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    Hi

    1. As an SME that recruits graduate IT candidates, i can 100% guarantee that which University you qualified from has absolutely no bearing on suitability - we are looking for passion, real desire and interest within the field, commitment I.e that if you join us you will work hard and apply yourself to learn the job ( those deluded that think the degree in itself makes them the finished article need not apply)

    2. I would say that you need to be happy at the University. If you don't enjoy where you study it will likely impact on your chance of success.

    3. Despite the above I have however come across employers (mainly large cap) that are looking and select graduates only from the RG or more prestigious uni,s - I'm not saying that's right but maybe if two candidates are equal in all ways, the Uni might be the deciding factor?

    In all though probably being happy in your study in the right environment for you trumps all. Certainly you need to give it consideration - if you show enough determination and work hard enough you can succeed anywhere.
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    (Original post by Dankmemesenpai)
    When have you last looked or even applied for a job. I did so yesterday.
    Pretty much every year of my life since 16.

    Grad schemes are pretty much just a game of application numbers, having a good CV, some aptitude for tests, people/communication skills at ACs, and a bit of luck. Several years of work experience isn't necessary.

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    Pick which one you are most comfortable at. Yes league tables do make a difference, but honestly it is much more about ranking in subject area than it is about overall league place. Trust me I did my undergrad and postgrad at the same uni. Because the course at postgrad was one of the best in the country, although the uni itself is not, employers like it because they understand how important the course itself is. Rather than the overall uni ranking.

    But go with where you feel you will be most comfortable. League tables and employablity mean nothing if you go to a uni you don't feel comfortable at, because you won't do as well personally, which will impact your experience and degree overall.
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    I was in the same boat as you a couple years back. I got an offer from an RG uni and an offer from a non-RG uni. Like you, I was thinking, "I should go for the RG because it's an RG and that'll look good on my CV." But for most employers, they don't care where you got your degree so long as you've got one, so that seemed like a silly reason to take it.

    I then realised that I preferred the non-RG uni. The RG uni was too big. Lecture halls were ginormous, and classes were huge, so I realised that I was sure to get swallowed up in the masses. In the non-RG uni, though, classes are a reasonable size, and it's manageable for the lecturers to build up a repertoire with each student. This is good because you'll want your face to be remembered amidst the hundreds, not get lost in the thousands. Another plus to this is that it's not so competitive. I'm not being modest when I say I'm quite slow, and yet I managed to come top of the class in my freshman year at the non-RG uni: a great achievement which will be mentioned in my diploma so that I can show off to employers, and one which I would never have achieved if I'd been up against people from the RG uni.

    This doesn't mean there's no competition at all, though. It'd be foolish to think people can waltz into a university without being at least a little academic. So you don't need to worry about finding your kind of people in a lower-rank uni. There'll be folks from all walks of life, and there's someone for everyone. I've made friends with a lot of interesting, intelligent people, even in my little corner of the league table. I'd say it's easier to meet people in a smaller uni, in fact. Sure, there's more people to meet at an RG uni; but a non-RG uni is more close-knit, in my experience. Even the lecturers are more friendly! When I went to the open-day at the RG uni, the lecturers seemed no-nonsense, all-business, and quite distant. At the non-RG uni open-day, the lecturers all seemed nice and happy and appeared to get along with their colleagues and weren't afraid to have a laugh about academics. It seemed like the more welcoming environment to learn in.

    That's another reason I chose the RG uni: the vibe it gave off felt very much like my hometown, so I figured going someplace like that would make me less likely to get homesick. And my theory's paid off! I never feel like I'm walking in a different city; I feel like I'm walking around my hometown, so I never miss home. It makes living there very comfortable. And living in a smaller place is definitely cheaper than living near a big-shot RG uni. That's another plus.

    RG unis seem like they have it all. But non-RG unis can keep up pretty well. They offer a lot of the same opportunities and experiences which can improve your employability. I'd even go so far as to say that RG unis being better is a myth. So I wouldn't make my decision based on the RG uni being a status symbol or more academic. If I was you, I'd make my decision based on the three C's: comfort, cost, and course. Do the uni, the place it's in, and the people in it feel right to you? Do you think you'll be able to make rent without going hungry? Does it offer the course you want, the way you want it to be run?

    It really seems like you prefer the non-RG uni. And, as someone who is currently doing well at a non-RG uni and doesn't regret not going to the RG uni, I can reassure you there's nothing wrong with that preference. Heck, you could even choose both: I have friends who did their degree in a non-RG uni and applied to do their Masters at an RG uni after. So if you really regret your choice, there's another way to do what you wish you had. Just think about what you really want - where you want to be during these precious years, where you want to go after them, and which uni can help you realise those wants the most - and I wish you luck in your decision. As long as you follow your heart, I'm sure you'll make the right one.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Rip
    Hmm, that's not needed Prince.

    And I've hired some excellent candidates from Bournemouth.

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    Hi . Go with your gut feel , it has to be about the course and it ticking the boxes of what you are interested in. Have you been to a departmental day ?if not it is so important to meet the lecturers, can you understand them? A friend is studying Math and at a RG uni finds it difficult to understand over half of the lecturers due to heavy accents so is struggling with some topics, are the other students on the course like minded? Can you imagine discussing topic / group work with them . Good luck if you are happy you will do well where ever you choose to go .
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    (Original post by Notoriety)
    Yes, but OP is not comparing the Russell Groups with all non-Russell Groups. OP is looking at Edinburgh against Aberdeen, which the research does not address.
    Fair enough, but it's still relevant to the topic. As well as people like me who weren't aware of such research. 😊
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    (Original post by Anon736)
    Wow you must be from London as well, which unis?
    Actually I’m from Oxford! I was deciding between Oxford Brookes, Leicester, or Worcester. (However I didn’t get the grades for Leicester in the end) I chose Worcester in the end even though it’s far from home
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    (Original post by RobotStudent)
    I was in the same boat as you a couple years back. I got an offer from an RG uni and an offer from a non-RG uni. Like you, I was thinking, "I should go for the RG because it's an RG and that'll look good on my CV." But for most employers, they don't care where you got your degree so long as you've got one, so that seemed like a silly reason to take it.

    I then realised that I preferred the non-RG uni. The RG uni was too big. Lecture halls were ginormous, and classes were huge, so I realised that I was sure to get swallowed up in the masses. In the non-RG uni, though, classes are a reasonable size, and it's manageable for the lecturers to build up a repertoire with each student. This is good because you'll want your face to be remembered amidst the hundreds, not get lost in the thousands. Another plus to this is that it's not so competitive. I'm not being modest when I say I'm quite slow, and yet I managed to come top of the class in my freshman year at the non-RG uni: a great achievement which will be mentioned in my diploma so that I can show off to employers, and one which I would never have achieved if I'd been up against people from the RG uni.

    This doesn't mean there's no competition at all, though. It'd be foolish to think people can waltz into a university without being at least a little academic. So you don't need to worry about finding your kind of people in a lower-rank uni. There'll be folks from all walks of life, and there's someone for everyone. I've made friends with a lot of interesting, intelligent people, even in my little corner of the league table. I'd say it's easier to meet people in a smaller uni, in fact. Sure, there's more people to meet at an RG uni; but a non-RG uni is more close-knit, in my experience. Even the lecturers are more friendly! When I went to the open-day at the RG uni, the lecturers seemed no-nonsense, all-business, and quite distant. At the non-RG uni open-day, the lecturers all seemed nice and happy and appeared to get along with their colleagues and weren't afraid to have a laugh about academics. It seemed like the more welcoming environment to learn in.

    That's another reason I chose the RG uni: the vibe it gave off felt very much like my hometown, so I figured going someplace like that would make me less likely to get homesick. And my theory's paid off! I never feel like I'm walking in a different city; I feel like I'm walking around my hometown, so I never miss home. It makes living there very comfortable. And living in a smaller place is definitely cheaper than living near a big-shot RG uni. That's another plus.

    RG unis seem like they have it all. But non-RG unis can keep up pretty well. They offer a lot of the same opportunities and experiences which can improve your employability. I'd even go so far as to say that RG unis being better is a myth. So I wouldn't make my decision based on the RG uni being a status symbol or more academic. If I was you, I'd make my decision based on the three C's: comfort, cost, and course. Do the uni, the place it's in, and the people in it feel right to you? Do you think you'll be able to make rent without going hungry? Does it offer the course you want, the way you want it to be run?

    It really seems like you prefer the non-RG uni. And, as someone who is currently doing well at a non-RG uni and doesn't regret not going to the RG uni, I can reassure you there's nothing wrong with that preference. Heck, you could even choose both: I have friends who did their degree in a non-RG uni and applied to do their Masters at an RG uni after. So if you really regret your choice, there's another way to do what you wish you had. Just think about what you really want - where you want to be during these precious years, where you want to go after them, and which uni can help you realise those wants the most - and I wish you luck in your decision. As long as you follow your heart, I'm sure you'll make the right one.
    Thanks so much for your reply! I'm happy you made the right decision and I think you're right about all the things you're mentioning . Honestly I much preferred the environment at the non-RG uni because it's all a bit more small-scale indeed, and I think that suits me better. I think I'm gonna firm the non-RG uni but I'll sleep on it a couple more nights to be certain .

    (Original post by Jfer)
    Hi . Go with your gut feel , it has to be about the course and it ticking the boxes of what you are interested in. Have you been to a departmental day ?if not it is so important to meet the lecturers, can you understand them? A friend is studying Math and at a RG uni finds it difficult to understand over half of the lecturers due to heavy accents so is struggling with some topics, are the other students on the course like minded? Can you imagine discussing topic / group work with them . Good luck if you are happy you will do well where ever you choose to go .
    I did visit both unis and spoke to some lecturers! I'm worried about the English in general as it's not my first language but I think I'll get used to it (and the accents hopefully). Thank you for your advice!
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    Hi,I’m not at a RG uni despite having applied to and visited many and I can say that choosing my current uni was the best choice I ever made. It depends on what you want but I wanted a small campus uni and that’s worked out much better for me.
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Hmm, that's not needed Prince.

    And I've hired some excellent candidates from Bournemouth.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Sorry, knee jerk reaction
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    Hey!I was in the same position last year - I actually applied and got an offer to 4 Russell group unis, and decided to go to the only one that was further down the league board. I could've gone to any of them - I worked hard enough and got the grades, so it could have happened. However, I knew that I loved the one I chose, and for me that was enough. I definitely doubted myself to begin with, and I would be lying if I said I hadn't thought 'what if...?' about the other unis. But I am truly happy here - it depends on what is right for you. Leena Norms on youtube (justkissmyfrog) made a video about her opinion on this - she went to Aberystwyth, and she feels the same as me - it's down to you and your preferences! You'll know which one is right for you.
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    Hey!
    I was in the same position last year - I actually applied and got an offer to 4 Russell group unis, and decided to go to the only one that was further down the league board. I could've gone to any of them - I worked hard enough and got the grades, so it could have happened. However, I knew that I loved the one I chose, and for me that was enough. I definitely doubted myself to begin with, and I would be lying if I said I hadn't thought 'what if...?' about the other unis. But I am truly happy here - it depends on what is right for you. Leena Norms on youtube (justkissmyfrog) made a video about her opinion on this - she went to Aberystwyth, and she feels the same as me - it's down to you and your preferences! You'll know which one is right for you
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    I chose a lower ranking uni over a Russell Group for undergraduate. Ended up staying there for my MSc. Now I’m doing my PhD at a Russell Group and I kind of miss my old uni.
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    (Original post by MeganHolly-Wood)
    Hi,I’m not at a RG uni despite having applied to and visited many and I can say that choosing my current uni was the best choice I ever made. It depends on what you want but I wanted a small campus uni and that’s worked out much better for me.
    (Original post by sophie.eleri)
    Hey!I was in the same position last year - I actually applied and got an offer to 4 Russell group unis, and decided to go to the only one that was further down the league board. I could've gone to any of them - I worked hard enough and got the grades, so it could have happened. However, I knew that I loved the one I chose, and for me that was enough. I definitely doubted myself to begin with, and I would be lying if I said I hadn't thought 'what if...?' about the other unis. But I am truly happy here - it depends on what is right for you. Leena Norms on youtube (justkissmyfrog) made a video about her opinion on this - she went to Aberystwyth, and she feels the same as me - it's down to you and your preferences! You'll know which one is right for you.
    (Original post by Medici103)
    I chose a lower ranking uni over a Russell Group for undergraduate. Ended up staying there for my MSc. Now I’m doing my PhD at a Russell Group and I kind of miss my old uni.
    Hi! It's nice to hear that the three of you chose the lower ranking uni and had it work out for you! Hearing these kinds of stories makes me more confident in turning down the RG uni, thank you!
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    (Original post by hysterria)
    Hi TSR,

    I have an offer from a very prestigious RG uni, top 10 in the UK. Obviously I should be happy about having the opportunity to go to such a great uni, but I'm seriously considering turning it down in favour of a much less prestigious university (about 30 places lower in the league tables).

    I've visited both unis and preferred the less prestigious one, because it's more of a campus uni, all a bit more small-scale, and the staff were much more friendly. It seemed to be a place that suits me better, and I also prefer the course content. It's also quite highly regarded for my course, hmore so than the RG uni. However, I do think that the people at the RG uni will be more academically inclined and since I'm quite academical myself, maybe it'll be easier for me to make friends there. And I've just read so much about attending a good uni really helping in further study/employment, so maybe it'd just be plain stupid to turn the RG uni down.

    I'm really unsure of what to do, advice would be more than welcome
    If the RG Uni doesn't feel like it's the right fit for you, don't go there. I know people do look at League tables, but honestly, they don't mean anything. The only place league tables are meaningful in is sport.
    I know someone who goes to a RG Uni, and honestly, their support servs are ****. They would not even give them time off when parent had a stroke, and when they had concussion, they would not allow time off. They arevway too focussed on results, not enough focus, if any at allnon people.
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    (Original post by hysterria)
    Hi TSR,

    I have an offer from a very prestigious RG uni, top 10 in the UK. Obviously I should be happy about having the opportunity to go to such a great uni, but I'm seriously considering turning it down in favour of a much less prestigious university (about 30 places lower in the league tables).

    I've visited both unis and preferred the less prestigious one, because it's more of a campus uni, all a bit more small-scale, and the staff were much more friendly. It seemed to be a place that suits me better, and I also prefer the course content. It's also quite highly regarded for my course, hmore so than the RG uni. However, I do think that the people at the RG uni will be more academically inclined and since I'm quite academical myself, maybe it'll be easier for me to make friends there. And I've just read so much about attending a good uni really helping in further study/employment, so maybe it'd just be plain stupid to turn the RG uni down.

    I'm really unsure of what to do, advice would be more than welcome
    If I was you I will still think about the Russel and see about employability for the Course.
    If you want to do PhD then go for the prestigious Uni.
    If you like the course at RG and employability is good then you can opt for RG.

    Less prestigious Unis are good for Vocational courses such as Nursing, Teaching, Health care courses such as occupational therapy etc.
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    May I ask where you got the rankings for neuroscience courses specifically?
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    (Original post by EleaGR)
    May I ask where you got the rankings for neuroscience courses specifically?
    I sadly couldn't find any neuroscience-specific rankings so I looked at anatomy & physiology (as I think that's closest):
    https://www.thecompleteuniversitygui...6%20Physiology
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    (Original post by hysterria)
    I sadly couldn't find any neuroscience-specific rankings so I looked at anatomy & physiology (as I think that's closest):
    https://www.thecompleteuniversitygui...6%20Physiology
    I was wondering about it, as my daughter was once torn between medicine, neuroscience and biomedical science, and apart from medicine courses we couldn't find relative rankings.

    So, my point is that your assumption of Aberdeen being a better course, ranked higher than Edinburgh, is rather subjective. I've heard good things about Aberdeen for certain courses, but you should think about it and research it a bit before making your decision. Neuroscience is not a Business degree. You should have an idea of what you want to do in the future or at least what your options are, and which options are offered if you go through one Uni or through the other one. In certain courses "Prestige" Unis give you a lot more opportunities for your future, like exposure to research teams and internships, or post graduate offers in great Unis worldwide. A friendly University and a nice campus is what everybody would like, but sometimes you need to get out of your comfort zone to thrive. It all depends on you, your dreams and aspirations. And if you're into Neuroscience I bet you must have lots of them!
 
 
 
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