anything at all. Sometimes you can describe yourself by your skills or last qualifications.

    Doonesbury is online as well as princepieman so you can ask them how they would present it. Mt only points are decide, dont lie and look at it from the employers point of view plus be prepared to answer questions.

    If you present yourself as a student mid uni then they may want to know why and how long you will be around. Some jobs they wont care and others they will. That is just common sense. Just plan ahead so you dont create problems for yourself.

    Doonesbury may be kind enough to give you a shorter answer.....
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by werdo1997)
    I'm planning on taking a year out after my 2nd year finishes this summer in order to gain work experience (not placements) and take a break from studies.

    I want to ideally get a full-time entry level job so I can earn a decent amount of money for travelling after, but I'm only planning on working for just under a year as I'd return to uni after that. Should I mention this when applying and if so, how would I do it? I don't want to get rejected for saying that but I also don't want to "burn any bridges" when I leave.

    Would it be okay applying for any trainee positions seeing as they would expect me to continue for a few years after?
    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Doonesbury may be kind enough to give you a shorter answer.....
    OP, you are a student because you are planning to return to university. You are looking for an entry-level role, it's not a issue and is a straightforward and honest statement of your situation.

    And it's not uncommon for a "year in industry" employer to offer you a full-time role for when you graduate if you've done well with them.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Depends

    A student? Would you still consider yourself a student?
    Or a school leaver? If that is the impression you want to give.
    Or former university student?Which suggests you will state uni and that you left permanently.

    Not sure you have to say anything at all. Sometimes you can describe yourself by your skills or last qualifications.

    Doonesbury is online as well as princepieman so you can ask them how they would present it. Mt only points are decide, dont lie and look at it from the employers point of view plus be prepared to answer questions.

    If you present yourself as a student mid uni then they may want to know why and how long you will be around. Some jobs they wont care and others they will. That is just common sense. Just plan ahead so you dont create problems for yourself.

    Doonesbury may be kind enough to give you a shorter answer.....
    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    OP, you are a student because you are planning to return to university. You are looking for an entry-level role, it's not a issue and is a straightforward and honest statement of your situation.

    And it's not uncommon for a "year in industry" employer to offer you a full-time role for when you graduate if you've done well with them.
    Thanks to both of you! I think I'll go ahead and be honest about my plans and say I'm a student then.
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by werdo1997)
    Thanks to both of you! I think I'll go ahead and be honest about my plans and say I'm a student then.
    Good plan.

    Edit: don't define yourself as "a student". It's not important, unless you are specifically asked the question.
    • Community Assistant
    • CV Helper
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    CV Helper
    (Original post by werdo1997)
    I'm planning on taking a year out after my 2nd year finishes this summer in order to gain work experience (not placements) and take a break from studies.

    I want to ideally get a full-time entry level job so I can earn a decent amount of money for travelling after, but I'm only planning on working for just under a year as I'd return to uni after that. Should I mention this when applying and if so, how would I do it? I don't want to get rejected for saying that but I also don't want to "burn any bridges" when I leave.

    Would it be okay applying for any trainee positions seeing as they would expect me to continue for a few years after?
    You should be looking for either one year schemes like YINI or fixed-term contracts. The point isn't that you want full time work, it's that you only want to work for a year. Apply for fixed term jobs then the whole return to University isn't an issue.

    It doesn't make any sense for an employer to take you on a formal training course, if you are going back to Uni, as they have no legal mechanism for getting you to come back and give them a return on their investment.

    (Original post by werdo1997)
    Okay, thanks for the advice. One more question if you don't mind, what do I call myself in my personal statement? A student? Or a school leaver? Or former university student?
    The document that accompanies a CV or job application is a covering letter and you don't 'call yourself' anything in that format. You simply answer the implicit questions Why do you want to do this sort of work? Why do you want to work for this organisation? and Why would you be good at it?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Good plan.

    Edit: don't define yourself as "a student". It's not important, unless you are specifically asked the question.
    Understood.

    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    You should be looking for either one year schemes like YINI or fixed-term contracts. The point isn't that you want full time work, it's that you only want to work for a year. Apply for fixed term jobs then the whole return to University isn't an issue.

    It doesn't make any sense for an employer to take you on a formal training course, if you are going back to Uni, as they have no legal mechanism for getting you to come back and give them a return on their investment.



    The document that accompanies a CV or job application is a covering letter and you don't 'call yourself' anything in that format. You simply answer the implicit questions Why do you want to do this sort of work? Why do you want to work for this organisation? and Why would you be good at it?
    I'll look into fixed-term contracts too. What I meant by "personal statement" was the short paragraph at the top of my CV, not a cover letter.
    • Community Assistant
    • CV Helper
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    CV Helper
    (Original post by werdo1997)
    Understood.



    I'll look into fixed-term contracts too. What I meant by "personal statement" was the short paragraph at the top of my CV, not a cover letter.
    You shouldn't have one of those. They are designed by folks like Connexions to make life easier for them. Employers completely ignore them (except they can be really funny sometimes) and all they do is waste valuable space in your CV. A CV is already a summary document and it doesn't need any further summary, just crack on with your education. When you have 5 or more years of professional experience in a single career path, then a few bullet points to lead off can indicate the role you play in a professional team, but before that, it's just a waste of space.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    You shouldn't have one of those. They are designed by folks like Connexions to make life easier for them. Employers completely ignore them (except they can be really funny sometimes) and all they do is waste valuable space in your CV. A CV is already a summary document and it doesn't need any further summary, just crack on with your education. When you have 5 or more years of professional experience in a single career path, then a few bullet points to lead off can indicate the role you play in a professional team, but before that, it's just a waste of space.
    Wow, I always thought they were necessary, even my careers team encouraged one :curious:. Alright, I'll focus on the other parts of my CV.
 
 
 

University open days

  1. Norwich University of the Arts
    Postgraduate Open Days Postgraduate
    Thu, 19 Jul '18
  2. University of Sunderland
    Postgraduate Open Day Postgraduate
    Thu, 19 Jul '18
  3. Plymouth College of Art
    All MA Programmes Postgraduate
    Thu, 19 Jul '18
Poll
Is the Big Bang theory correct?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.