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People who got a 2:2...How did you take it/What did you do after uni?? watch

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    (Original post by Mike1211)
    Unless you're from Oxford or Cambridge, it doesn't matter.
    why would it matter if you're at Oxbridge?


    OP, there are plenty of grad schemes accepting students with a 2:2. These include (but are not limited to) the big four accounting firms, finance roles (eg Lloyds), civil service roles, 'in house' accounting or finance roles for large companies, a lot of smaller firms, publishing houses...

    Ultimately if you're looking to boost your application, try to get some experience before you graduate / arrange it for the summer after graduation so that you can put it as a future work placement on your CV. Any 'lower' grades can always be 'dragged up' by some experience, relevant or otherwise.
    Source: will be graduating with a 2:2 this year but have landed my dream job (with great career prospects for progression too, my degree will not hold me back!)
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    (Original post by Lily048)
    I’m studying Criminology Undergraduate Degree with Honours
    You'll be fine. One area you might want to look in to (if you decide to go back to do a masters) is Cyber Security. I say that as there is a lot of money and scholarships going around at the moment due to there being a lack of Cyber Security professionals in the UK. You might need to fill in some gaps in areas you are light through work experience, but it's definitely something that someone with a Criminology background might be interested in (particularly Cyber Security Ethics and Digital Forensics).
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    (Original post by Kmonster)
    why would it matter if you're at Oxbridge?


    OP, there are plenty of grad schemes accepting students with a 2:2. These include (but are not limited to) the big four accounting firms, finance roles (eg Lloyds), civil service roles, 'in house' accounting or finance roles for large companies, a lot of smaller firms, publishing houses...

    Ultimately if you're looking to boost your application, try to get some experience before you graduate / arrange it for the summer after graduation so that you can put it as a future work placement on your CV. Any 'lower' grades can always be 'dragged up' by some experience, relevant or otherwise.
    Source: will be graduating with a 2:2 this year but have landed my dream job (with great career prospects for progression too, my degree will not hold me back!)
    What career have you managed to get? When people say experience I always wonder how exactly they get it, it’s very rare to find companies taking on people during the summer just for the sake of experience, unless they are actively advertising for it, they will just want grads for schemes and young people for apprenticeships by this point.
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    (Original post by Lily048)
    What career have you managed to get? When people say experience I always wonder how exactly they get it, it’s very rare to find companies taking on people during the summer just for the sake of experience, unless they are actively advertising for it, they will just want grads for schemes and young people for apprenticeships by this point.
    I'm going to be a consultant at one of the big 4 accountancy firms in central London, working in a specific area I find particularly interesting.

    In my second year of uni, I found experience relevant to my degree (chemistry) in a lab near uni for 8 weeks. I did this to increase my chances of getting the masters project I wanted, and to boost my CV, despite it being irrelevant in terms of the careers I wanted. I tried to make it relevant by talking about transferable skills in interviews.

    In summer of third year, I worked at one of the Big 4 accountancy firms. I was 'on track' for a 2:2 at this point, despite having a 3rd in my 2nd year exams (illness). They appear to care much more about potential, and how you perform in online tests and interview.

    Side note: Despite my inevitable 2:2, I received offers for every graduate scheme I applied for (including civil service fast stream). I even received an offer from a boutique investment bank who claim they only accept people with a 1st, and I listed a 2:2 very clearly on my CV and also did not check the box saying I was on track for a 2:1 on their application form. At interview, my degree class was discussed and I didn't make 'excuses' - I don't believe my grades define me. I'm explaining this so you realise it's never worth lying on your application form: if you're a strong enough candidate in the other areas then they'll want you anyway.

    FYI, there are a fair few schemes which accept recent graduates for 3 month / 6 month / 1 year placements. You don't always need a 2:1 and they don't always expect you to convert to a full graduate scheme after, although they will often make the offer!

    Also might be worth considering unpaid/volunteer positions, even if only for a one or two week placement. These can really help boost your CV and the companies often pay for travel.
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    (Original post by Kmonster)
    I'm going to be a consultant at one of the big 4 accountancy firms in central London, working in a specific area I find particularly interesting.

    In my second year of uni, I found experience relevant to my degree (chemistry) in a lab near uni for 8 weeks. I did this to increase my chances of getting the masters project I wanted, and to boost my CV, despite it being irrelevant in terms of the careers I wanted. I tried to make it relevant by talking about transferable skills in interviews.

    In summer of third year, I worked at one of the Big 4 accountancy firms. I was 'on track' for a 2:2 at this point, despite having a 3rd in my 2nd year exams (illness). They appear to care much more about potential, and how you perform in online tests and interview.

    Side note: Despite my inevitable 2:2, I received offers for every graduate scheme I applied for (including civil service fast stream). I even received an offer from a boutique investment bank who claim they only accept people with a 1st, and I listed a 2:2 very clearly on my CV and also did not check the box saying I was on track for a 2:1 on their application form. At interview, my degree class was discussed and I didn't make 'excuses' - I don't believe my grades define me. I'm explaining this so you realise it's never worth lying on your application form: if you're a strong enough candidate in the other areas then they'll want you anyway.

    FYI, there are a fair few schemes which accept recent graduates for 3 month / 6 month / 1 year placements. You don't always need a 2:1 and they don't always expect you to convert to a full graduate scheme after, although they will often make the offer!

    Also might be worth considering unpaid/volunteer positions, even if only for a one or two week placement. These can really help boost your CV and the companies often pay for travel.
    How do you recommend going about applying for such experience? I highly doubt my local police force or HR firm are going to take me on just through an email saying I want to gain experience paid/unpaid, I just wonder if there is technique here that is the secret to securing these sort of placements. It helps if you know people but in my case that is not going to help. Like I said just approaching them won't attract them to me anymore than a non graduate would, even if I said I would do it unpaid.
    I would like to work in a firm like you said, my degree though I feel would be too generic for them - with chemistry how did you sway them to pick you over a person who has a relevant first class degree? I get that chemistry is obviously hard and analytical in some sense so they might have favoured that, but did you have any skills before hand to aid you there? I currently dont have ANY work experience in my field so it seems slightly more difficult to sway them in my direction.
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    (Original post by Joel 96)
    Is a 2:2 really that bad? I'm in my first year and I got a 2:2 (56%) for my first unit. Obviously, the expectation is that I'll improve in time, but I was just thinking the other day about the possibility of finishing my course with a 2:2. I'd love to see some other comments because this grading system is really new to me.
    Without trying to belittle those who get a 2:2, I personally would see it as a bad thing if I achieved a 2:2. As someone who spent their school and college life getting As (so 80%+) suddenly dropping to 50%, I'd most definitely feel like a failure. To me personally, even a 2:1 seems like a low grade and I wouldn't ever be happy getting two thirds of the marks. For me it's not about what a 2:2 means but the actual numbers behind university grading. I feel like a 40% to pass is laughable and a 70% for the top grade is almost insulting. If I applied that to real life, it simply wouldn't work. "Oh I won't get fired from my job as long as I do 40% of my job correctly". Or "I only have to do 3 quarters of the work to achieve well in this company". After previous education, University just feels like it sets the bar so exceptionally low that so much of what you do has no meaning.

    I'll reiterate that this is only my personal opinion and I'm not saying anyone who graduates with a 2:2 is a failure.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Without trying to belittle those who get a 2:2, I personally would see it as a bad thing if I achieved a 2:2. As someone who spent their school and college life getting As (so 80%+) suddenly dropping to 50%, I'd most definitely feel like a failure. To me personally, even a 2:1 seems like a low grade and I wouldn't ever be happy getting two thirds of the marks. For me it's not about what a 2:2 means but the actual numbers behind university grading. I feel like a 40% to pass is laughable and a 70% for the top grade is almost insulting. If I applied that to real life, it simply wouldn't work. "Oh I won't get fired from my job as long as I do 40% of my job correctly". Or "I only have to do 3 quarters of the work to achieve well in this company". After previous education, University just feels like it sets the bar so exceptionally low that so much of what you do has no meaning.

    I'll reiterate that this is only my personal opinion and I'm not saying anyone who graduates with a 2:2 is a failure.
    I know its personal to each person but I am aiming for a 2:1 because I know realistically a first is out of my sights. I am not being defeatist, just realistic and logical (i.e the probable percentage grade for each individual assignment vs credit grade weighting = likelihood of 2:1). I would LOVE a first, but university is hard, and believe it or not accentuating circumstances do happen - why am I aiming for a 2:1? Because my mental health severely deteriorated this year and I ended up having to move out of a student house due to bullying to back home, which means I now have to commute 2 hours to university by train. I have had an incredibly difficult year and the worst part is I cannot explain that to future employers because they don't care about that stuff. But in equal measures a 2:2 would scare me. Opening up my results to see that in front of me makes me stomach drop. But no one can say I haven't worked hard because I have, more than some and University does push a lot of people, so to say it sets the bar low is a bit arrogant IMO..
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    (Original post by Lily048)
    How do you recommend going about applying for such experience? I highly doubt my local police force or HR firm are going to take me on just through an email saying I want to gain experience paid/unpaid, I just wonder if there is technique here that is the secret to securing these sort of placements. It helps if you know people but in my case that is not going to help. Like I said just approaching them won't attract them to me anymore than a non graduate would, even if I said I would do it unpaid.
    I would like to work in a firm like you said, my degree though I feel would be too generic for them - with chemistry how did you sway them to pick you over a person who has a relevant first class degree? I get that chemistry is obviously hard and analytical in some sense so they might have favoured that, but did you have any skills before hand to aid you there? I currently dont have ANY work experience in my field so it seems slightly more difficult to sway them in my direction.
    If you're looking at police work, see the relevant police force website. For example, Thames Valley police:
    "Our volunteers come from a variety of backgrounds and cultures and are aged 16 and above. 16 to 18 year olds will need the permission of a parent or guardian. We will pay your out-of-pocket expenses and there are no minimum amount of hours you have to complete."

    So you would just need to apply online. However, the Police Now grad scheme does require a 2:1. If you were to apply for a job as a police constable with the Met (for example) you would only need a grade C in GCSE English, no degree necessary.

    Unfortunately I was in a similar position to you, where I didn't have any contacts in any of the industries I was interested in, so I just googled everything to do with any kind of firm I might fancy. Also went to several BrightNetwork careers fairs and networking events, and just went round asking 'would you take me with a 2:2'. Worth asking if only to cross them off the list of potential firms!

    Then just apply for any and all vacancies you can find, but only if you're interested in them and actually want the position!

    So when interviewing for the internship where I had no relevant experience, I kept just trying to relate it back to my degree and where I'd shown those skills. Labs taught me to be analytical, I can critically evaluate data and write reports. Working in a lab group taught me teamwork, organisation and time management (sharing of equipment), how to effectively pool knowledge and ideas in order to get the most out of your project, presentation skills, flexibility when things go wrong / how to adapt an experiment in light of new data etc.

    Whilst the lab itself is obviously irrelevant to accounting/consulting, those skills definitely weren't. So it was about picking relevant examples from my experiences and trying to show how I had the skills they wanted, but hadn't yet had the chance to do it in a relevant setting.

    I honestly believe you can relate *any* experience to any role, you just have to pick the right bits. In order to land my first role working in the lab, I drew on experiences volunteering at homeless shelters and working with special needs children... totally irrelevant!

    A lot of firms rely on online tests too, and if you can pass the numerical and psychometric tests, you're already well on your way!

    What sectors are you looking into? I'd say it's definitely worth trying to talk to some people in the industry, whether that's at careers fairs, or simply by reaching out to people on LinkedIn. You can message and ask if they wouldn't mind a quick phone call/coffee to discuss how you might break into that career yourself. Most people are very happy to talk if you're polite! Consider messaging recruiters - they also might headhunt you, the more active you are on Linkedin the higher your chances of being spotted.
    You mentioned HR - this is particularly applicable for that!
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Without trying to belittle those who get a 2:2
    (Original post by Haviland-Tuf)
    Frankly, I'd be embarassed to graduate from university with 2.2 if I know I am capable of higher and this applies to any degree.
    I achieved all A*s at GCSE and a mix of A*s and As at A level, and then went on to do spectacularly poorly in my second year at uni due to a combination of extenuating circumstances and just really struggling with the volume of content as well as the material itself. It is a complete shock for grades to suddenly drop so far, especially if you're working 100x harder at uni than you ever did at school! Grades don't define you, and I know you said you wouldn't view anyone with a 2:2 as a failure, but please be careful when posting personal views on these sorts of things. I have made my peace with a lower grade, but I know others really struggle with it, and despite you having good intentions when posting, I'm not sure this is necessarily a helpful post - I think we're all well aware that 40% is "laughable" but trust me when I say if that were the mark you'd received in a paper after working really hard, you would not be laughing!

    What's particularly challenging to deal with, is knowing that however well you do in the next set of exams, that poor set of exams will always drag you back down. My degree was graded in a way that will leave me with a 2:2 despite scoring highly in finals, and coming top in the top 10 in the year in labs. Even with a very strong thesis in my masters year, I'm capped at a 2:2 (but equally I cannot drop below this no matter how badly I do this year).

    I think it's a little harsh to say university sets the bar low, or that you'd be embarrassed, when OP is clearly asking for advice on how to progress in a career despite an academic setback / wants some reassurance that a 2:2 isn't the end. Not sure these opinions are helpful to the thread - we're all very aware that a 2:2 isn't ideal, which is why OP is still aiming for a 2:1!
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    (Original post by Kmonster)
    I achieved all A*s at GCSE and a mix of A*s and As at A level, and then went on to do spectacularly poorly in my second year at uni due to a combination of extenuating circumstances and just really struggling with the volume of content as well as the material itself. It is a complete shock for grades to suddenly drop so far, especially if you're working 100x harder at uni than you ever did at school! Grades don't define you, and I know you said you wouldn't view anyone with a 2:2 as a failure, but please be careful when posting personal views on these sorts of things. I have made my peace with a lower grade, but I know others really struggle with it, and despite you having good intentions when posting, I'm not sure this is necessarily a helpful post - I think we're all well aware that 40% is "laughable" but trust me when I say if that were the mark you'd received in a paper after working really hard, you would not be laughing!

    What's particularly challenging to deal with, is knowing that however well you do in the next set of exams, that poor set of exams will always drag you back down. My degree was graded in a way that will leave me with a 2:2 despite scoring highly in finals, and coming top in the top 10 in the year in labs. Even with a very strong thesis in my masters year, I'm capped at a 2:2 (but equally I cannot drop below this no matter how badly I do this year).

    I think it's a little harsh to say university sets the bar low, or that you'd be embarrassed, when OP is clearly asking for advice on how to progress in a career despite an academic setback / wants some reassurance that a 2:2 isn't the end. Not sure these opinions are helpful to the thread - we're all very aware that a 2:2 isn't ideal, which is why OP is still aiming for a 2:1!
    With all due respect I think you should stop virtue signalling and being sanctimonious, we both made it clear that it was personal! I think it is unfair of you to ask people not to be honest with the OP when that's why they asked for when they made this thread. Also I'd like to point, out, and anyone can correct me if I am wrong, the OP is asking if he should work hard for 2:1 (or even a first) or whether they should work just coast to a 2:2. This means that the OP is in fact asking for motivation not coddling and being handled with kid-gloves.

    Would you be upset if I told you that I achieved 75% in assessment about molecular biochemistry last week but I was disappointed as I thought I did particularly well during the test and I revised a lot for it. The idea of missing out on 25% of the paper bothers me and I suspect I'm not the only one that feels this way either.
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    (Original post by Kmonster)
    I achieved all A*s at GCSE and a mix of A*s and As at A level, and then went on to do spectacularly poorly in my second year at uni due to a combination of extenuating circumstances and just really struggling with the volume of content as well as the material itself. It is a complete shock for grades to suddenly drop so far, especially if you're working 100x harder at uni than you ever did at school! Grades don't define you, and I know you said you wouldn't view anyone with a 2:2 as a failure, but please be careful when posting personal views on these sorts of things. I have made my peace with a lower grade, but I know others really struggle with it, and despite you having good intentions when posting, I'm not sure this is necessarily a helpful post - I think we're all well aware that 40% is "laughable" but trust me when I say if that were the mark you'd received in a paper after working really hard, you would not be laughing!

    What's particularly challenging to deal with, is knowing that however well you do in the next set of exams, that poor set of exams will always drag you back down. My degree was graded in a way that will leave me with a 2:2 despite scoring highly in finals, and coming top in the top 10 in the year in labs. Even with a very strong thesis in my masters year, I'm capped at a 2:2 (but equally I cannot drop below this no matter how badly I do this year).

    I think it's a little harsh to say university sets the bar low, or that you'd be embarrassed, when OP is clearly asking for advice on how to progress in a career despite an academic setback / wants some reassurance that a 2:2 isn't the end. Not sure these opinions are helpful to the thread - we're all very aware that a 2:2 isn't ideal, which is why OP is still aiming for a 2:1!

    (Original post by Lily048)
    I know its personal to each person but I am aiming for a 2:1 because I know realistically a first is out of my sights. I am not being defeatist, just realistic and logical (i.e the probable percentage grade for each individual assignment vs credit grade weighting = likelihood of 2:1). I would LOVE a first, but university is hard, and believe it or not accentuating circumstances do happen - why am I aiming for a 2:1? Because my mental health severely deteriorated this year and I ended up having to move out of a student house due to bullying to back home, which means I now have to commute 2 hours to university by train. I have had an incredibly difficult year and the worst part is I cannot explain that to future employers because they don't care about that stuff. But in equal measures a 2:2 would scare me. Opening up my results to see that in front of me makes me stomach drop. But no one can say I haven't worked hard because I have, more than some and University does push a lot of people, so to say it sets the bar low is a bit arrogant IMO..
    I'll reply to both of these at the same time as you both raise similar points, although obviously some parts are in more specific reply.

    I'll preface this with the context of my reply. It was specifically in reply to Joel 96, more specifically the first part of their post "Is a 2:2 really that bad?". I was giving my opinion on why, if I personally achieved a 2:2 I would consider that bad. As I hoped I'd made evident, that is my personal opinion which is obviously based on my experience. If for example I were struggling in my degree then I would obviously consider that a completely different matter. But I'm not, I've consistently achieved high grades rather easily and if that suddenly dropped to a 2:2 when I graduated I would consider that really bad. As I mentioned, it's a purely personal thing based on my experience. I'm not judging other students, I'm not even judging other students on my course that are doing the same work I am. I'm simply saying that as a result of holding myself to a high standard and achieving high grades thus far, I would expect a First when I graduate. It's about picking personally attainable targets and doing whatever you feel is appropriate. Lily mentioned aiming for a 2:1 because that's what she thinks is realistic.

    You both mentioned extenuating circumstances, I'm not going to turn around and say that I still managed to achieve high grades despite that. Instead it really highlights how it is important to do whatever you feel is appropriate for the situation you are in. If something gets in the way, that's fine. It happens, it's life. On an equally personal level, some people will work through extenuating circumstances and still come out with good grades, for others it completely defines their life and there's nothing they can do to get good grades. There's no one size fits all here.

    As far as being helpful, I'll point out as above that I wasn't replying for the OPs sake, but to answer the question. I wasn't going to post anything because this thread was totally irrelevant to me. But I saw a question and wanted to offer my viewpoint in answering that. I am well aware my post is of no use to the OP and that's why I went to such great lengths to make it abundantly clear that I am not trying to cause offense. Because I knew that no matter what, someone was going to get offended or make a post similar to yours.

    I do still stand by what I said. University does set the bar to pass extremely low. No matter how you look at it, 40% would never be acceptable anywhere else. It's a failure at GCSE and if you only do 40% of your work at your job you'd be fired pretty quickly. Fundamentally I think that's part of what is wrong with the university system. The grading scheme is fairly consistent across universities and courses, yet universities make their own decisions on the content. A 40% is low, regardless of whether you are studying STEM at Oxbridge or Gender Studies at an unknown university but what that 40% represents is totally different.

    If I've not already made it clear, the 40% figure is what I'm say is laughably low, not the work it represents. That's why degrees hold so much less meaning, the grade you come out with is not representative of anything you've actually done. You might have done barely any work to get a First or really struggled through just to pass. Or vice versa. Yet those numbers are basically fixed. 40% of something is an objective measure that is a little under half. But 40% of a marathon is far different to 40% of a brisk walk to the shops. That's what I'm trying to get at here with the bar being so low.

    I'll say it again for good measure. I'm not trying to belittle or offend anyone based on the grade they get or the work they do. The numbers alone do not tell the full story but it's also important to remember that numbers have objective connotations. The only way I can be more careful than that is to not say anything at all. But the thing is, life is not problem free and sometimes bad things do happen. I've been as careful as I can when answering and unfortunately if my post still causes extreme grief there's not much I can do. And that's arguably not my problem, nor is TSR going to help fix it. If we take the more brutal, realistic approach, a 2:2 will get in the way and prevent you applying from lots of jobs. People might not want to hear it but it's going to be true. Sugarcoating it or pretending the problem doesn't exist by not posting won't make it go away.


    To keep things a little on track, at a basic level it's really simple. If you aren't happy with getting a 2:2 then do whatever it takes to not get a 2:2. That in itself is largely not useful advice but there isn't really much else to offer when we don't have any details. What I would like to point out though is the wording used. Lily mentioned being in a slump and being concerned about getting a 2:2. I'm not going to tell you how best to cope but rather than focusing on asking how people cope getting 2:2s, focus on fixing whatever is wrong so that you can aim for a First or 2:1. It's fairly evident that getting a 2:2 is not the end of the world, plenty of people have offered that advice here and if you Google it I'm sure you'll find plenty more. If you need to know how to cope in that worst case scenario then that's fine. But equally you also need to focus on what you'll do to avoid that happening.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    I'll reply to both of these at the same time as you both raise similar points, although obviously some parts are in more specific reply.

    I'll preface this with the context of my reply. It was specifically in reply to Joel 96, more specifically the first part of their post "Is a 2:2 really that bad?". I was giving my opinion on why, if I personally achieved a 2:2 I would consider that bad. As I hoped I'd made evident, that is my personal opinion which is obviously based on my experience. If for example I were struggling in my degree then I would obviously consider that a completely different matter. But I'm not, I've consistently achieved high grades rather easily and if that suddenly dropped to a 2:2 when I graduated I would consider that really bad. As I mentioned, it's a purely personal thing based on my experience. I'm not judging other students, I'm not even judging other students on my course that are doing the same work I am. I'm simply saying that as a result of holding myself to a high standard and achieving high grades thus far, I would expect a First when I graduate. It's about picking personally attainable targets and doing whatever you feel is appropriate. Lily mentioned aiming for a 2:1 because that's what she thinks is realistic.

    You both mentioned extenuating circumstances, I'm not going to turn around and say that I still managed to achieve high grades despite that. Instead it really highlights how it is important to do whatever you feel is appropriate for the situation you are in. If something gets in the way, that's fine. It happens, it's life. On an equally personal level, some people will work through extenuating circumstances and still come out with good grades, for others it completely defines their life and there's nothing they can do to get good grades. There's no one size fits all here.

    As far as being helpful, I'll point out as above that I wasn't replying for the OPs sake, but to answer the question. I wasn't going to post anything because this thread was totally irrelevant to me. But I saw a question and wanted to offer my viewpoint in answering that. I am well aware my post is of no use to the OP and that's why I went to such great lengths to make it abundantly clear that I am not trying to cause offense. Because I knew that no matter what, someone was going to get offended or make a post similar to yours.

    I do still stand by what I said. University does set the bar to pass extremely low. No matter how you look at it, 40% would never be acceptable anywhere else. It's a failure at GCSE and if you only do 40% of your work at your job you'd be fired pretty quickly. Fundamentally I think that's part of what is wrong with the university system. The grading scheme is fairly consistent across universities and courses, yet universities make their own decisions on the content. A 40% is low, regardless of whether you are studying STEM at Oxbridge or Gender Studies at an unknown university but what that 40% represents is totally different.

    If I've not already made it clear, the 40% figure is what I'm say is laughably low, not the work it represents. That's why degrees hold so much less meaning, the grade you come out with is not representative of anything you've actually done. You might have done barely any work to get a First or really struggled through just to pass. Or vice versa. Yet those numbers are basically fixed. 40% of something is an objective measure that is a little under half. But 40% of a marathon is far different to 40% of a brisk walk to the shops. That's what I'm trying to get at here with the bar being so low.

    I'll say it again for good measure. I'm not trying to belittle or offend anyone based on the grade they get or the work they do. The numbers alone do not tell the full story but it's also important to remember that numbers have objective connotations. The only way I can be more careful than that is to not say anything at all. But the thing is, life is not problem free and sometimes bad things do happen. I've been as careful as I can when answering and unfortunately if my post still causes extreme grief there's not much I can do. And that's arguably not my problem, nor is TSR going to help fix it. If we take the more brutal, realistic approach, a 2:2 will get in the way and prevent you applying from lots of jobs. People might not want to hear it but it's going to be true. Sugarcoating it or pretending the problem doesn't exist by not posting won't make it go away.


    To keep things a little on track, at a basic level it's really simple. If you aren't happy with getting a 2:2 then do whatever it takes to not get a 2:2. That in itself is largely not useful advice but there isn't really much else to offer when we don't have any details. What I would like to point out though is the wording used. Lily mentioned being in a slump and being concerned about getting a 2:2. I'm not going to tell you how best to cope but rather than focusing on asking how people cope getting 2:2s, focus on fixing whatever is wrong so that you can aim for a First or 2:1. It's fairly evident that getting a 2:2 is not the end of the world, plenty of people have offered that advice here and if you Google it I'm sure you'll find plenty more. If you need to know how to cope in that worst case scenario then that's fine. But equally you also need to focus on what you'll do to avoid that happening.
    I 100% understand what you are saying. And I get it’s ultimately only me that can ‘fix’ the problem here (if anything even needs fixing), but I do tend to go into things with an ‘expect the worst, hope for the best’ so I can avoid disappointment should I get something I’m not best pleased with.
    This won’t stop me working my hardest. No one can say, coming away from my degree, that I did not put the work in. I’m proud to say I have strong work ethics, I don’t procrastinate and I will always try and improve my work where improvement is needed. I’m not one of those people that hands in work last minute or does not proof read. But equally I have had a very hard year and not only that but it’s my final year of uni too. Have I persevered? Yes, I nearly dropped out but I’m still here. But I think everyone will be subjective in that area because you’ll never know my circumstances and never know whether they were ‘workable’ or not, in order to get a first.
    I do agree with you, it’s subjective and people will view a 2:2, 2:1 and 1st differently but I do remain in disagreement that the bar is low. Why? Because A) it’s the first form of education for MOST that is away from home, family, peers and in circumstances many aren’t used to, B) it’s independent study for the first time with no guidance, college/sixth form, high school etc is not the same and it never will be the same as university study, C) in the workplace you go receive guidance regardless what people may think, most high profile jobs don’t accept 40% because you have been taken on having proved yourself, at university they take students on to get them moving, throwing them in at the deep end would achieve nothing but see higher education dip hugely and degree classifications lower massively. It’s ALevel/BTec to University, not Semi-University to University. The jump is probably the biggest you’ll ever do and even people who’ve gone into jobs after graduation have said the jump is not the same. University is made to prep you - college arguably does nothing to prep students for university. Hence why first year is a large hit or miss for people. Like I said, it’s subjective, but because someone has had an obviously easy experience does not equate to everyone else’s experiences who encountered issues for one reason or another - just like you cannot measure a minority ethnic woman’s ability to get a high profile career vs a young upper class Male for example. Seems exaggerated but it’s all relative at the end of the day, whether you agree or not. Mental Health, family background/upbringing, etc, all make contributions to our personal experiences, effectively altering how those experiences play out. Some have it harder than others and it’s those people who that bar is there to take into account in order to give everyone a fair chance to a degree.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    I'll reply to both of these at the same time as you both raise similar points, although obviously some parts are in more specific reply.

    I'll preface this with the context of my reply. It was specifically in reply to Joel 96, more specifically the first part of their post "Is a 2:2 really that bad?". I was giving my opinion on why, if I personally achieved a 2:2 I would consider that bad. As I hoped I'd made evident, that is my personal opinion which is obviously based on my experience. If for example I were struggling in my degree then I would obviously consider that a completely different matter. But I'm not, I've consistently achieved high grades rather easily and if that suddenly dropped to a 2:2 when I graduated I would consider that really bad. As I mentioned, it's a purely personal thing based on my experience. I'm not judging other students, I'm not even judging other students on my course that are doing the same work I am. I'm simply saying that as a result of holding myself to a high standard and achieving high grades thus far, I would expect a First when I graduate. It's about picking personally attainable targets and doing whatever you feel is appropriate. Lily mentioned aiming for a 2:1 because that's what she thinks is realistic.

    You both mentioned extenuating circumstances, I'm not going to turn around and say that I still managed to achieve high grades despite that. Instead it really highlights how it is important to do whatever you feel is appropriate for the situation you are in. If something gets in the way, that's fine. It happens, it's life. On an equally personal level, some people will work through extenuating circumstances and still come out with good grades, for others it completely defines their life and there's nothing they can do to get good grades. There's no one size fits all here.

    As far as being helpful, I'll point out as above that I wasn't replying for the OPs sake, but to answer the question. I wasn't going to post anything because this thread was totally irrelevant to me. But I saw a question and wanted to offer my viewpoint in answering that. I am well aware my post is of no use to the OP and that's why I went to such great lengths to make it abundantly clear that I am not trying to cause offense. Because I knew that no matter what, someone was going to get offended or make a post similar to yours.

    I do still stand by what I said. University does set the bar to pass extremely low. No matter how you look at it, 40% would never be acceptable anywhere else. It's a failure at GCSE and if you only do 40% of your work at your job you'd be fired pretty quickly. Fundamentally I think that's part of what is wrong with the university system. The grading scheme is fairly consistent across universities and courses, yet universities make their own decisions on the content. A 40% is low, regardless of whether you are studying STEM at Oxbridge or Gender Studies at an unknown university but what that 40% represents is totally different.

    If I've not already made it clear, the 40% figure is what I'm say is laughably low, not the work it represents. That's why degrees hold so much less meaning, the grade you come out with is not representative of anything you've actually done. You might have done barely any work to get a First or really struggled through just to pass. Or vice versa. Yet those numbers are basically fixed. 40% of something is an objective measure that is a little under half. But 40% of a marathon is far different to 40% of a brisk walk to the shops. That's what I'm trying to get at here with the bar being so low.

    I'll say it again for good measure. I'm not trying to belittle or offend anyone based on the grade they get or the work they do. The numbers alone do not tell the full story but it's also important to remember that numbers have objective connotations. The only way I can be more careful than that is to not say anything at all. But the thing is, life is not problem free and sometimes bad things do happen. I've been as careful as I can when answering and unfortunately if my post still causes extreme grief there's not much I can do. And that's arguably not my problem, nor is TSR going to help fix it. If we take the more brutal, realistic approach, a 2:2 will get in the way and prevent you applying from lots of jobs. People might not want to hear it but it's going to be true. Sugarcoating it or pretending the problem doesn't exist by not posting won't make it go away.


    To keep things a little on track, at a basic level it's really simple. If you aren't happy with getting a 2:2 then do whatever it takes to not get a 2:2. That in itself is largely not useful advice but there isn't really much else to offer when we don't have any details. What I would like to point out though is the wording used. Lily mentioned being in a slump and being concerned about getting a 2:2. I'm not going to tell you how best to cope but rather than focusing on asking how people cope getting 2:2s, focus on fixing whatever is wrong so that you can aim for a First or 2:1. It's fairly evident that getting a 2:2 is not the end of the world, plenty of people have offered that advice here and if you Google it I'm sure you'll find plenty more. If you need to know how to cope in that worst case scenario then that's fine. But equally you also need to focus on what you'll do to avoid that happening.
    I think you’re forgetting that a levels and gcses are graded on a ums basis

    Even in gcses higher tier maths, 40% has been enough to get a c

    A levels are graded so that 80% UMS means an A. This could mean that you possibly got something like 60% of the actual marks available
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Without trying to belittle those who get a 2:2, I personally would see it as a bad thing if I achieved a 2:2. As someone who spent their school and college life getting As (so 80%+) suddenly dropping to 50%, I'd most definitely feel like a failure. To me personally, even a 2:1 seems like a low grade and I wouldn't ever be happy getting two thirds of the marks. For me it's not about what a 2:2 means but the actual numbers behind university grading. I feel like a 40% to pass is laughable and a 70% for the top grade is almost insulting. If I applied that to real life, it simply wouldn't work. "Oh I won't get fired from my job as long as I do 40% of my job correctly". Or "I only have to do 3 quarters of the work to achieve well in this company". After previous education, University just feels like it sets the bar so exceptionally low that so much of what you do has no meaning.

    I'll reiterate that this is only my personal opinion and I'm not saying anyone who graduates with a 2:2 is a failure.
    Nonsense. 80% UMS could easily mean that you got something like 60% in an exam

    Take A2 OCR biology papers, for example. 90%UMS (A*) has been as low as getting 65% of the actual marks in the exam
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    (Original post by Lily048)
    I do agree with you, it’s subjective and people will view a 2:2, 2:1 and 1st differently but I do remain in disagreement that the bar is low. Why?
    That's absolutely fine, you are free to disagree and I did not post with the intention of trying to convince people, I'm only offering my opinion on the matter. But I think I've already answered the question respectively or why I think it's so low. Quite simply, because 40% of something is a low value. That's the objective opinion because the number by itself is not representative of anything else. If all you know is the 40% boundary then the only way you can judge that is as a number. The only people that really know what that 40% entails are those on the course. It's different for everyone and the only way to accurately define it is with the 40% value. With only that information to work on, the natural conclusion is how that value is exceptionally low.

    40% being a low bar =/= The work you have to do to get 40% is a low bar

    The value itself is a low bar but nobody can judge what that number actually represents. I thought someone might have made the link by now but it should be clear how the mark you receive (either in percentage or grade format) is not representative of what you have actually done. There are some degrees where the work required to get a 40% is easy and there are some where you will struggle. But nobody really knows. What I'm saying is stop putting value on the 40% or the 2:2 or the First. They're largely meaningless terms. I can say that for me personally, a 40% is laughable and a low bar, 70% is easily attainable etc. because I am in that situation. But that is totally useless information to other people. Likewise if you come out with university with a 2:2 or a 2:1 or whatever that only means something to you. To everyone else, it's practically useless information that none the less you might be judged on. In other words, stop putting emphasis on the 2:2 or the 40% because it's a poor form of communication.
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    (Original post by faith 101)
    I think you’re forgetting that a levels and gcses are graded on a ums basis

    Even in gcses higher tier maths, 40% has been enough to get a c

    A levels are graded so that 80% UMS means an A. This could mean that you possibly got something like 60% of the actual marks available
    That's true but is only relevant when you are comparing final grades across exam boards. It's meaningless when the raw data is representative of your actual grade, for example a practice paper or in class test.

    But you've really highlighted my previous points about how the numbers themselves are totally irrelevant and not at all representative of what's going on. Say you get 40% in a test but thanks to UMS that pushes it up to 60% and you walk out with a C for example. None of those categorisations actually provide any meaningful information about what happened. The C and 60% are abstractions of what really happened and the 40% is only useful as raw data once you have the context. Problem of course is that most people don't actually see that raw data. They see the 60% and the C so end up thinking that represents what they did. So all of a sudden, they've gone from getting 60% at GCSE/A Level to dropping to 40% at Degree level. Nothing has really changed, all that happened was the level of abstraction in the middle was removed. But it's perceived as this massive drop. Yet the 40% at Degree level and the 60% UMS are totally worthless by themselves.

    I'll reiterate the previous points I made. The numbers don't accurately represent anything, especially when you factor in the abstraction at UMS. Even with raw information, nobody knows anything more until they have something to apply that data to.
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    My brother got a 2:2 for his first degree as he partied hard during his BSc. Was pretty surprised as he usually didn't have to work that hard for excellent A levels & GCSEs. Somehow he pleaded his way onto a MSc before going on to do a clinical psychology doctorate!!!! Now he has his own business working to help children who are anxious, worried, phobic etc. I don't think it really matters in the long run all that much it is more a question of finding opportunities & making them work for you. I did a 4 year degree and got a first which was a huge surprise. My final year sucked. I found it so difficult to stay motivated and finish my dissertation & do the exam revision. I just wanted it all to be over I was so fed up of it all. In the end I found someone else to work with & we motivated each other by using rewards. We set a goal, then a reward which we could only have once completed. It got me through it & still works as a great technique as I am trying to finish my PhD thesis. Good luck & don't be too hard on yourself. A big stick doesn't work to beat yourself up. Try being kind it works much better.
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    (Original post by drkaryn)
    My brother got a 2:2 for his first degree as he partied hard during his BSc. Was pretty surprised as he usually didn't have to work that hard for excellent A levels & GCSEs. Somehow he pleaded his way onto a MSc before going on to do a clinical psychology doctorate!!!! Now he has his own business working to help children who are anxious, worried, phobic etc. I don't think it really matters in the long run all that much it is more a question of finding opportunities & making them work for you. I did a 4 year degree and got a first which was a huge surprise. My final year sucked. I found it so difficult to stay motivated and finish my dissertation & do the exam revision. I just wanted it all to be over I was so fed up of it all. In the end I found someone else to work with & we motivated each other by using rewards. We set a goal, then a reward which we could only have once completed. It got me through it & still works as a great technique as I am trying to finish my PhD thesis. Good luck & don't be too hard on yourself. A big stick doesn't work to beat yourself up. Try being kind it works much better.
    Thank you that was really motivating to read ☺️ I am doubtful that I’ll ever go on in further education to do a masters or above, simply because I need to achieve a decent income and start working properly, which I couldn’t do whilst in education but I definitely know what you mean about final year. For me I am somewhat motivated (I really want the best grade I can possibly get) but it’s the scary idea I could be doing this work and it actually not be good at all - just handed in my dissertation today funnily enough, which I’ve always remained positive about yet here I am doubtful it’ll amount to anything 😞 I’m trying to not feel sorry for myself and realising nearly every final year Student is in the same headspace but I know what it’s like to hand in a piece of work you think is decent for it to come back and be the complete opposite! Fingers crossed I get that 2:1 (even better if it’s a 1st!)
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    (Original post by Lily048)
    In a slump (final year) and honestly feel like everything I write is complete crap at this point, I’m aiming for a 2:1 (a 1st would be amazing) but right now the future looks bleak and I think I’ll have a full on breakdown if I go online on results day and see a 2:2...I’m losing sleep over the thought.
    So people who’ve been there..how did you react, how have you coped since?
    Got my 2.2 in Biomedical Genetics. Went on to get my masters in Bioinformatics with Distinction. Currently work as a Data Analyst for the NHS, applying to PhDs. Don't let it get you down if it does happen. I was disappointed on the day, but it hasn't been so bad. A 2.2 isn't the end, you're just getting started.
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    (Original post by Connor0912)
    Got my 2.2 in Biomedical Genetics. Went on to get my masters in Bioinformatics with Distinction. Currently work as a Data Analyst for the NHS, applying to PhDs. Don't let it get you down if it does happen. I was disappointed on the day, but it hasn't been so bad. A 2.2 isn't the end, you're just getting started.
    I feel like everyone who got a 2:2 went on to do a masters though which just is not what I want to do - education is making me fall behind and drain me financially, I just don’t believe a masters will help me achieve anything I can’t with the degree I am doing, does that mean as long as you over write your 2:2 with a better HE qualification that’s the only way to get a good job??
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