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    (Original post by JohanGRK)
    I took a look at both the link you provided and LSE's exchange programmes, and it seems that universities in general seem more willing to exchange postgrads and research students than undergrads... Even though this may be due to LSE and Imperial being very research oriented and having a high proportion of postgraduate students in general.
    There's not a set curriculum to research like there is with taught programmes.

    It must be a nightmare trying to find different universities in different countries that roughly match your curriculum and that would be willing to work for you.
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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    There's not a set curriculum to research like there is with taught programmes.

    It must be a nightmare trying to find different universities in different countries that roughly match your curriculum and that would be willing to work for you.
    Apparently, that's not an issue - the LSE programmes at least are additional to your degree (you still have to come back and finish off your last year of studies in London, and you pay tuition fees as normal during the year abroad). Dunno how Imperial works - I'm guessing that theirs is integrated into the degree?
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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    Not exactly bro.

    You can change to a different programme within the two years once you're there without a fuss.

    You don't have to apply for a year abroad in the first instance
    Thanks. I should stop looking at this kinda stuff because I wont get in anyways hahaha.
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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    Do you know if they got put in the same year, or in the year above?
    same year, the only ones that struggled were law students.... they had to do law school and its only taught at post grad level in the US. Besides US law is so complicated....every state varies there is no consensus and if your not from that state you really struggle alot of times understanding the moral/sense of it.

    Im american and i dont even get some of the things they used to do in the next state over, i would be like thats illegal there? lol.
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    (Original post by JohanGRK)
    Apparently, that's not an issue - the LSE programmes at least are additional to your degree (you still have to come back and finish off your last year of studies in London, and you pay tuition fees as normal during the year abroad). Dunno how Imperial works - I'm guessing that theirs is integrated into the degree?
    It is for European univerisites because of the ECTS.

    I'm not fully aware of American universities, but some of the programmes are Master's and retain 4 years in length as opposed to 5, so I imagine they are too.
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    (Original post by Realitysreflexx)
    same year, the only ones that struggled were law students.... they had to do law school and its only taught at post grad level in the US. Besides US law is so complicated....every state varies there is no consensus and if your not from that state you really struggle alot of times understanding the moral/sense of it.

    Im american and i dont even get some of the things they used to do in the next state over, i would be like thats illegal there? lol.
    That explains it, I know UCL puts students in the year above so they don't cruise through it easily.

    Also, that's a bit stupid, how are you gonna put undergrads on to a graduate degree in law smh - must've been so awkward with young 20-something's in a lecture hall with people approaching 30. Do they even learn UK Law as a result?
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    (Original post by Rohan77642)
    Thanks. I should stop looking at this kinda stuff because I wont get in anyways hahaha.
    Gotta have hope
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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    That explains it, I know UCL puts students in the year above so they don't cruise through it easily.

    Also, that's a bit stupid, how are you gonna put undergrads on to a graduate degree in law smh - must've been so awkward with young 20-something's in a lecture hall with people approaching 30. Do they even learn UK Law as a result?
    There is a law degree at Nottingham with a focus on US law as a specilisation its pretty unique or so it sounds. I guess thats the only option im not sure if it counts or not toward the degree. I think its just to give them a taste and prepare them in case they do want to practice us law they would have a nice advantage to do so.
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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    Gotta have hope
    Yeah lol.
    Pretty cool that they have introduced this. Makes me wanna go to imperial even more .
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    (Original post by Rohan77642)
    Yeah lol.
    Pretty cool that they have introduced this. Makes me wanna go to imperial even more .
    No doubt an 80% average is gonna be required.

    Whenever an even mildly prestigious US university is available for exchange, everyone applies for it and you often need a good first to get accepted.
 
 
 
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