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    Does the Ecole polytechique has an only bachelor's degree?

    I was looking in their website and I didn't find the option to chose other courses.
    https://portail.polytechnique.edu/ba...ew/selectivity.

    Thanks
    WiSi.
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    (Original post by WiSi)
    Does the Ecole polytechique has an only bachelor's degree?

    I was looking in their website and I didn't find the option to chose other courses.
    https://portail.polytechnique.edu/ba...ew/selectivity.

    Thanks
    WiSi.
    Well, if you couldn't find anything other than the Bachelor's programmes, that rather suggests that they don't offer anything else. What had you in mind?

    Update:
    Googling 'Ecole Polytechnique Masters' leads you to this: www.polytechnique.edu/en/masters-programs
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    (Original post by Minerva)
    Well, if you couldn't find anything other than the Bachelor's programmes, that rather suggests that they don't offer anything else. What had you in mind?

    Update:
    Googling 'Ecole Polytechnique Masters' leads you to this: www.polytechnique.edu/en/masters-programs
    I asked if they have an unique Bachelor degree where you study more things, instead of the possibility to chose what you want.
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    (Original post by WiSi)
    I asked if they have an unique Bachelor degree where you study more things, instead of the possibility to chose what you want.
    I'm not sure I understand what you mean? If you need to know how much choice you have over the modules that you do for a give degree, I suspect you'd have to look at the course descriptions. If all else fails, email them and ask?
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    (Original post by Minerva)
    I'm not sure I understand what you mean? If you need to know how much choice you have over the modules that you do for a give degree, I suspect you'd have to look at the course descriptions. If all else fails, email them and ask?
    I will do, but if you look properly, it seems that they have no choice about the bachelor degree, there is only one type, otherwise you have no alternatives.
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    (Original post by WiSi)
    I will do, but if you look properly, it seems that they have no choice about the bachelor degree, there is only one type, otherwise you have no alternatives.
    You mean https://portail.polytechnique.edu/ba...us/curriculum? It looks to me like there is one degree that they award but within that quite a lot of choice about what you do. Might not suit everyone, but they certainly seem to be looking for high achieving students.
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    (Original post by Minerva)
    You mean https://portail.polytechnique.edu/ba...us/curriculum? It looks to me like there is one degree that they award but within that quite a lot of choice about what you do. Might not suit everyone, but they certainly seem to be looking for high achieving students.
    It's like a degree with a generic preparation, there are the % of the subjects of the course.
    I don't know what to say about, I mean, does they have an only bachelor's degree?
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    That's weird, I mean, after the process of Bologna, not all the universities should have the same rules?
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    (Original post by WiSi)
    X
    I believe artful_lounger knows a bit about X (École Polytechnique), perhaps he can give you a more detailed answer... but as far as I know, X has two different types of bachelor programme: the Ingénieur Polytechnicien course which is a bit like the UK MEng degree (but much more prestigious), and English-taught BSc degrees in Mathematics and Economics, Mathematics and Computer Science, and Mathematics and Physics.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    I believe artful_lounger knows a bit about X (École Polytechnique), perhaps he can give you a more detailed answer... but as far as I know, X has two different types of bachelor programme: the Ingénieur Polytechnicien course which is a bit like the UK MEng degree (but much more prestigious), and English-taught BSc degrees in Mathematics and Economics, Mathematics and Computer Science, and Mathematics and Physics.
    Thanks for the help, I hope your friend will give more details.
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    (Original post by WiSi)
    Thanks for the help, I hope your friend will give more details.
    It might help if you asked some specific questions and gave us some info about what it is you want to do/study.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    It might help if you asked some specific questions and gave us some info about what it is you want to do/study.
    Well, honestly, due to the fact that in my country there aren't great universities, I'm looking outside, possibly in the EU, about where to go.
    I don't have a specific course I want to join, because there are a lots of differences between countries, so in order to find a good universities I can make compromises.

    I'm interested in STEM.

    Thanks.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    I believe artful_lounger knows a bit about X (École Polytechnique), perhaps he can give you a more detailed answer... but as far as I know, X has two different types of bachelor programme: the Ingénieur Polytechnicien course which is a bit like the UK MEng degree (but much more prestigious), and English-taught BSc degrees in Mathematics and Economics, Mathematics and Computer Science, and Mathematics and Physics.
    Thanks for the tag

    (Original post by WiSi)
    Thanks for the help, I hope your friend will give more details.
    So, the French system is a bit different, as far as the Grandes Écoles go. I'll try to make it more accessible and not just info-dump but I probably will xD

    For the GEs (including l'X which is the usual nickname of École Polytechnique), French students will normally spend 2 years studying the classe préparatoire aux grandes écoles (CPGEs) after completing their high school level studies (the bacc, in France). You can sort of think of this as studying for the first two years of a bachelors degree, and there are different routes for different areas. For engineering, and especially the "top" GEs like l'X and ENS Paris (Ulm), the usual path is MP* (maths/physics) where you cover undergraduate real analysis and linear algebra (from a distinctly abstract/formal viewpoint), and typical early undergraduate physics, especially classical mechanics and electromagnetism, as well as various other topics (also languages). After this they take a set of national entrance exams and are ranked - with the top students going to the top schools, and so on and so forth. l'X specifically also has a physical education/ability test.

    They then go on (they hope ) to one of the GEs. Once there, they study for 3-4 years and gain the schools engineering diploma, which is normally at the M2 level in the French (possibly bologna) process - i.e. advanced masters. The total time to gain the diploma is thus normally 5 years, or 6 sometimes (usually if some industrial placement or less commonly study abroad). l'X is a bit "special" in how they do things (like Oxbridge in the UK, for example) in that the first year doesn't start until halfway through the usual academic year (in January/Februrary I believe). This is due to it formally being a military associated institution, and the French students go through basic training up to this point. International students will instead have French language instruction and immersion for non-Francophone students, while Francophones will work in a civil service area. After the first year it follows a typical timetable, then in the 4th year (which seems somewhat unique to l'X, as I can tell) usually students do various things (my comments in square brackets and italics - content from the l'X site):
    "
    -For the 4th-year, students may choose from the following options:
    -training offered by a government administrative body or organization, [this for example may include joining the fabled corps des mines, which holds several seats for the top students at l'X]
    -specialized studies at a partner engineering school [these are articulated agreements as I understand - I don't know what they have currently though, other than their own programmes]
    -a Master's program in France or abroad, [this could be pretty much anything, HEC, Cambridge, Harvard, whatever]
    -doctoral research (PhD)
    "

    After this they receive the schools engineering diploma.

    However for non French students, the CPGE route isn't available (as these are only offered through specialised lycées which you may be able to get admission to but are expensive and it may well be difficult to arrange), the format depends somewhat on where you're from. Francophone countries can offer the same entrance exams, but non-Francophone students sit different exams (which may be in English). Typically, and this is the relevant part, this is after doing 2-3 years in a bachelors degree covering the relevant material. Specifically, they must have under a certain level of ECTS (180 I believe but definitely double check this) which corresponds to 2-3 years of study. In terms of UK universities, the only courses that teach the relevant analysis and linear algebra in the formal proof based format are maths degrees - these often cover some or most of the physics content as well, from a theoretical point of view (which is acceptable - they don't really care about experimental background as I understand). You then sit these exams for international students (in English or French - also I believe these are specific to l'X, so you won't be able to apply with them to other GEs, whereas the national exams are applicable for a range of GEs) including an oral exam (which may be in English as well from what I can tell).

    The new BSc is essentially another route into the diploma for international students, as it dovetails onto the Ingénieur Polytechnicien diploma - which itself can dovetail to a number of their "advanced masters" programmes for the final year study, as above.

    In essence, the BSc is more of a new pathway, than the main attraction - which has been and seems to remain to be the engineering diploma (Cycle d'Ingénieur Polytechnicien). The latter is a 4 year programme, beginning from 2 years post school leaver age; the former can be entered into by school leavers, and may go onto the latter.

    Caveat emptor:

    Spoiler:
    Show

    A lot of this reseach was done by myself several years ago, and may not be completely up to date. Also I have never actually applied to nor attended any of the GEs, so someone who has been through the process will probably have more accurate information. It may be worth noting, you can only apply if you're under 25 (or 26, maybe, I believe) at l'X - however, this is kind of a murky area as the other GEs were forced to stop placing age limits by the French goverment as it is a form of discrimination, and the only argument for l'X is that the French students are military personnel and so they can impose that restriction. This might be possible to challenged for an international student, as they do not join the French military however. Finally, all students who receive funding from the state to go to l'X (an other GEs) are formally entering into a contract with the state to remain and work in the service of the state for a specified period after completing their studies - I think it's 8 years. For French students at l'X, this is within the military (it may also be able to be in the civil service), while others would work in the civil service. If they want to take a job in industry the company will have to pay the equivalent cost to the French government - for French companies, this is typical and known as the "pantoufle" and it's not unusual I believe.
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    (Original post by WiSi)
    Well, honestly, due to the fact that in my country there aren't great universities, I'm looking outside, possibly in the EU, about where to go.
    I don't have a specific course I want to join, because there are a lots of differences between countries, so in order to find a good universities I can make compromises.

    I'm interested in STEM.

    Thanks.
    You may want to look into Scottish unis, as for EU students (at least currently - Brexit pending) SAAS pays the tuition fees, I believe - so it's a lot cheaper than a lot of other options. They also have a number of excellent universities, both generally and in STEM - St Andrews, Edinburgh, Glasgow and Aberdeen are the "golden oldies" and generally highly regarded, while Heriot-Watt and Strathclyde are particularly known for their STEM courses. I believe Dundee also has some good courses particularly in the chemical engineering/industry vein. Your profile indicates you're in Italy, so I'm not sure if you're Italian, but I hear Tor Vergata and la Sapienza (the latter I've actually heard some mixed opinions on but, this was from a fairly small sample) are quite good for engineering and similar, and may be of interest.

    If you have outstanding grades and extracurriculars, the US may be worth considering (specifically, need-blind universities as they should pay your way through if they accept you - although competition is fierce, and even more so for international students I believe). MIT, CalTech, the Ivy league and Stanford are the most immediately notable ones that fall into this category - however I would recommend considering e.g. Scottish, EU, and even English unis before this just because it's much less difficult (and awkward, for that matter) to apply and be accepted to these courses.
 
 
 
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