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    In my book it says:

    "Fermentation needs sugars from plants and the following conditions:
    • water
    • enzymes from yeast
    • a temperature between 25 °C and 40 °C
    • an absence of oxygen. "


    Water is H2O, which contains oxygen, so how can there be an absence of oxygen if there is water which contains oxygen?

    Thanks!
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    Water is not broken down in the fermentation process into its atoms so oxygen isn’t generated.
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    (Original post by NMauger96)
    Water is not broken down in the fermentation process into its atoms so oxygen isn’t generated.
    Ok thanks!
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    What level are you studying at? For a GCSE level the glucose is used to generate alcohol instead of being used for respiration normally (hence the absence of oxygen) which still yields a small amount of energy for them to survive.
    If you’re at A level: the glucose is broken down into pyruvate (one of the molecules in the respiration pathway) then carbon dioxide is released turning it into acetaldehyde (aldehydes are one step before alcohols) before forming ethanol. Yeast cells do this under conditions of stress (when they have no oxygen) to survive and produce a small amount of ATP (two molecules compared to around 36 they would normally). However the fermentation process relies on increasing the anoxic conditions causing the yeast cells to die leaving alcohol for us 😊
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    (Original post by NMauger96)
    What level are you studying at? For a GCSE level the glucose is used to generate alcohol instead of being used for respiration normally (hence the absence of oxygen) which still yields a small amount of energy for them to survive.
    If you’re at A level: the glucose is broken down into pyruvate (one of the molecules in the respiration pathway) then carbon dioxide is released turning it into acetaldehyde (aldehydes are one step before alcohols) before forming ethanol. Yeast cells do this under conditions of stress (when they have no oxygen) to survive and produce a small amount of ATP (two molecules compared to around 36 they would normally). However the fermentation process relies on increasing the anoxic conditions causing the yeast cells to die leaving alcohol for us 😊
    I'm GCSE. Thanks!
    And Jesus, A-Level looks hella complicated!!!
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    (Original post by TheEyeOfBaradDur)
    I'm GCSE. Thanks!
    And Jesus, A-Level looks hella complicated!!!
    Haha! A level biology is a huge step up from GCSE and then a degree in it is another ridiculously large step up!!

    Best of luck with your GCSEs
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    (Original post by NMauger96)
    Haha! A level biology is a huge step up from GCSE and then a degree in it is another ridiculously large step up!!

    Best of luck with your GCSEs
    Thanks
 
 
 

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