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Losing Scottish accent and Scottish identity watch

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    (Original post by Thomazo)
    Go live somewhere else and try to pick up a different accent.

    You do what you want. Can’t see why people are losing their **** over this.

    National identity is all fabricated nonsense anyway. You can be what you want.
    Thank you!
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    Scottish cringe from Wiki:
    The Scottish cringe is a cultural cringe relating to Scotland, and claimed to exist by politicians and commentators.These cultural commentators claim that a sense of cultural inferiority is felt by many Scots, particularly in relation to a perceived dominance of English or anglocentric British culture, partly due to the importance of London, within the United Kingdom, and consequently a sense of Scottish resentment and underachievement. The cringe is said to manifest as feelings of low self-worth and embarrassment felt by Scottish people in response to overt expressions of Scottish cultural identity and heritage such as the Lowland Scots and Scottish Gaelic languages, and the kilt (see Tartanry).

    Sums up my feelings perfectly.
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    (Original post by Joe2001)
    I'll paste the OP as it describes my issues with Scotland:
    1) Some of the areas around me are among the lowest in terms of life expectancy in the UK.
    2) Glasgow itself. A dull city and devoid of character. Especially Sauchiehall Street.
    3) Too many Glaswegians are intimidating, and some are even downright aggressive.
    4) Many of the areas (especially the suburbs) are very run down.
    5) Lack of gay community in Glasgow.
    6) The suburbs are full of overly religious people, especially my town. I can't be somewhere with too much religion, sorry.
    7) Accent - sounds tacky and low-class, IMO.
    8) Nothing interesting to do in the area - bored out of my mind during summer and weekends (when not working or on here).

    I much prefer England over Scotland. The people, the accent, the country itself. OK - there are much worse countries in the world than Scotland, but it is one of the bottom ones in Europe. Most successful Brits are English anyway.
    I've answered them somewhere else, but: 1) Irrelevant, 2) Has been answered by others on this thread, 3) There are intimidating people everywhere, the most intimidated I've ever felt is in England, 4) Every city in the UK has very run down areas, especially London, 5) Covered by other people in this thread, 6) Understandable, 7) I find this genuinely baffling, "low-class" is a ridiculous thing to say and there's nothing wrong with working-class areas, 8) Covered by other people

    Scots that I've met tend to be amongst the friendliest I've ever met, there's loads of different English accents, Scotland has absolutely beautiful areas and, as mentioned, everywhere has run down areas. Mate, there's more successful English people due to population, there's a lot more of them so of course there will be more successful Englishmen than Scots. To be honest, proportionally, I'd say that Scots are just as, if not more successful than English people
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    (Original post by TrelaiBoy)
    Scots that I've met tend to be amongst the friendliest I've ever met, there's loads of different English accents, Scotland has absolutely beautiful areas and, as mentioned, everywhere has run down areas. Mate, there's more successful English people due to population, there's a lot more of them so of course there will be more successful Englishmen than Scots. To be honest, proportionally, I'd say that Scots are just as, if not more successful than English people
    Fair enough, but I don't think I will truly get over this mental block against it. I have only one chance at life, so why not do what I want with it? I understand all of your points, but I am still going to make an effort to rid myself of my Scottish background. My family are there, I will visit them a couple of times a year - that's all I will have to do with the country.

    Plus, a nice English voice is always attractive.
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    (Original post by Joe2001)
    Fair enough, but I don't think I will truly get over this mental block against it. I have only one chance at life, so why not do what I want with it? I understand all of your points, but I am still going to make an effort to rid myself of my Scottish background. My family are there, I will visit them a couple of times a year - that's all I will have to do with the country.

    Plus, a nice English voice is always attractive.
    I really fail to see why you think being Scottish somehow makes you some sort of second class citizen
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    (Original post by TrelaiBoy)
    I really fail to see why you think being Scottish somehow makes you some sort of second class citizen
    It's just how I feel. It's as if I desire to be something that I am not (i.e. English). With perseverance, it will work.

    I do feel subpar to the English. Everyone has something that they aren't proud of. I have many and my nationality is one of them.

    When do you ever hear of a famous Scottish person? You see English ones left, right and center.
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    Being Scottish isn't the only thing I dislike and want to change about myself. I keep visioning myself 10 years older and being a completely different person to who I am now. What I ultimately want is to be happy. I haven't had that for years and no-one actually knows how unhappy I have been. Everything has just hit me in the past 6 months.
    I suppose that I want to disconnect from my roots in order to start a fresh life.
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    Just walked through my town and my opinion has not changed. Full of tacky people and just run down. I just don't want to identify myself as being part of Scotland. I only live once, so why not be what I want? If I don't want to be Scottish, then I won't be Scottish, and no one on the ships will ever need to know (except for those handling passport details).
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    Move to Brighton.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...ulation-mapped
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    The large gay population in Brighton is definitely appealing and it is in the South of England, which is a bonus.
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    (Original post by Joe2001)
    The large gay population in Brighton is definitely appealing and it is in the South of England, which is a bonus.
    And they find a Scots accent particularly appealing...
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    And they find a Scots accent particularly appealing...
    Still not keeping the Scottish accent. It's not at all appealing and is a constant reminder of the place I come from.
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    OP, it sounds to me like you have quite low self-esteem and are subconsciously projecting it onto your Scottish / Glaswegian heritage. In other words, I wonder if the root of the problem is more of an internal issue (your own explorations of sexuality, identity, self-confidence etc) but that you are masking these by effectively blaming where you come from.

    Unfortunately, it is true that some people judge others by the way they speak, and there are prejudices particularly towards Northern accents (Teeside, Tyneside, Merseyside, Glaswegian etc). I think you can take some consolation from the fact that this issue affects a huge number of people, so you’re certainly not alone or in a unique situation. For people who do have strong, regional accents, it’s not about concealing them, but rather working positively with them. Some of the Scottish accents can be quite challenging for Southerners to fully comprehend (as can many other accents and dialects), so just make sure you speak slowly and avoid too much local slang when you talk with someone who isn’t local. There is no need to mask or apologise for your accent. Just try to keep it clear and accessible.

    If you are unhappy in Scotland, then certainly it may be a great thing to relocate somewhere like London. But this will only work if you are secure and happy in yourself. If you have unresolved internal conflicts, they will simply go with you. I myself grew up near London, and I remember my parents wanted a clean break / new start in the West Country because they felt they didn’t fit in back home. They would often speak of how everything would be better once we moved to somewhere where we would be more comfortable. When we did eventually make the move, a lot of our problems came with us. It certainly wasn’t the dream escape it had been billed as. What I am saying is, it seems from what I’ve read as though you have issues with your own identity. Moving half way across the UK won’t necessarily fix that. What will fix it is learning to accept where you come from and accept who you are. You can’t change it, so you are going to have to take ownership of the fact you are indeed Scottish. Only once you’ve achieved that, will a fresh start offer the possible escape you’re seeking.

    With regards losing the accent, you will find if you relocate that your accent will evolve. I used to have quite a posh Home Counties accent growing up, but it has become much less noticeable and decisively more Cornish since I moved here. I even find myself on occasion saying really Cornish phrases that have somehow seaped into my vocabulary. So you will soften your Glaswegian accent, but I think it’s unlikely you would ever truly lose it. And going back to my original point, why should you? Be proud of who you are.
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    (Original post by Citizenofpanem)
    OP, it sounds to me like you have quite low self-esteem and are subconsciously projecting it onto your Scottish / Glaswegian heritage. In other words, I wonder if the root of the problem is more of an internal issue (your own explorations of sexuality, identity, self-confidence etc) but that you are masking these by effectively blaming where you come from.
    I do lack confidence but the last 7 months have wrecked in any self-esteem that I ever had. I never have viewed Scotland in a positive light, and just don't want to associate with it.

    (Original post by Citizenofpanem)
    Unfortunately, it is true that some people judge others by the way they speak, and there are prejudices particularly toweards Northern accents (Teeside, Tyneside, Merseyside, Glaswegian etc). I think you can take some consolation from the fact that this issue affects a huge number of people, so you’re certainly not alone or in a unique situation. For people who do have strong, regional accents, it’s not about concealing them, but rather working positively with them. Some of the Scottish accents can be quite challenging for Southerners to fully comprehend (as can many other accents and dialects), so just make sure you speak slowly and avoid too much local slang when you talk with someone who isn’t local. There is no need to mask or apologise for your accent. Just try to keep it clear and accessible.
    I had a Maths teacher for 2 years who came from an area where there is a lot of Glaswegian slang and I picked up too much of the dialect. I absolutely hate the accent, and knowing that there are prejudices is another reason to get rid of it. I see no reason to keep it, and I certainly don't want to go onto cruise ships with my colleagues and customers knowing that I am from Glasgow. I also don't want people from university to know either. I just don't want people to know that I come from a city like Glasgow.

    (Original post by Citizenofpanem)
    If you are unhappy in Scotland, then certainly it may be a great thing to relocate somewhere like London. But this will only work if you are secure and happy in yourself. If you have unresolved internal conflicts, they will simply go with you. I myself grew up near London, and I remember my parents wanted a clean break / new start in the West Country because they felt they didn’t fit in back home. They would often speak of how everything would be better once we moved to somewhere where we would be more comfortable. When we did eventually make the move, a lot of our problems came with us. It certainly wasn’t the dream escape it had been billed as. What I am saying is, it seems from what I’ve read as though you have issues with your own identity. Moving half way across the UK won’t necessarily fix that. What will fix it is learning to accept where you come from and accept who you are. You can’t change it, so you are going to have to take ownership of the fact you are indeed Scottish. Only once you’ve achieved that, will a fresh start offer the possible escape you’re seeking.
    I am Scottish by birth - that's all. 18 years is less than a quarter of my likely lifetime. I have been born and raised there, but I won't say that. I will not spend the rest of my life with people thinking I am Scottish. Just no.
    As for my problems, most of them are due to high school and won't matter once I leave there. Going to London would give me a fresh start.

    (Original post by Citizenofpanem)
    With regards losing the accent, you will find if you relocate that your accent will evolve. I used to have quite a posh Home Counties accent growung up, but it has become much less noticeable and decisively more Cornish since I moved here. I even find myself on occasion saying really Cornish phrases that have somehow seaped into my vocabulary. So you will soften your Glaswegian accent, but I think it’s unlikely you would ever truly lose it. And going back to my original point, why should you? Be proud of who you are.
    Of course accents can evolve if you live somewhere else for a long time, but I will also try and pick up the London dialect. Then, I will sound better and feel more confident in myself.
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    (Original post by Joe2001)
    I certainly don't want to go onto cruise ships with my colleagues and customers knowing that I am from Glasgow. I also don't want people from university to know either. I just don't want people to know that I come from a city like Glasgow.
    So what are you going to do when asked casually about where you are from? Lie? Yer talkin pish.

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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    So what are you going to do when asked casually about where you are from? Lie? Yer talkin pish.

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    I would say that I was born in Scotland and live now in England. I would just refer myself as "British". I would also probably make some jokes about Glasgow.
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    "I absolutely hate the accent, and knowing that there are prejudices is another reason to get rid of it. I see no reason to keep it, and I certainly don't want to go onto cruise ships with my colleagues and customers knowing that I am from Glasgow. I also don't want people from university to know either. I just don't want people to know that I come from a city like Glasgow. "

    What do you mean by "city like Glasgow"?
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    (Original post by TrelaiBoy)
    "I absolutely hate the accent, and knowing that there are prejudices is another reason to get rid of it. I see no reason to keep it, and I certainly don't want to go onto cruise ships with my colleagues and customers knowing that I am from Glasgow. I also don't want people from university to know either. I just don't want people to know that I come from a city like Glasgow. "

    What do you mean by "city like Glasgow"?
    A place which is run down, has low life expectancies, and is just generally a bit of a s***hole. I would have no problems if it was somewhere like Edinburgh, although I am not going onto a cruise ship in somewhere like the Med, Australia or Caribbean and say I am from Glasgow. Not a chance.
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    (Original post by Joe2001)
    I feel that it would be a good thing to get rid of it in order to be the person who I want to be and to achieve what I want in life.
    As a gay Glaswegian (although I think of myself more as just Scottish, having lived around the country now) the one nice thing about this post is...

    ...

    I'll get back to you.
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    (Original post by Joe2001)
    A place which is run down, has low life expectancies, and is just generally a bit of a s***hole. I would have no problems if it was somewhere like Edinburgh, although I am not going onto a cruise ship in somewhere like the Med, Australia or Caribbean and say I am from Glasgow. Not a chance.
    Glasgow is similar to every British city, it has run down areas and nicer areas. People won't care that you're from Glasgow
 
 
 
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