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Regret doing medicine watch

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    I'm a medical student in a London university with regrets over choosing this degree. I failed my 2nd year last year (2016-17) and hence was asked to withdraw. I have appealed and been accepted back into the course but have to take this year out before repeating my 2nd year, so effectively I will be in university for 8 years (instead of 6 years). I will be 26 when I graduate from medical school and many of my peers from school who graduated at 21 would have worked for 5 years and earned during those years. Adding to this the extra year of student finance I would have to pay back

    I have no passion for this course as I don't find it intellectually stimulating and fully mass memorization which puts me in a really bad mood. After graduating medical school I realise that as a junior doctor I will be earning a very low wage. I was a bright student in school who enjoyed the sciences and am regretting going into this field so much now (I was pushed by my dad). I won't ever be as wealthy as my parents and I feel that I have completely lost the plot in life.

    I fully regret this decisions and don't know what to do anymore!!! :-(
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    ...I have no passion for this course as I don't find it intellectually stimulating and fully mass memorization which puts me in a really bad mood.
    Have you spoken to student support? (I would assume so) But could the poor grades result because of the bad moon?

    After graduating medical school I realise that as a junior doctor I will be earning a very low wage.
    Immediately yes, but then it catches up fairly quickly. Graduating at 26yo is not the end of the world at all. You could still be a GP at 31 years old, or consultant at 35 (starting salary £76k).

    I was a bright student in school who enjoyed the sciences and am regretting going into this field so much now (I was pushed by my dad). I won't ever be as wealthy as my parents and I feel that I have completely lost the plot in life.

    I fully regret this decisions and don't know what to do anymore!!! :-(
    I would continue the course, but then I would be biased!
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I'm a medical student in a London university with regrets over choosing this degree. I failed my 2nd year last year (2016-17) and hence was asked to withdraw. I have appealed and been accepted back into the course but have to take this year out before repeating my 2nd year, so effectively I will be in university for 8 years (instead of 6 years). I will be 26 when I graduate from medical school and many of my peers from school who graduated at 21 would have worked for 5 years and earned during those years. Adding to this the extra year of student finance I would have to pay back

    I have no passion for this course as I don't find it intellectually stimulating and fully mass memorization which puts me in a really bad mood. After graduating medical school I realise that as a junior doctor I will be earning a very low wage. I was a bright student in school who enjoyed the sciences and am regretting going into this field so much now (I was pushed by my dad). I won't ever be as wealthy as my parents and I feel that I have completely lost the plot in life.

    I fully regret this decisions and don't know what to do anymore!!! :-(
    Thanks for sharing. Have you approached welfare services at your Uni for advice? Even if you get re-buffed (unlikely) keep going back. They will have dealt with situations just like yours. You are not alone.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I'm a medical student in a London university with regrets over choosing this degree. I failed my 2nd year last year (2016-17) and hence was asked to withdraw. I have appealed and been accepted back into the course but have to take this year out before repeating my 2nd year, so effectively I will be in university for 8 years (instead of 6 years). I will be 26 when I graduate from medical school and many of my peers from school who graduated at 21 would have worked for 5 years and earned during those years. Adding to this the extra year of student finance I would have to pay back

    I have no passion for this course as I don't find it intellectually stimulating and fully mass memorization which puts me in a really bad mood. After graduating medical school I realise that as a junior doctor I will be earning a very low wage. I was a bright student in school who enjoyed the sciences and am regretting going into this field so much now (I was pushed by my dad). I won't ever be as wealthy as my parents and I feel that I have completely lost the plot in life.

    I fully regret this decisions and don't know what to do anymore!!! :-(
    It depends whether you see the road ahead (ie the next 5 years) to be positive and prosperous for you in the late future. Do you think you could build up a relationship with the course and learn to enjoy it? Will the eventual end salary be worth the next 5 or so years for you? Do you see yourself enjoying the job (such as through placements, etc) in the end because that what it will eventually come down to.
    If the answers to these are absolutely no then the likelihood is you’re not going to be passionate about doing well in it and likely not make the grades.
    Look at other possible options and determine whether it will all be worth it - if you want a well paid job that shows off your intellect then you’re on the right path doing medicine - it just takes a while to get there.
    If you want to pursue another degree then you’ll have to make up for lost time and possible take a year out to decide.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I'm a medical student in a London university with regrets over choosing this degree. I failed my 2nd year last year (2016-17) and hence was asked to withdraw. I have appealed and been accepted back into the course but have to take this year out before repeating my 2nd year, so effectively I will be in university for 8 years (instead of 6 years). I will be 26 when I graduate from medical school and many of my peers from school who graduated at 21 would have worked for 5 years and earned during those years. Adding to this the extra year of student finance I would have to pay back

    I have no passion for this course as I don't find it intellectually stimulating and fully mass memorization which puts me in a really bad mood. After graduating medical school I realise that as a junior doctor I will be earning a very low wage. I was a bright student in school who enjoyed the sciences and am regretting going into this field so much now (I was pushed by my dad). I won't ever be as wealthy as my parents and I feel that I have completely lost the plot in life.

    I fully regret this decisions and don't know what to do anymore!!! :-(
    Hey darling.
    I can see where you're coming from. Being in a course that takes at least 6 years to complete and leads to a career that you're not interested in can be very daunting. I can tell you're not at all passionate about medicine... I am just applying for Medicine now as a second degree and I'm nearly 30. It doesn't bother me at what age I would become a consultant, my aim is to be a doctor and be good at what I do. I would have loved it if Medicine was a bit better paid for junior doctors but it is what it is and if you're money driven, it certainly isn't the career for you. If I was you I'll withdraw asap and find the way out of this and take my time to decide what I would really be happy doing. It's not too late yet, and although it may be disappointing for your family, at the end of the day it is the career you'll have to live with for the rest of your life and it is not their choice to make, it's yours.
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    If you’re in London, are you at one of the intercalating universities? If so, why not stick it out until 3rd year and get a BSc in something then drop out and do a masters or whatever using that degree?
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    (Original post by JennLousie)
    If you’re in London, are you at one of the intercalating universities? If so, why not stick it out until 3rd year and get a BSc in something then drop out and do a masters or whatever using that degree?
    This. And even if you are not at an intercalating uni, some unis will give you a degree even if you choose to leave after 3rd year (I don't know the practicalities of it, but in my uni you could theoretically get a BSc if you passed year 3 and chose to quit). Or you might find that you start to enjoy medicine once you get to the clinical years where there is a larger problem solving component and more patient contact.

    Also, a junior doctor's salary is really not so bad! I was able to live pretty comfortably as an F1, renting a flat on my own (not in London or an expensive area, admittedly) and going on holiday every leave. You also have the security of knowing you will have a job when you graduate (without the added stress of having to attend multiple interviews etc).
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    This. And even if you are not at an intercalating uni, some unis will give you a degree even if you choose to leave after 3rd year (I don't know the practicalities of it, but in my uni you could theoretically get a BSc if you passed year 3 and chose to quit). Or you might find that you start to enjoy medicine once you get to the clinical years where there is a larger problem solving component and more patient contact.

    Also, a junior doctor's salary is really not so bad! I was able to live pretty comfortably as an F1, renting a flat on my own (not in London or an expensive area, admittedly) and going on holiday every leave. You also have the security of knowing you will have a job when you graduate (without the added stress of having to attend multiple interviews etc).
    Most intercalation degrees are research-based too, so it'll give you an idea of whether that sector is for you instead of medicine
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    This. And even if you are not at an intercalating uni, some unis will give you a degree even if you choose to leave after 3rd year (I don't know the practicalities of it, but in my uni you could theoretically get a BSc if you passed year 3 and chose to quit). Or you might find that you start to enjoy medicine once you get to the clinical years where there is a larger problem solving component and more patient contact.

    Also, a junior doctor's salary is really not so bad! I was able to live pretty comfortably as an F1, renting a flat on my own (not in London or an expensive area, admittedly) and going on holiday every leave. You also have the security of knowing you will have a job when you graduate (without the added stress of having to attend multiple interviews etc).
    Can I be nosey and ask what your salary was like as an F1? :P
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    (Original post by Elliwhi)
    Can I be nosey and ask what your salary was like as an F1? :P
    Around £1,900 a month after tax.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    ...so effectively I will be in university for 8 years (instead of 6 years).
    So you will be intercalating. Definitely try to get to at least that point so that you get something out of this.

    Dropping out now is an alternative i guess, but you have missed the UCAS deadline so options will be very limited this year. Being a 'dropout' might also limit (although i don't have much experience of this).

    I will be 26 when I graduate from medical school and many of my peers from school who graduated at 21 would have worked for 5 years and earned during those years.
    They've had to work for 5 years too. And work = much longer hours than uni. Not sure why some people are so keen to enter the world of work!

    After graduating medical school I realise that as a junior doctor I will be earning a very low wage.
    Bit of an exaggeration! In your first year after graduation you will be earning significantly more than that national average wage. If you keep your uni lifestyle and rate of expense going you'll be looking at >£10K
    surplus income in the first year, as long as you're not in London. And the wage goes up fast after that.

    I was a bright student in school who enjoyed the sciences and am regretting going into this field so much now (I was pushed by my dad). I won't ever be as wealthy as my parents and I feel that I have completely lost the plot in life.
    Wait - you think scientific research is where the money is?! Lol.

    There are many careers with higher pay than a doctor, but trust me: academia is not one of them!
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    So you will be intercalating. Definitely try to get to at least that point so that you get something out of this.

    Dropping out now is an alternative i guess, but you have missed the UCAS deadline so options will be very limited this year. Being a 'dropout' might also limit (although i don't have much experience of this).



    They've had to work for 5 years too. And work = much longer hours than uni. Not sure why some people are so keen to enter the world of work!



    Bit of an exaggeration! In your first year after graduation you will be earning significantly more than that national average wage. If you keep your uni lifestyle and rate of expense going you'll be looking at >£10K
    surplus income in the first year, as long as you're not in London. And the wage goes up fast after that.



    Wait - you think scientific research is where the money is?! Lol.

    There are many careers with higher pay than a doctor, but trust me: academia is not one of them!
    Not if you're a vice-chancellor
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    Have you spoken to student support? (I would assume so) But could the poor grades result because of the bad moon?



    Immediately yes, but then it catches up fairly quickly. Graduating at 26yo is not the end of the world at all. You could still be a GP at 31 years old, or consultant at 35 (starting salary £76k).



    I would continue the course, but then I would be biased!
    I have spoken to student support and have had CBT as well as I had depression throughout last year.
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    (Original post by Lily048)
    It depends whether you see the road ahead (ie the next 5 years) to be positive and prosperous for you in the late future. Do you think you could build up a relationship with the course and learn to enjoy it? Will the eventual end salary be worth the next 5 or so years for you? Do you see yourself enjoying the job (such as through placements, etc) in the end because that what it will eventually come down to.
    If the answers to these are absolutely no then the likelihood is you’re not going to be passionate about doing well in it and likely not make the grades.
    Look at other possible options and determine whether it will all be worth it - if you want a well paid job that shows off your intellect then you’re on the right path doing medicine - it just takes a while to get there.
    If you want to pursue another degree then you’ll have to make up for lost time and possible take a year out to decide.
    I haven't reached clinical years. Not necessarily showing off intellect but I am aware of more options now and hence have feelings of regret looking back on the decision I made when I was 17.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I haven't reached clinical years. Not necessarily showing off intellect but I am aware of more options now and hence have feelings of regret looking back on the decision I made when I was 17.
    Well it’s whether you truly see reaching those years in clinician practice to be worth it - long hours, hard to deal with people but arguably very rewarding!
    Don’t try and please a 17 year old dream if it doesn’t please your current __ year old you now
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    So you will be intercalating. Definitely try to get to at least that point so that you get something out of this.

    Dropping out now is an alternative i guess, but you have missed the UCAS deadline so options will be very limited this year. Being a 'dropout' might also limit (although i don't have much experience of this).



    They've had to work for 5 years too. And work = much longer hours than uni. Not sure why some people are so keen to enter the world of work!



    Bit of an exaggeration! In your first year after graduation you will be earning significantly more than that national average wage. If you keep your uni lifestyle and rate of expense going you'll be looking at >£10K
    surplus income in the first year, as long as you're not in London. And the wage goes up fast after that.



    Wait - you think scientific research is where the money is?! Lol.

    There are many careers with higher pay than a doctor, but trust me: academia is not one of them!
    Work = more money, so you can save up for a deposit and buy a house etc., effectively I have lost 5 years of income

    I only said science because I was good at those subjects in school but now I am aware of more career opportunities that I can see myself doing that I wasn't aware of in my school days.
    And as you have said being a dropout is not going to help me switch courses, and its unlikely I would get into a good university now that I have failed.

    Just out of interest how old were you when you qualified?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I'm a medical student in a London university with regrets over choosing this degree. I failed my 2nd year last year (2016-17) and hence was asked to withdraw. I have appealed and been accepted back into the course but have to take this year out before repeating my 2nd year, so effectively I will be in university for 8 years (instead of 6 years). I will be 26 when I graduate from medical school and many of my peers from school who graduated at 21 would have worked for 5 years and earned during those years. Adding to this the extra year of student finance I would have to pay back

    I have no passion for this course as I don't find it intellectually stimulating and fully mass memorization which puts me in a really bad mood. After graduating medical school I realise that as a junior doctor I will be earning a very low wage. I was a bright student in school who enjoyed the sciences and am regretting going into this field so much now (I was pushed by my dad). I won't ever be as wealthy as my parents and I feel that I have completely lost the plot in life.

    I fully regret this decisions and don't know what to do anymore!!! :-(
    Wanna trade places with me? CS for your medical seat.

    Just joking.

    I'll probably be 26 when I start medical school (If I don't get in via GEM). The salary is bad in the beginning but once you get through the struggles of being a doctor in training you can command a nice salary of £60,000+ (when you're in your mid 30s early 40s) depending on which speciality you choose. I'm sure you know this a medical student but just think about the future.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I will be 26 when I graduate from medical school and many of my peers from school who graduated at 21 would have worked for 5 years and earned during those years. (
    I will start my foundation training aged 26 and I honestly can't see what is wrong with that?
    Medicine is a long course and all sorts of things can happen to delay graduation ranging from failing exams to taking time out for personal reasons etc... it's really not uncommon to graduate from medical school aged 25+.

    And yes many people graduate when they're 21 but everyone's in their own lane and comparison is the thief of joy-you should focus on what is best for you so make sure you really want to drop out before making a rushed decision that you might regret.

    I know medicine is not all roses and butterflies but having a medicine degree will open up a number of doors and if you don't like clinical medicine you could still work in: research, public health, non-profit/charity organisations, healthcare consulting (PwC, McKinsey and other big companies actively recruit medics), med tech etc..

    You probably don't have a clear idea of what you want to do long term yet as you're still relatively young so having a medical degree might actually keep more options open for you than you might think!
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    (Original post by panda1093)

    I know medicine is not all roses and butterflies but having a medicine degree will open up a number of doors and if you don't like clinical medicine you could still work in: research, public health, non-profit/charity organisations, healthcare consulting (PwC, McKinsey and other big companies actively recruit medics), med tech etc..
    Also there's the military and academic medicine.
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    I felt exactly the same as you in 2nd year and still do. My intention is to just crack on and investigate careers outside of medicine. Have a look at management consultancy, quite a few medics go into it. It’s challenging and more financially rewarding. Wait until you finish though, or at least wait until your Bsc in 4th year
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