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    Hi, not sure if this is the perfect place to ask (or whether I should have posted on the Computer Science Or Maths Sub-Forum ) but anyway, I wanted to see if I could find a good course to fit me so maybe this is as good of place as any.

    So a bit of background: I'm currently in Yr 12 studying Maths, Further Maths, Physics and Computer Science and have been thinking about what I'd like to do do at Uni as well as where I'd like to go. I've always thought, in secondary school, that I'd study straight computer science at Uni, but right now, studying A Levels, has made me realise how much I love maths as well.

    It kinda makes things a bit trickier as I've since realised I actually like Computer Science and Maths equally. There are parts of each subject that make it enticing for me to study - for example I enjoy greatly the pure aspects of maths but also adore the practical side of computer science (the programming). Which is why I'm now thinking of doing a joint degree in Computer Science and Maths. I've been doing reasonably well so far so I think an Oxbridge application is a possibility if I get good grades in my end of year exams ( Just visited Cambridge so leaning there; the idea of STEP does scare the crap out of me, though :/ ).

    However, what I really want is a versatile course. One that would offer a whole wide range of maths/computer science modules for me to pick and choose the path I want to take. Does anyone recommend a good course? Maybe from first or second hand experience? I've looked at a couple I've find interesting such as UCL's Mathematical Computation (its a 4 year course, would prefer it to be 3) and Imperial's Joint Maths Computing. Any other ones to look out for?

    I think the versatility of the course is a much more important factor than the outward prestige of the Uni. So would welcome any suggestions that are Uni's not often considered to be right at the top of the rankings.

    If it makes any differences I do plan on entering the tech industry after I graduate so studying Maths, is just going to be for my own enjoyment. (Realise that sounds really nerdy but I guess most of us are probably nerds here anyway )
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    (Original post by ThatNerd)
    Hi, not sure if this is the perfect place to ask (or whether I should have posted on the Computer Science Or Maths Sub-Forum ) but anyway, I wanted to see if I could find a good course to fit me so maybe this is as good of place as any.

    So a bit of background: I'm currently in Yr 12 studying Maths, Further Maths, Physics and Computer Science and have been thinking about what I'd like to do do at Uni as well as where I'd like to go. I've always thought, in secondary school, that I'd study straight computer science at Uni, but right now, studying A Levels, has made me realise how much I love maths as well.

    It kinda makes things a bit trickier as I've since realised I actually like Computer Science and Maths equally. There are parts of each subject that make it enticing for me to study - for example I enjoy greatly the pure aspects of maths but also adore the practical side of computer science (the programming). Which is why I'm now thinking of doing a joint degree in Computer Science and Maths. I've been doing reasonably well so far so I think an Oxbridge application is a possibility if I get good grades in my end of year exams ( Just visited Cambridge so leaning there; the idea of STEP does scare the crap out of me, though :/ ).

    However, what I really want is a versatile course. One that would offer a whole wide range of maths/computer science modules for me to pick and choose the path I want to take. Does anyone recommend a good course? Maybe from first or second hand experience? I've looked at a couple I've find interesting such as UCL's Mathematical Computation (its a 4 year course, would prefer it to be 3) and Imperial's Joint Maths Computing. Any other ones to look out for?

    I think the versatility of the course is a much more important factor than the outward prestige of the Uni. So would welcome any suggestions that are Uni's not often considered to be right at the top of the rankings.

    If it makes any differences I do plan on entering the tech industry after I graduate so studying Maths, is just going to be for my own enjoyment. (Realise that sounds really nerdy but I guess most of us are probably nerds here anyway )
    Have a look at Edinburgh. Their infomatics dept is excellent and the extra year that you get in Scottish degrees gives you the time and flexibility to really get the most out of a joint honours course.
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    (Original post by ThatNerd)
    Hi, not sure if this is the perfect place to ask (or whether I should have posted on the Computer Science Or Maths Sub-Forum ) but anyway, I wanted to see if I could find a good course to fit me so maybe this is as good of place as any.

    So a bit of background: I'm currently in Yr 12 studying Maths, Further Maths, Physics and Computer Science and have been thinking about what I'd like to do do at Uni as well as where I'd like to go. I've always thought, in secondary school, that I'd study straight computer science at Uni, but right now, studying A Levels, has made me realise how much I love maths as well.

    It kinda makes things a bit trickier as I've since realised I actually like Computer Science and Maths equally. There are parts of each subject that make it enticing for me to study - for example I enjoy greatly the pure aspects of maths but also adore the practical side of computer science (the programming). Which is why I'm now thinking of doing a joint degree in Computer Science and Maths. I've been doing reasonably well so far so I think an Oxbridge application is a possibility if I get good grades in my end of year exams ( Just visited Cambridge so leaning there; the idea of STEP does scare the crap out of me, though :/ ).

    However, what I really want is a versatile course. One that would offer a whole wide range of maths/computer science modules for me to pick and choose the path I want to take. Does anyone recommend a good course? Maybe from first or second hand experience? I've looked at a couple I've find interesting such as UCL's Mathematical Computation (its a 4 year course, would prefer it to be 3) and Imperial's Joint Maths Computing. Any other ones to look out for?

    I think the versatility of the course is a much more important factor than the outward prestige of the Uni. So would welcome any suggestions that are Uni's not often considered to be right at the top of the rankings.

    If it makes any differences I do plan on entering the tech industry after I graduate so studying Maths, is just going to be for my own enjoyment. (Realise that sounds really nerdy but I guess most of us are probably nerds here anyway )
    Warwick's Discrete Maths course is generally considered to be good, so might be worth looking into.

    However on the subject of Cambridge Comp Sci, the 'with Maths' option only differs in the first year (as is the case with quite a few of the 'with Maths' options at different unis), and the straight Comp Sci course is maths heavy anyway (compared to CS courses at other unis). On top of this, apparently quite a few first years choose to take extra maths modules. So you may still want to consider it.

    I'd take this point further and say that you may not nessecarily want to rule out the straight CS courses everywhere, but look at the modules offered, as some may have a high enough maths content that you feel you'd be happy with it
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    Thanks for the help, both of you. I'll be sure to check out Warwick's and Edinburgh's course.
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    Pretty much all of the above are the major ones;

    I'd suggest considering Glasgow if you're looking at Scotland, who have a very long history of excellence in computing and Informatics (and their Informatics department is very well regarded). Aberdeen also has similar benefits and is generally quite well regarded although I don't know much about their CS/Maths departments. Heriot-Watt and Strathclyde both have a good deal of expertise in STEM subjects, although their focuses tend to be a bit more industry driven rather than theoretical research oriented, at least at the undergraduate - on the CS side this may be more fitting to your interests, but they may or may not have the pure maths options you want to follow (I honestly don't know I haven't looked at their maths courses). Edinburgh as above has the benefits of the Scottish format and is very good in general.

    You may want to consider Durham Natural Sciences, which allows you to combine the two (potentially with another subject or subjects) and has a great array of mathematical options from pure maths, to applied maths and theoretical physics. They also have theoretically oriented CS options and more software development/engineering oriented options (i.e. programming). This may also be a good choice if you might want to continue with physics in some capacity, or pick up a new subject for example philosophy (as they have several logic options that are of immediate relevance, and some metaphysics ones that are less obviously but very much relevant to the more theoretical aspects of CS) or geography/earth sciences (may have some GIS type things of interest) etc.

    Spoiler:
    Show

    This is pretty much just revisiting stuff mentioned above and/or is probably already known to you to some extent, so I've thrown it under here to reduce clutter

    Oxford and Cambridge both have variations of the course, with Cambridge only having Maths formally as part of the first year (making up half of the first year) however it may be possible to change into the Maths tripos with the agreement of the DoS at the college (however as I understand the creation of the CS with Maths option was made so as to avoid this) and Oxford having more flexibility in how much you focus on the Maths or CS as you go through the course. It may be worth noting on the Maths tripos there are options in theoretical CS topics and logic/set theory and related areas, and you'll almost inevitably build at least a basic background in programming on that course (and you could well develop that more less formally).

    Warwick's Discrete Maths course is very much a joint honours between the two, although the name may not suggest it immediately. There are a large number of CS options available, and it is formally based in the CS department there. The core structure of the course focuses on core relevant aspects of theoretical CS and pure mathematics, with scope to explore different areas mof these or more applied areas in either field through the option choices. The Mathematical Computation course at UCL is somewhat similar, although the CS side seems slightly more leaning towards the development/applications side of things after the core courses in the first two years, which may be more of interest to you.

    More generally, as indicated above most CS courses among the "top" universities will be necessarily mathematical to a point anyway, which will likely include at least some introduction to proof based mathematics as well as the usual more computational elements. If you particularly enjoy doing maths in the process of solving problems you could consider some computer/electronic/information engineering courses, which while probably having less opportunity to explore the very pure maths topics and some of the more abstract theoretical cs areas immediately, will weave aspects of computer science and mathematics with physics pretty fluidly throughout the course.

    I would however note what is considered "pure" maths in A-level is generally considered applied/computational (i.e. problem solving) maths in degree level Maths. The proof based content of Further Maths is more indicative of pure maths at university, often applied to matrix concepts (linear algebra) and complex numbers (complex analysis) - also things like differentiation from first principles (which is the elements of analysis). But if the pure maths you're particularly enjoying now is stuff like solving calculus problems, differential equations, computing matrix/vector problems and so on, this would be very much in evidence in any computer engineering type course, and to a large extent in single honours CS courses - pursuing a joint honours course with Maths wouldn't be necessary to have this as part of your degree. These courses, particularly the former, also may have more scope for software development/engineering type work (i.e. programming) whereas a joint honours CS and Maths course may be inclined to cover the more theoretical topics in CS as a matter of priority and relegate the more practical elements to optional modules.

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    (Original post by PQ)
    Have a look at Edinburgh. Their infomatics dept is excellent and the extra year that you get in Scottish degrees gives you the time and flexibility to really get the most out of a joint honours course.
    Yeah - and at Edinburgh Uni some of the Comp Sci modules in the 1st 2 years are maths courses and are common with the Mathematics students.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Pretty much all of the above are the major ones;

    I'd suggest considering Glasgow if you're looking at Scotland, who have a very long history of excellence in computing and Informatics (and their Informatics department is very well regarded). Aberdeen also has similar benefits and is generally quite well regarded although I don't know much about their CS/Maths departments. Heriot-Watt and Strathclyde both have a good deal of expertise in STEM subjects, although their focuses tend to be a bit more industry driven rather than theoretical research oriented, at least at the undergraduate - on the CS side this may be more fitting to your interests, but they may or may not have the pure maths options you want to follow (I honestly don't know I haven't looked at their maths courses). Edinburgh as above has the benefits of the Scottish format and is very good in general.

    You may want to consider Durham Natural Sciences, which allows you to combine the two (potentially with another subject or subjects) and has a great array of mathematical options from pure maths, to applied maths and theoretical physics. They also have theoretically oriented CS options and more software development/engineering oriented options (i.e. programming). This may also be a good choice if you might want to continue with physics in some capacity, or pick up a new subject for example philosophy (as they have several logic options that are of immediate relevance, and some metaphysics ones that are less obviously but very much relevant to the more theoretical aspects of CS) or geography/earth sciences (may have some GIS type things of interest) etc.

    Spoiler:
    Show


    This is pretty much just revisiting stuff mentioned above and/or is probably already known to you to some extent, so I've thrown it under here to reduce clutter

    Oxford and Cambridge both have variations of the course, with Cambridge only having Maths formally as part of the first year (making up half of the first year) however it may be possible to change into the Maths tripos with the agreement of the DoS at the college (however as I understand the creation of the CS with Maths option was made so as to avoid this) and Oxford having more flexibility in how much you focus on the Maths or CS as you go through the course. It may be worth noting on the Maths tripos there are options in theoretical CS topics and logic/set theory and related areas, and you'll almost inevitably build at least a basic background in programming on that course (and you could well develop that more less formally).

    Warwick's Discrete Maths course is very much a joint honours between the two, although the name may not suggest it immediately. There are a large number of CS options available, and it is formally based in the CS department there. The core structure of the course focuses on core relevant aspects of theoretical CS and pure mathematics, with scope to explore different areas mof these or more applied areas in either field through the option choices. The Mathematical Computation course at UCL is somewhat similar, although the CS side seems slightly more leaning towards the development/applications side of things after the core courses in the first two years, which may be more of interest to you.

    More generally, as indicated above most CS courses among the "top" universities will be necessarily mathematical to a point anyway, which will likely include at least some introduction to proof based mathematics as well as the usual more computational elements. If you particularly enjoy doing maths in the process of solving problems you could consider some computer/electronic/information engineering courses, which while probably having less opportunity to explore the very pure maths topics and some of the more abstract theoretical cs areas immediately, will weave aspects of computer science and mathematics with physics pretty fluidly throughout the course.

    I would however note what is considered "pure" maths in A-level is generally considered applied/computational (i.e. problem solving) maths in degree level Maths. The proof based content of Further Maths is more indicative of pure maths at university, often applied to matrix concepts (linear algebra) and complex numbers (complex analysis) - also things like differentiation from first principles (which is the elements of analysis). But if the pure maths you're particularly enjoying now is stuff like solving calculus problems, differential equations, computing matrix/vector problems and so on, this would be very much in evidence in any computer engineering type course, and to a large extent in single honours CS courses - pursuing a joint honours course with Maths wouldn't be necessary to have this as part of your degree. These courses, particularly the former, also may have more scope for software development/engineering type work (i.e. programming) whereas a joint honours CS and Maths course may be inclined to cover the more theoretical topics in CS as a matter of priority and relegate the more practical elements to optional modules.


    Wow thanks for such a detailed reply. You're spot on about the pure maths part. I am particularly enjoying the calculus and vector maths that I'm currently doing. I wasn't aware that things like these would be covered in straight CS courses. (Would've thought the only maths covered would be akin to the decision maths done at A Level but in more detail.) This is really helpful info. Well pretty much everything you've said is .

    I've just looked at Durham's Natural Science course and it looks like something I would actually really like. The opportunity to explore a range of things while still being able to specialise. I do have a question though: if I do get a degree from Durham do I get a bachelor's in Natural Sciences or would I get it in whatever I specialised in so Computer Science & Maths?

    From what you've said it also seems like Oxford's course would be more suitable for me if I went for the Joint degree though seeing as the maths that I'm most interested in is probably going to be covered in single honours I'm a bit less inclined now to go that route.

    UCL's Mathematical Computation also seems like a good fit having a nice balanced feel to it - incorporating more on the development side is a plus over Warwick's still equally interesting Discrete Maths course. Edinburgh's informatics has it own USP to me as it seems to give a much wider range of choice in what modules I can take compared to UCL or Warwick.

    Wow its kinda daunting having all of these amazing courses to choose from. A bit glad that I've still got a while while until I need to make my choices . Thanks again for all the great info. Super helpful.
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    (Original post by ThatNerd)
    Wow thanks for such a detailed reply. You're spot on about the pure maths part. I am particularly enjoying the calculus and vector maths that I'm currently doing. I wasn't aware that things like these would be covered in straight CS courses. (Would've thought the only maths covered would be akin to the decision maths done at A Level but in more detail.) This is really helpful info. Well pretty much everything you've said is .

    I've just looked at Durham's Natural Science course and it looks like something I would actually really like. The opportunity to explore a range of things while still being able to specialise. I do have a question though: if I do get a degree from Durham do I get a bachelor's in Natural Sciences or would I get it in whatever I specialised in so Computer Science & Maths?

    From what you've said it also seems like Oxford's course would be more suitable for me if I went for the Joint degree though seeing as the maths that I'm most interested in is probably going to be covered in single honours I'm a bit less inclined now to go that route.

    UCL's Mathematical Computation also seems like a good fit having a nice balanced feel to it - incorporating more on the development side is a plus over Warwick's still equally interesting Discrete Maths course. Edinburgh's informatics has it own USP to me as it seems to give a much wider range of choice in what modules I can take compared to UCL or Warwick.

    Wow its kinda daunting having all of these amazing courses to choose from. A bit glad that I've still got a while while until I need to make my choices . Thanks again for all the great info. Super helpful.
    On the Durham subject, I believe it depends on what combination(s) you take - there are certain named pathways between two subjects I believe, and more varied combinations are usually designated "Natural Sciences" - although in any technical field an employer will probably look at your actual experience and relevant background more than the degree title. However I'm not sure if CS and Maths is one of the combinations so caveat emptor if that's important to you.

    As I understand the CS & Maths joint school at Oxford has primarily pure maths options on the maths side with relatively little theoretical physics and some applied maths more broadly. There was a page I found which had the various options, but it wasn't very obvious and took me a long time to find it...and I'm not sure I could again :s but somewhere on the Ox website is more info on that front.

    Regarding maths in CS, to some extent you'll cover some of that, although the specific content may vary somewhat. Certainly on a Computer/Electronic/Information Engineering course you'll cover most relevant engineering maths. You'll likely cover enough calculus and suchlike to be able to do digital signal processing stuff although this may vary.

    You'll definitely cover linear algebra at least in a computational sense - which is matrices (and vectors - they're both different dimensions of the same mathematical structure). You will do at least some similar things to decision maths, at a higher level. Depending on the course, you are likely to do at least some of these discrete maths and linear algebra topics stuff in a proof based fashion...

    But yes they're very complementary areas and with both CS and Maths becoming more popular degree options and having more interest these days, the unis have worked to make sure you have plenty of interesting courses to select from (although several of these have been around for quite a while, the Mathematical Computation and Discrete Mathematics courses discussed were created within the last 10 years or so)
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    I'm kind of amazed of how knowledgeable you are on this whole subject. I think I'm going to have to visit all of these places in the summer and try and get a good feel of what I would like. I'm actually really looking forward to the idea of studying CS & Maths at uni. A bit curious: did you study Computer Science at university?
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    (Original post by ThatNerd)
    Hi, not sure if this is the perfect place to ask (or whether I should have posted on the Computer Science Or Maths Sub-Forum ) but anyway, I wanted to see if I could find a good course to fit me so maybe this is as good of place as any.

    So a bit of background: I'm currently in Yr 12 studying Maths, Further Maths, Physics and Computer Science and have been thinking about what I'd like to do do at Uni as well as where I'd like to go. I've always thought, in secondary school, that I'd study straight computer science at Uni, but right now, studying A Levels, has made me realise how much I love maths as well.

    It kinda makes things a bit trickier as I've since realised I actually like Computer Science and Maths equally. There are parts of each subject that make it enticing for me to study - for example I enjoy greatly the pure aspects of maths but also adore the practical side of computer science (the programming). Which is why I'm now thinking of doing a joint degree in Computer Science and Maths. I've been doing reasonably well so far so I think an Oxbridge application is a possibility if I get good grades in my end of year exams ( Just visited Cambridge so leaning there; the idea of STEP does scare the crap out of me, though :/ ).

    However, what I really want is a versatile course. One that would offer a whole wide range of maths/computer science modules for me to pick and choose the path I want to take. Does anyone recommend a good course? Maybe from first or second hand experience? I've looked at a couple I've find interesting such as UCL's Mathematical Computation (its a 4 year course, would prefer it to be 3) and Imperial's Joint Maths Computing. Any other ones to look out for?

    I think the versatility of the course is a much more important factor than the outward prestige of the Uni. So would welcome any suggestions that are Uni's not often considered to be right at the top of the rankings.

    If it makes any differences I do plan on entering the tech industry after I graduate so studying Maths, is just going to be for my own enjoyment. (Realise that sounds really nerdy but I guess most of us are probably nerds here anyway )
    Hello

    I'd really recommend considering our BSc Mathematics with Computer Science or BSc Mathematics and Computer Science. The 'with' is 75% Maths, 25% Computer Science and the 'and' is 50% Maths /50% Computer Science. You will be hard pushed to find more flexible courses! Our campus is beautiful, set in parkland just a short bus ride from Edinburgh (have you been?). Heriot-Watt is a really friendly place to study:grouphugs:

    For BSc Computer Science, we ask for A-Levels ABB including Mathematics and Computing for direct entry to Year 2. For BSc Mathematics with/and Computer Science, we ask for A-Levels AAB including Mathematics at A. Click on the links above to explore the modules available to you in each semester and each year. Our BSc in Computer Science contains more maths modules than most CS degrees, so you might be interested in that too.

    Holly (Heriot-Watt University)
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    (Original post by ThatNerd)
    artful_lounger
    I'm kind of amazed of how knowledgeable you are on this whole subject. I think I'm going to have to visit all of these places in the summer and try and get a good feel of what I would like. I'm actually really looking forward to the idea of studying CS & Maths at uni. A bit curious: did you study Computer Science at university?
    No; I (very briefly) studied Maths then switched to Electronic Engineering. EE has a fair amount of overlap with CS though as you can probably appreciate, and I did spent a while investigating CS as a possibility to "hop fields" slightly after graduating (which didn't happen anyway due to health issues ).
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    Exeter's course is pretty neat (doing it atm).

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