B1345 - Pedestrianised Urban Zones Bill Watch

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Unown Uzer
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#21
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#21
(Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
Nay. This really is something that depends a lot on the locale. What is beneficial in Cambridge won't necessarily be in Milton Keynes.
Why do you not think it will be beneficial in Milton Keynes?
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Unown Uzer
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#22
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#22
(Original post by Andrew97)
Thinking Nay. This will just force cars to go into other areas, increasing traffic.
I don't think it will increase traffic as cars don't tend to use narrow streets as throughfares. I actually think that this bill would reduce traffic, as it could discourage people from driving and encourage the use of public transport instead.
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Unown Uzer
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#23
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#23
(Original post by Jacob E)
A bill having no impact because the HGVs in the city centres are making deliveries to shops; these would be exempt under this bill. HGVs do not pass through cities because the traffic, longer journey times, and stop-start driving style increases fuel use and time spent making journeys. To avoid the cities HGVs use ring roads around a city to prevent traffic, for example, the M25 circling London. The proportion of HGVs taken off the roads by this bill will be minimal making the bill a waste, if pedestrianised areas in cities are to be expanded the bill should extend to all cars to make cities big areas where visitors can walk freely in a safe environment. Pedestrianised cities works well in other European cities and in cities in Britain where it has taken place.
I think there are some streets in London where the sidewalks are too narrow for the number of people that use it, and could really do with a pedestrian zone.
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TheDefiniteArticle
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#24
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#24
(Original post by Unown Uzer)
Why do you not think it will be beneficial in Milton Keynes?
Milton Keynes was designed in the 21st century with modern transport methods in mind.
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Unown Uzer
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#25
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#25
(Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
Milton Keynes was designed in the 21st century with modern transport methods in mind.
Exactly, if it was designed with modern transport methods in mind, then public transportation should be the main mode of transport, so streets should be made better for pedestrians instead of cars.
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TheDefiniteArticle
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#26
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#26
(Original post by Unown Uzer)
Exactly, if it was designed with modern transport methods in mind, then public transportation should be the main mode of transport, so streets should be made better for pedestrians instead of cars.
Relative to streets designed in the 13th-16th centuries?
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Unown Uzer
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#27
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#27
(Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
Relative to streets designed in the 13th-16th centuries?
It shouldn't matter when the streets are designed.
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04MR17
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#28
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#28
I think the local authority presiding over Manchester North deserve a say as to whether or not they want a pilot scheme happening there.
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Jammy Duel
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#29
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#29
(Original post by Unown Uzer)
It shouldn't matter when the streets are designed.
Why not? We can go to the two extremes here and look at a narrow road barely wide enough for a car, these for the most part are either pedestrianised already, have very low levels of pedestrian traffic, or very low road traffic. Here it might be reasonable to put heavy traffic restrictions in, and will tend to be your old streets somewhere like Cambridge, York, or parts of London.

At the other extreme we have street that may have several lanes each way for traffic and a wide footpath such that there is ample room for both road and foot traffic, somewhere like Milton Keynes. Further in the case of Milton Keynes you'll find that the city centre shopping is not on a street but in a large shopping centres with dedicated parking and as such pedestrianising the area would be of no tangible benefit which is to be expected given the design specifically had the car in mind with most of the city being serviced by dual carriageways until you get into the housing estates. In fact in the case of Milton Keynes pedestrianising it would be detrimental because it makes access less convenient and as such would more than likely drive people away.
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Andrew97
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#30
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#30
(Original post by Unown Uzer)
I don't think it will increase traffic as cars don't tend to use narrow streets as throughfares. I actually think that this bill would reduce traffic, as it could discourage people from driving and encourage the use of public transport instead.
I politely disagree. People who drive in major cities do so because they need to, not because they want to. Pedestrianising roads will not remove this need.
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DayneD89
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#31
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#31
This has gone to cessation
Posted by SpeakerBot.
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DayneD89
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#32
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#32
This has been withdrawn.
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