BigAls
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Anyone bought driving test routes? If so did it help?
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Dez
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#2
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What do you mean? How can you "buy" a test route? Is it some site that claims to provide you with a set of routes used by DVSA examiners? If so it's 100% snake oil, i.e. a complete scam.
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BigAls
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#3
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Not sure how you think its a scan
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nevershear
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#4
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(Original post by Dez)
What do you mean? How can you "buy" a test route? Is it some site that claims to provide you with a set of routes used by DVSA examiners? If so it's 100% snake oil, i.e. a complete scam.
He's been linking it on few threads, it's basically gps routes you can download from "newdriverprogramme.com"

I routed it out as a scam a month ago on YT and they had the video taken down lol. A lot of the routes were either inaccurate or didn't make sense, fortunately it didn't cost me a penny.
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Dez
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(Original post by BigAls)
Not sure how you think its a scan
First off because fixed test routes don't technically exist, an examiner can adjust routes on-the-fly if needed (e.g. to avoid traffic or roadworks). Second, because test routes are pretty closely guarded information at the DVSA and they also change quite frequently. Third, because the practical driving test just had a major overhaul with the sat nav thing, so there's no chance all the test routes for every test centre in the UK is actually known when the new test has only been in operation for a few months.

Test routes are completely worthless information anyway. What is the point in memorising all 100+ potential routes a test centre can give you? None whatsoever. Improve your driving skill instead and you'll be able to drive on any road the examiner sends you down, regardless of whether it's on a fixed route or not. Don't waste your time trying to game the system.
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BigAls
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#6
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Thank you, iv bought them but I will email them with those points
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Martained
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#7
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Not sure I agree with Dez. I purchased test routes and found them to be very helpful with passing my test. I agree there is no point trying to memorising the routes, but using the routes I was able to drive roads that came up in my test.
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DrivingTestPro
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#8
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Dez is wrong about test routes being made up on the fly. Official guidance for examiners tells them to follow the route whenever possible. They have to write a report about any route changes. Most test centres have about 15 routes. It can help to know the roads that can come up rather than any specific route as many routes share roads.
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Ps0d94
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#9
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I have just purchased it and nothing! I have been waiting for it but they have not send a hint of the product they promised. I will wait until they reply. I'll confirm later if their product is legit.
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Student1191
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#10
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(Original post by BigAls)
Anyone bought driving test routes? If so did it help?
Your instructor should be teaching you on the test route roads most of the time
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It's****ingWOODY
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You can Google the test routes in your local area in most cases anyway, it's highly likely that one of the driving schools in your area will have all current test routes on their website.
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hezzlington
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#12
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I had to deviate from my 'test route' due to road works. I also went the wrong way during the independent part of my driving test, so that changed our route a bit. The important thing was that I remained calm (despite my examiner shouting at me for going the wrong way), and just carried on driving safely which is what they're assessing. Becoming familiar with a particularly challenging route or a route with bits to watch out for like 20 zones certainly won't do you any harm, you should be doing this with your instructor anyway, but memorizing a route to the point where it becomes so familiar you run the risk of getting complacent certainly could do you harm.
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username4565938
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#13
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An Instructors role is to teach to drive, not to pass a test on a particular test route. Anyone who teaches test routes would lose their job on a Standards Check, this is not an ADI's role. An ADI will teach you all the skills you require to take a driving test at any centre throughout the UK. If you feel you need to learn test routes, this is making a poor driver and when you get out in the real world on your own are at a high risk of having an accident.
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krist0ph3r
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All valid points above, but I can attest to the fact that test routes are known and definitely used by ADIs. I just passed my driving test last week, and the last 3 weeks were spent driving on the test routes. There were 5 routes, with 3 minor variations of each that I practiced.

As for why it's good to know these routes: there are certain things that can catch you off guard if you don't practice them. For example, one of the routes has an uphill start on a curved parking bay. My instructor specifically took me there, because I couldn't see oncoming vehicles in my rearview and had to check my wing mirror. There's a bus stop and a gate on the curve. I had to make sure I park in the perfect spot, start on the hill, and pull out quickly as a vehicle could catch up quickly thanks to limited visibility in my mirrors. That's a good thing to include in both the test and when learning!

Similarly, there's a junction on one of the routes where the lane arrows are not painted far enough on the road. I could see most drivers cut lanes at the last minute, but while being assessed that would be considered unsafe behaviour.

As for the routes being published, it's probably not legal to publish them as "test routes", but if they were called "practice routes" I'm sure that'll fly
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username4565938
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#15
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(Original post by krist0ph3r)
All valid points above, but I can attest to the fact that test routes are known and definitely used by ADIs. I just passed my driving test last week, and the last 3 weeks were spent driving on the test routes. There were 5 routes, with 3 minor variations of each that I practiced.

As for why it's good to know these routes: there are certain things that can catch you off guard if you don't practice them. For example, one of the routes has an uphill start on a curved parking bay. My instructor specifically took me there, because I couldn't see oncoming vehicles in my rearview and had to check my wing mirror. There's a bus stop and a gate on the curve. I had to make sure I park in the perfect spot, start on the hill, and pull out quickly as a vehicle could catch up quickly thanks to limited visibility in my mirrors. That's a good thing to include in both the test and when learning!

Similarly, there's a junction on one of the routes where the lane arrows are not painted far enough on the road. I could see most drivers cut lanes at the last minute, but while being assessed that would be considered unsafe behaviour.

As for the routes being published, it's probably not legal to publish them as "test routes", but if they were called "practice routes" I'm sure that'll fly
Unfortunately you was trained to get around a test route. Sorry to hear that. Good luck with your driving career.
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krist0ph3r
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#16
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#16
it's impossible to simply memorize 15 routes of 45 minutes each, unless you have an eidetic memory. it's simply that test routes are planned to test you, and so it's good to practice these.

ps: I'm currently training for my motorcycle license, and they aren't doing the test routes as part of the training. it's also in a different city, about an hour away. I've been able to get there without faults just by being instructed over radio, so it does seem like my car training has worked for me!
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soviolin
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#17
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#17
How did you find the routes near your test centre? I've googled and am struggling... I've just had my Test changed and now have to take it at a completely different test centre (!!). I'd really like to have a vague idea of the routes near the new test centre if possible! Just so I can be aware of any oddities nearby, since I'm completely unfamiliar with the area and won't have any lessons there before the test which is next Tuesday 18 Feb. ! The new test location is Llantrisant, Wales.
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Don L Gates
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#18
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#18
(Original post by Dez)
First off because fixed test routes don't technically exist, an examiner can adjust routes on-the-fly if needed (e.g. to avoid traffic or roadworks). Second, because test routes are pretty closely guarded information at the DVSA and they also change quite frequently. Third, because the practical driving test just had a major overhaul with the sat nav thing, so there's no chance all the test routes for every test centre in the UK is actually known when the new test has only been in operation for a few months.

Test routes are completely worthless information anyway. What is the point in memorising all 100+ potential routes a test centre can give you? None whatsoever. Improve your driving skill instead and you'll be able to drive on any road the examiner sends you down, regardless of whether it's on a fixed route or not. Don't waste your time trying to game the system.
This is sound sensible advice and everything Dez says is correct. How do I know? Because I have worked as driving examiner for 25 years!
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Don L Gates
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#19
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#19
(Original post by krist0ph3r)
Similarly, there's a junction on one of the routes where the lane arrows are not painted far enough on the road. I could see most drivers cut lanes at the last minute, but while being assessed that would be considered unsafe behaviour.
In a situation such as this, where road markings are not clearly visible, it would be unfair to expect a learner driver to make a last second change of lanes and the examiner would actually give guidance.
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