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Losing Scottish accent and Scottish identity watch

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    (Original post by TrelaiBoy)
    London is a ridiculously expensive place to live, especially anywhere decent. Housing especially is very expensive

    Changing your accent won't make you fit in more and lying about being English wouldn't either. To be brutally honest if you lied about being from England and changed your accent to match it (which would be pretty difficult) it would alienate you more from your colleagues than just saying; "I'm from Glasgow"
    Would they ever need to know about me being from Scotland though?
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    (Original post by Joe2001)
    Cumbria is essentially an English Scotland though, and isn't as accessible as other places. I'm not a fan of the north of England either, give me the south any day.
    If you told anybody who lived there that they'd feed you to their sheep. But fair, if you're one of those south fetishists then w/e
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    (Original post by Pantsu)
    Literally every single person I know from glasgow is gay. I'm not even exaggerating, once you reach a certain age your whole friend group becomes overwhelmingly queer with people you knew from school coming out and people you meet along the way picking up that hey, this guy's one of us. Glasgow's gay scene might not be as big as London's, but it's there and it's not going anywhere.

    Your other reasons just seem to be a long list of internalised self hatred about your identity and where you come from. I'm not going to try and convince you to love your hometown, plenty of people have a complicated relationship with where they grew up, but you might want to re-examine why you feel so strongly repulsed by your own voice and culture. I doubt that's something you put on yourself with no outside influence.

    At the end of the day you're free to identify however you want, and there's nothing stopping you from rejecting scotland completely and setting up home somewhere else. But wouldn't it be nicer not to hate part of yourself for no real reason? You can acknowledge where you came from without self loathing or mindless patriotism. There's a happy medium and you'll probably feel better if you tackle the root cause of your feelings instead of just running away and pretending to be someone else.
    I've lived in the city for years, and it is devoid of gayness. Nothing to offer gay people. It's just full of straight men and their crappy obsession with football and Celtic vs Rangers. Never actually met an openly gay person before, in real life.
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    (Original post by Retired_Messiah)
    If you told anybody who lived there that they'd feed you to their sheep. But fair, if you're one of those south fetishists then w/e
    I'm not a "fetishist". Not going that far.
    Just a matter of personal taste. I was in Penrith once and really wasn't impressed.
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    (Original post by Joe2001)
    I am certainly going to be the person who I want to be, but to do that, I think that leaving Glasgow and my roots behind is the best option. You only live once!
    go for it then! 😊
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    (Original post by Joe2001)
    I've lived in the city for years, and it is devoid of gayness. Nothing to offer gay people. It's just full of straight men and their crappy obsession with football and Celtic vs Rangers. Never actually met an openly gay person before, in real life.
    Am I right in assuming you're still quite young? Because i didn't meet openly gay folk til I was in my 20s because it's still cripplingly uncool for kids to be honest about their feelings, for some reason. But now everyone and their mother is gay and life is pretty ****ing grand. Also, googling for like two seconds pulls up guide after guide of glasgow's gay scene. I suggest if you're old enough that you go and check it out. It's honestly a different experience walking into a gay bar after sitting through the heteronormative shite you hear in every other pub. It feels like coming home.
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    (Original post by Pantsu)
    Am I right in assuming you're still quite young? Because i didn't meet openly gay folk til I was in my 20s because it's still cripplingly uncool for kids to be honest about their feelings, for some reason. But now everyone and their mother is gay and life is pretty ****ing grand. Also, googling for like two seconds pulls up guide after guide of glasgow's gay scene. I suggest if you're old enough that you go and check it out. It's honestly a different experience walking into a gay bar after sitting through the heteronormative shite you hear in every other pub. It feels like coming home.
    Yeah - I'm 16. Not out to anyone, and possibly too young so the gay scene might not be an option. Even then, I am attracted to English accents so probably won't explore the Glasgow gay scene and will wait until uni.

    As for the last two sentences in bold - these are experiences which I am craving. Certainly fed up of heteronormativity and ready to get out and meet gay people for once.
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    (Original post by Joe2001)
    Would they ever need to know about me being from Scotland though?
    Presumably there are application forms. i.e. Place of birth and the like.

    Its honestly not worth it mate. Changing your accent and claiming your from another country won't help you fit in. You seem hung up on this weird idea that being Scottish brings baggage, it doesn't.
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    (Original post by Joe2001)
    Yeah - I'm 16. Not out to anyone, and possibly too young so the gay scene might not be an option. Even then, I am attracted to English accents so probably won't explore the Glasgow gay scene and will wait until uni.

    As for the last two sentences in bold - these are experiences which I am craving. Certainly fed up of heteronormativity and ready to get out and meet gay people for once.
    Oh man, you should come to glasgow pride this year before you head off to uni. It's family friendly and a good opportunity to just soak in the rainbows and be around other queer folk. I made the commute in for it last year and it was a great time. Or, if you're looking for some posh english boys, plenty of them studying here in Edinburgh, maybe try edinburgh pride instead.

    Also, you might be interested to know that there's an LGBT Youth Scotland organisation that does meetups and days out etc. for young folk. They also have counselling which is always helpful. https://www.lgbtyouth.org.uk/glasgow
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    (Original post by Pantsu)
    Oh man, you should come to glasgow pride this year before you head off to uni. It's family friendly and a good opportunity to just soak in the rainbows and be around other queer folk. I made the commute in for it last year and it was a great time. Or, if you're looking for some posh english boys, plenty of them studying here in Edinburgh, maybe try edinburgh pride instead.

    Also, you might be interested to know that there's an LGBT Youth Scotland organisation that does meetups and days out etc. for young folk. They also have counselling which is always helpful. https://www.lgbtyouth.org.uk/glasgow
    Off to uni next year.
    I was on the train into Glasgow last year on the same day as Pride. I really wanted to be there and see all of the rainbows. I would need to come out to my parents before I could go though. I'm well aware of LGBT Youth Scotland. I would absolutely LOVE to go to their meetups and events, but I have to get over the hurdle of coming out first. I can't just go out to a Pride festival or an LGBT meeting without a reason.
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    (Original post by TrelaiBoy)
    Presumably there are application forms. i.e. Place of birth and the like.

    Its honestly not worth it mate. Changing your accent and claiming your from another country won't help you fit in. You seem hung up on this weird idea that being Scottish brings baggage, it doesn't.
    Yes - there is some paperwork, which would presumably include nationality and place of birth.
    The teams on these ships are always very close with each other, and I don't want to be an outcast. I am not proud of being Scottish whatsoever and would still rather lie about it, as there is often many English ones who work in the entertainment on the ships. I'm being realistic - I think that there is nothing positive about being Scottish.
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    Losing your heritage is easy, filling the hole with something else is usually the more complicated part. Just take some professional speaking lessons and you are going to lose the rest of your accent soon enough. I just think you are connecting your Scottishness to more negative stereotypes than most people - Scots or not - usually do but hey, that's your decision.

    Otherwise - i am pretty sure you are wrong re: your assumption about Glasgow and its non-existent gay culture.
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    (Original post by Joe2001)
    Yes - there is some paperwork, which would presumably include nationality and place of birth.
    The teams on these ships are always very close with each other, and I don't want to be an outcast. I am not proud of being Scottish whatsoever and would still rather lie about it, as there is often many English ones who work in the entertainment on the ships. I'm being realistic - I think that there is nothing positive about being Scottish.
    You're really over estimating how much of an impact being Scottish would have. It would have little to no impact and no negative impact at all unless you were working with a group of xenophobes.

    That final statement is just nonsense
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    (Original post by Wellfish)
    Losing your heritage is easy, filling the hole with something else is usually the more complicated part. Just take some professional speaking lessons and you are going to lose the rest of your accent soon enough. I just think you are connecting your Scottishness to more negative stereotypes than most people - Scots or not - usually do but hey, that's your decision.

    Otherwise - i am pretty sure you are wrong re: your assumption about Glasgow and its non-existent gay culture.
    I just don't see it. It seems to not be very LGBT friendly and very heteronormative. Maybe I would think differently if I went to Pride, but that's not an option for me at the moment.

    The accent will be gone after some time. I won't get lessons, but rather just imitate how the others around me speak and pick up the dialect. It's like learning a new language, which I am not too bad at.
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    (Original post by TrelaiBoy)
    You're really over estimating how much of an impact being Scottish would have. It would have little to no impact and no negative impact at all unless you were working with a group of xenophobes.

    That final statement is just nonsense
    Cruise ships are the last place to worry about xenophobes, but I still don't want to identify as Scottish. It isn't a good thing, in my opinion.
    What is good about being Scottish? It's a colder poor man's England.

    It would be fair to say that I have Scottish cringe - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_cringe.
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    (Original post by Joe2001)
    Yes - there is some paperwork, which would presumably include nationality and place of birth.
    The teams on these ships are always very close with each other, and I don't want to be an outcast. I am not proud of being Scottish whatsoever and would still rather lie about it, as there is often many English ones who work in the entertainment on the ships. I'm being realistic - I think that there is nothing positive about being Scottish.
    They'll do background checks and stuff, they will know if you lie- your passport doesn't lie. The company will need the truth about you, of course you can easily tell co-workers that you are whatever nationality-but they do sometimes write passages about workers on board the ship such as .....from wherever.

    I don't understand why you're not proud, you clearly haven't experienced enough of the positives about being scottish-or you're choosing to ignore them
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    (Original post by AzureCeleste)
    They'll do background checks and stuff, they will know if you lie- your passport doesn't lie. The company will need the truth about you, of course you can easily tell co-workers that you are whatever nationality-but they do sometimes write passages about workers on board the ship such as .....from wherever.

    I don't understand why you're not proud, you clearly haven't experienced enough of the positives about being scottish-or you're choosing to ignore them
    I'm well aware of the passages about workers on the ships. I would simply ask them to say that I was born in Glasgow and to leave that there. Of course, I won't lie to any security officials as that would be foolish. It's mostly customers and colleagues whom I would cover my heritage up to.

    Let me ask you - what are the positives about being Scottish? Apart from Empire biscuits, haggis and black pudding.
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    (Original post by Joe2001)
    Cruise ships are the last place to worry about xenophobes, but I still don't want to identify as Scottish. It isn't a good thing, in my opinion.
    What is good about being Scottish? It's a colder poor man's England.

    It would be fair to say that I have Scottish cringe - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_cringe.
    What's so great about England in comparison? What is your issue with Scotland and why do you think England's any different?
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    Go live somewhere else and try to pick up a different accent.

    You do what you want. Can’t see why people are losing their **** over this.

    National identity is all fabricated nonsense anyway. You can be what you want.
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    (Original post by TrelaiBoy)
    What's so great about England in comparison? What is your issue with Scotland and why do you think England's any different?
    I'll paste the OP as it describes my issues with Scotland:
    1) Some of the areas around me are among the lowest in terms of life expectancy in the UK.
    2) Glasgow itself. A dull city and devoid of character. Especially Sauchiehall Street.
    3) Too many Glaswegians are intimidating, and some are even downright aggressive.
    4) Many of the areas (especially the suburbs) are very run down.
    5) Lack of gay community in Glasgow.
    6) The suburbs are full of overly religious people, especially my town. I can't be somewhere with too much religion, sorry.
    7) Accent - sounds tacky and low-class, IMO.
    8) Nothing interesting to do in the area - bored out of my mind during summer and weekends (when not working or on here).

    I much prefer England over Scotland. The people, the accent, the country itself. OK - there are much worse countries in the world than Scotland, but it is one of the bottom ones in Europe. Most successful Brits are English anyway.
 
 
 
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