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People who got a 2:2...How did you take it/What did you do after uni?? watch

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    (Original post by Lily048)
    I feel like everyone who got a 2:2 went on to do a masters though which just is not what I want to do - education is making me fall behind and drain me financially, I just don’t believe a masters will help me achieve anything I can’t with the degree I am doing, does that mean as long as you over write your 2:2 with a better HE qualification that’s the only way to get a good job??
    Not at all, my masters didn't have any impact on my getting my job as a Data Analyst, that was just on the back of the 2.2. After a few years of work experience the degree classification doesn't matter so much, you've just got to focus on getting work experience in a field you want. It's not ideal, sometimes you have to start out a bit lower and work your way up, but it's not the end of the world.

    Also smaller employers often aren't so picky on the degree classification and are often a good place to focus on if it happens, but you don't need to worry about it yet. Most of the people on my course were sure they'd get a 2.2 at undergrad and ended up with a 2.1.
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    (Original post by Lily048)
    In a slump (final year) and honestly feel like everything I write is complete crap at this point, I’m aiming for a 2:1 (a 1st would be amazing) but right now the future looks bleak and I think I’ll have a full on breakdown if I go online on results day and see a 2:2...I’m losing sleep over the thought.
    So people who’ve been there..how did you react, how have you coped since?
    Well if it helps I asked a friend who got a 2.2 how life was for him. He told me he got a job as a "Vehicle Check Engineer".

    I asked him what his normal days where like and it turns out he holds road signs outside Tesco car park....
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    (Original post by trapking)
    Well if it helps I asked a friend who got a 2.2 how life was for him. He told me he got a job as a "Vehicle Check Engineer".

    I asked him what his normal days where like and it turns out he holds road signs outside Tesco car park....
    Why be a ****? What’s the point?..
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    (Original post by Connor0912)
    Not at all, my masters didn't have any impact on my getting my job as a Data Analyst, that was just on the back of the 2.2. After a few years of work experience the degree classification doesn't matter so much, you've just got to focus on getting work experience in a field you want. It's not ideal, sometimes you have to start out a bit lower and work your way up, but it's not the end of the world.

    Also smaller employers often aren't so picky on the degree classification and are often a good place to focus on if it happens, but you don't need to worry about it yet. Most of the people on my course were sure they'd get a 2.2 at undergrad and ended up with a 2.1.
    Any advice for trying to get experience? I’m open to the kind of job field I work in so preferably experience within a firm or large-scale company (or one that is growing) like consultancy, retail, advisor, behind the scenes in the police or financing
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    (Original post by Lily048)
    Any advice for trying to get experience? I’m open to the kind of job field I work in so preferably experience within a firm or large-scale company (or one that is growing) like consultancy, retail, advisor, behind the scenes in the police or financing
    I'll go with the way I did it, which was apply in bulk. It's a numbers game, once you get to interview stage they're past the point where they care about the grades and the paper. In your CV, highlight modules you did well in, transferable skills you've learned. It's all about you as a person after that once you hit interview stage. If you're good at interviews, you'll sail through. If not, get some practice in. I know it's awkward to do it with friends etc, but universities often will help with interview stuff even after you've left if you live close by.

    Another tip is find a contact at any companies you're interested in and enquire, you'd be surprised that sometimes places don't advertise but are willing to consider people who has a specific interest in their company.

    Finally, start applying early. It helps to get applications in before finishing uni, as lots of people wait until the end. I know I did and it didn't help much, so try and get some in early if you can. Don't worry too much about it though, focus on the dissertation and exams etc.

    Hope that helps, I know you'll get the same advice from everyone, but hopefully it did something to ease your worries.
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    (Original post by Connor0912)
    I'll go with the way I did it, which was apply in bulk. It's a numbers game, once you get to interview stage they're past the point where they care about the grades and the paper. In your CV, highlight modules you did well in, transferable skills you've learned. It's all about you as a person after that once you hit interview stage. If you're good at interviews, you'll sail through. If not, get some practice in. I know it's awkward to do it with friends etc, but universities often will help with interview stuff even after you've left if you live close by.

    Another tip is find a contact at any companies you're interested in and enquire, you'd be surprised that sometimes places don't advertise but are willing to consider people who has a specific interest in their company.

    Finally, start applying early. It helps to get applications in before finishing uni, as lots of people wait until the end. I know I did and it didn't help much, so try and get some in early if you can. Don't worry too much about it though, focus on the dissertation and exams etc.

    Hope that helps, I know you'll get the same advice from everyone, but hopefully it did something to ease your worries.
    Thank you so much, this really helped sooth my anxieties about it all! I’m currently applying for jobs in areas I’m interested in now (hoping to dedicate a good day to it tomorrow)
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    (Original post by Lily048)
    Thank you so much, this really helped sooth my anxieties about it all! I’m currently applying for jobs in areas I’m interested in now (hoping to dedicate a good day to it tomorrow)
    No worries, you're welcome to give me a shout if you have any other questions.
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    Gosh I really wouldn’t worry if you get a 2.2 in the end, whatever the reason may be, your grades don’t define you. In real life, unless you wanted to go into academia, work is sooo different to study and in lots of companies you can find that progression in your career will depend more on other skills (i.e networking, experience etc) and at many it won’t matter that you didn’t ace your degree. Like, once you’re working, very few of your colleagues will even care what you got. That might mean that you take your degree to a company or a firm and start off right at the bottom and work your way up, but if you are ambitious enough and smart enough about it you will move very quickly. Similar to some people in this thread I also got a 2.2 after uni. My degree was in biomedical science but after slogging through a horrible third year I swore off lab work for the rest of my life. That left me with absolutely no idea what I wanted as a career, but I knew I couldn’t sit there and do nothing. So I applied for a HR job with absolutely zero expectations for it but they ended up hiring me. After 6 months I was selected for a promotion. I took up the job with the new team and after 10 months with them I was selected for promotion again. I have friends with 2.1s who got into a graduate scheme and are doing fine. I have friends with 2.1s who didn’t get a graduate job and are now bouncing from place to place on fixed term contracts. I have colleagues who got a 2.2 at uni but now hold senior posts in the department. I have friends who never went to uni and are doing well in their careers also. When I was working in HR I knew the staff that coordinated the company’s graduate scheme and you know who they hired for those? One had a PhD and had spoken at international scientific conferences before, the other one was medical doctor who decided to change careers. THATS the kind of people they receive applications from. The application process asked for a 2.1 and it was an entry-level HR job. So even if you did get a 1st, there’s absolutely no guarantee you will get in. It was also well known that at other companies, some of the people who got selected had paid for Coaching through the entire selection process. I mean I don’t want to knock some of these graduate schemes but I’ve seen what they do at accounting and auditing and it just looks sooo dry and they make you work ridiculous hours, like no thanks. The lesson here is: don’t beat yourself down because of your grades, they are NOT THE END. As someone who spent my gcse and a-level years absolutely terrified of getting anything below an A grade, it took me a good long time to understand that. Your career path is what you make it. I get that you might feel that University was pointless if you don’t get the 2.1 that everyone and their mother seems to have achieved. But think about all the skills you learned that were not specific to your degree. Things like critical thinking, your work ethic, analysing a problem and working out how to get around it, taking the initiative, your ability to relate to people and work well in a team. Hell, you can probably find instances in your time away from home when you used these. Because if you are able to demonstrate these things, everything else can and will be taught by your employer. If you do get to results day and see a 2.2, don’t be too downhearted, focus on what you HAVE achieved and not what you didn’t achieve. Remember that the past is the past and it doesn’t decide your future for you, only YOU have the control over that. Good luck! :-)
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    (Original post by Connor0912)
    No worries, you're welcome to give me a shout if you have any other questions.
    Actually I just posted a question about job applications, I’ll paste it here so you can see but just wondering if you had any advice?? Thank you!!

    “There are ministry of justice jobs going in my area for assistants and researchers (I’m currently a final year undergrad) - the application forms online do specify what they are looking for however I just want some extra advice for applying to such jobs? I.e how to tailor my CV/Cover letter, how to answer competency questions and real life scenarios in accordance to what they “want to hear”, how to sell yourself when you have gaps in experience within certain areas, etc.
    Any advice would be very much appreciated!!
    Some things they say on the form:
    - Display of coherent administrative skills (IT, phone consultations, meeting and greeting, good customer/client service, etc)
    - Times where I have shown good improvement
    - Times where I have shown leadership
    - Times where I have shown good communication
    - Times where I have shown quality management
    - Show Drive and reliable in the workplace
    My degree is in Criminal Justice so areas where I can show transferability too!”
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    (Original post by Lily048)
    Actually I just posted a question about job applications, I’ll paste it here so you can see but just wondering if you had any advice?? Thank you!!

    “There are ministry of justice jobs going in my area for assistants and researchers (I’m currently a final year undergrad) - the application forms online do specify what they are looking for however I just want some extra advice for applying to such jobs? I.e how to tailor my CV/Cover letter, how to answer competency questions and real life scenarios in accordance to what they “want to hear”, how to sell yourself when you have gaps in experience within certain areas, etc.
    Any advice would be very much appreciated!!
    Some things they say on the form:
    - Display of coherent administrative skills (IT, phone consultations, meeting and greeting, good customer/client service, etc)
    - Times where I have shown good improvement
    - Times where I have shown leadership
    - Times where I have shown good communication
    - Times where I have shown quality management
    - Show Drive and reliable in the workplace
    My degree is in Criminal Justice so areas where I can show transferability too!”
    Do you have any work experience to draw on from any part time jobs etc? Don't worry if not, just can make things a little bit easier.

    Display of coherent administrative skills (IT, phone consultations, meeting and greeting, good customer/client service, etc)
    IT skills I'm sure you've picked up at uni if you didn't have them already. Any technical software/hardware you've used for your degree will help here, any organisational stuff you've done for your revision etc like revision timetables.

    Times where I have shown good improvement
    Here's where those ever present exam results and module marks come in. There's always something to pull from in there, an exam you didn't do as well as you'd like, feedback from coursework etc.

    Times where I have shown leadership
    Any group work you did in your degree etc. any leadership roles in part time jobs are good to have here too if you've got any.

    Times where I have shown good communication
    Again, group projects, contacting people for dissertation stuff sometimes comes into play here. Any interdisciplinary contacting you've done, say if you've talked to an everyday person about a criminal trial etc for your course/dissertation (Sorry hard to give specific examples when I don't know your course very well)

    Times where I have shown quality management
    Pretty similar to leadership here, time management things again also help

    Show Drive and reliable in the workplace
    Lecture attendance, enthusiasm, what made you want to pursue Criminal Justice. You've done a 3 year course, make sure they know why you did it and what you gained from it.

    Transferable skills
    You'll have a ton of them, even if you don't realise it. Time management, dedication, analytical skills. You'll be meticulous if you're doing Criminal Justice, you'll be very detail orientated which lots of jobs are really keen on. You've gained IT skills, met and spoke to people from lots of different backgrounds, if you've moved away you're confident to be independent.

    And at the end of the day if you're willing to look into it now, you're thinking about the future, happy to ask for help and advice, take other people's opinions on board and make your own decisions. I'm sure you'd be an asset to anyone lucky enough to take you on. Good Luck!
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    (Original post by Connor0912)
    Do you have any work experience to draw on from any part time jobs etc? Don't worry if not, just can make things a little bit easier.

    Display of coherent administrative skills (IT, phone consultations, meeting and greeting, good customer/client service, etc)
    IT skills I'm sure you've picked up at uni if you didn't have them already. Any technical software/hardware you've used for your degree will help here, any organisational stuff you've done for your revision etc like revision timetables.

    Times where I have shown good improvement
    Here's where those ever present exam results and module marks come in. There's always something to pull from in there, an exam you didn't do as well as you'd like, feedback from coursework etc.

    Times where I have shown leadership
    Any group work you did in your degree etc. any leadership roles in part time jobs are good to have here too if you've got any.

    Times where I have shown good communication
    Again, group projects, contacting people for dissertation stuff sometimes comes into play here. Any interdisciplinary contacting you've done, say if you've talked to an everyday person about a criminal trial etc for your course/dissertation (Sorry hard to give specific examples when I don't know your course very well)

    Times where I have shown quality management
    Pretty similar to leadership here, time management things again also help

    Show Drive and reliable in the workplace
    Lecture attendance, enthusiasm, what made you want to pursue Criminal Justice. You've done a 3 year course, make sure they know why you did it and what you gained from it.

    Transferable skills
    You'll have a ton of them, even if you don't realise it. Time management, dedication, analytical skills. You'll be meticulous if you're doing Criminal Justice, you'll be very detail orientated which lots of jobs are really keen on. You've gained IT skills, met and spoke to people from lots of different backgrounds, if you've moved away you're confident to be independent.

    And at the end of the day if you're willing to look into it now, you're thinking about the future, happy to ask for help and advice, take other people's opinions on board and make your own decisions. I'm sure you'd be an asset to anyone lucky enough to take you on. Good Luck!
    You’ve been a tremendous help, thank you so much! And thank you for your kind words! I wish you all the best also ☺️
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    (Original post by Lily048)
    You’ve been a tremendous help, thank you so much! And thank you for your kind words! I wish you all the best also ☺️
    You're very welcome. As always, any questions just reply here or send me a message.
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    (Original post by Lily048)
    In a slump (final year) and honestly feel like everything I write is complete crap at this point, I’m aiming for a 2:1 (a 1st would be amazing) but right now the future looks bleak and I think I’ll have a full on breakdown if I go online on results day and see a 2:2...I’m losing sleep over the thought.
    So people who’ve been there..how did you react, how have you coped since?
    Wasn’t ideal... managed to get on an ACA training contract at a Big 4 anyway
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    (Original post by Kmonster)
    why would it matter if you're at Oxbridge?


    OP, there are plenty of grad schemes accepting students with a 2:2. These include (but are not limited to) the big four accounting firms, finance roles (eg Lloyds), civil service roles, 'in house' accounting or finance roles for large companies, a lot of smaller firms, publishing houses...

    Ultimately if you're looking to boost your application, try to get some experience before you graduate / arrange it for the summer after graduation so that you can put it as a future work placement on your CV. Any 'lower' grades can always be 'dragged up' by some experience, relevant or otherwise.
    Source: will be graduating with a 2:2 this year but have landed my dream job (with great career prospects for progression too, my degree will not hold me back!)
    Employers don't care what Uni you went to or what grade you had except for these two (and possibly some others) because they are known as very prestigious Universities and qualifications from there are valued higher due to the higher standard
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    Ahhhhh, a 2:2 thread that I somehow missed at the time of original posting! :eek:

    (Original post by Lily048)
    So people who’ve been there..how did you react, how have you coped since?
    OP, I really hope you're doing OK at the moment and that you manage the final hurdles to getting to the end of your degree OK (am imagining you may have some summer exams this month and/or next?) :hugs:

    To answer the questions you've posed: I got a 2.2 eight years ago (my average was 57, with module grades ranging from 41-70). I appealed it (which was highly difficult to do in the first place, because my uni is quite stringent about who can and can't appeal, and on what grounds) but they said unless I could actually prove wrongdoing on the Chief Examiner's part, my appeal couldn't be taken any further :nope:

    It was - still is - devastating for me, tbh. I nearly died (literally) trying to do my Finals, and it felt/feels like a huge smack in the face to receive a classification that I felt would define the rest of my life, that wasn't representative of my capabilities. I was initially a bit philosophical, being like "well at least I'm still here and actually passed", but the disappointment soon set in and continues to haunt me. I spend a lot of time being very angry about it, blaming both myself and others for how things panned out.

    Realistically, as others on here have said of those they know, or have proven themselves, getting a 2.2 doesn't define your life or your career moves for the most part. Some doors will be closed to you if you end up getting a 2.2 - certain graduate schemes, yada yada. But as others have said, once you've somehow got your foot in a door in terms of getting experience, then that begins to be the thing that counts more.

    After the car crash that was my undergrad music degree, I swore I'd never set foot in a uni again. But I soon became bored and missed it. So I enrolled on a part-time MA course, to occupy my time. That still didn't feel like I was doing enough, and I was worried about not having any proper work experience on my CV. So I applied around and had some interviews for unpaid internships. (I have to stress that I am lucky enough to live with my parents in London, so it was easier for me to do unpaid stuff than it is for most people my age at that time.) Even though I had a bare CV, I was invited to an interview by a leading arts organisation, who were interested in what I'd done extra-curricular-wise at uni.

    Though I had no proper work experience, I used extra-curriculars from uni and my enthusiasm to demonstrate all the necessary skills and personal qualities needed for the role. I secured a six month unpaid internship with this organisation and did that alongside my MA. After my MA, the experience at the arts organisation lead to a six month paid music education internship elsewhere. That in turn led to paid freelance work with that company, which lasted a few years (3-4 years). Alongside the paid freelance work, I did another six month unpaid internship, just to make sure my CV was looking busy!

    I left that second unpaid internship to start a PhD in 2014, which I am doing part-time. It's unfunded and slow moving but I'm enjoying it

    Last year, I decided that I wanted to use my lived experience of mental health issues to help others. So I did a complete career change and managed to bag a job at a local branch of the mental health charity, Mind. It was part-time but with quite a good salary, given I had no experience in that field! The job didn't work out for various reasons, and so I left after 6 months on health grounds.

    I've not had the most exciting career paths ever by some people's standards, but I've enjoyed the ride! I hope me sharing a bit encourages you to see it's not all doom and gloom with a 2.2!
 
 
 
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