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Belgium tries to undermine the internet - national security threat? watch

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    Our Belgian "allies" are trying to undermine the economy of the internet. Most people would be astounded to learn just how entrenched Facebook is into the world wide web. This is an attack not just on Anglo-American tech, but on the internet as a whole.

    In another blow for technology, judges in Belgium have once again ruled that the company broke privacy laws by deploying technology such as cookies and social plug-ins on other websites to track users and non-users alike across the web.

    Facebook faces fines of up to €100 million, at a rate of €250,000 per day, if it fails to comply with the court ruling to stop tracking Belgians’ web browsing habits. It must also destroy any illegally obtained data, the court said.

    Facebook said it will appeal.

    “The cookies and pixels we use are industry standard technologies and enable hundreds of thousands of businesses to grow their businesses and reach customers across the EU,” it said. It added that, while it does not offer an opt-out of the data collection, it does offer people the chance to opt-out of that data being used for ads.

    The privacy lawsuit dates back to 2015 when the Belgium privacy watchdog brought a civil suit against Facebook for its near invisible tracking of non-users via social plug-ins and the like. This followed an investigation by the agency that culminated in a highly critical report touching on many areas of Facebook’s data handling practices.

    “Facebook collects information about us all when we surf the Internet,” explains the Belgian privacy watchdog. Their report found that Facebook had placed tracking scripts on over 10,000 other sites.

    “Facebook uses various technologies, such as the famous ‘cookies’ or the ‘social plug-ins’ (for example, the ‘Like’ or ‘Share’ buttons) [that track you even if you don't touch them] or tracking ‘pixels’ that are invisible to the naked eye. It uses them on its own website but also and especially on the websites of third parties."

    Facebook combines the information it collects to create shadow profiles of non-users, which often also contain information collected by contacts who do use Facebook (such as your phone number if a friend has the Facebook app installed on their phone).

    As usual, Facebook first tried to argue the Belgian DPA had no jurisdiction over its European business, which is headquartered in Ireland. But local judges disagreed.

    Subsequently, Belgian courts have twice ruled that Facebook’s use of cookies violates European privacy laws. If Facebook keeps appealing, the case could end up going all the way to Europe’s supreme court, the CJEU.

    Facebook will face a similar complaint in a lawsuit in Austria, filed by privacy campaigner and law student Max Schrems (owner of the site https://www.europe-v-facebook.org, which should tell you exactly what his agenda is).

    Thankfully the fines are so small that Facebook can just ignore the silly privacy laws and carry on making the world a better place. But the fact that Europe is increasingly concerned with privacy should concern us. Our counter-terrorism program in Europe relies on even larger scale surveillance - are the Europeans going to ban that too?!

    https://techcrunch.com/2018/02/19/fa...gal-again/amp/
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    You're going to have to indulge me here - how exactly is Belgium standing up for its citizens rights (literally its raison detre] an attack on the the internet proper? People have a right not to be spied on for Facebooks profit.
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    (Original post by Napp)
    You're going to have to indulge me here - how exactly is Belgium standing up for its citizens rights (literally its raison detre] an attack on the the internet proper? People have a right not to be spied on for Facebooks profit.
    The internet relies on ads.

    Facebook - humanity's crowning glory, bringing all humans around the world closer together - relies on ads.

    All your favourite websites. News, email, search engines, you name it.

    Even sites that don't run ads do rely on services from ad giants such as Google and Amazon.

    Taking the ads away would destroy the free (as in free beer) internet.

    If people don't want to be spied on by the ad giants, they shouldn't use the internet.
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    (Original post by AngeryPenguin)
    Facebook - humanity's crowning glory,

    ...

    If people don't want to be spied on by the ad giants, they shouldn't use the internet.

    Alright we're done here
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    (Original post by AngeryPenguin)
    The internet relies on ads.

    Facebook - humanity's crowning glory, bringing all humans around the world closer together - relies on ads.

    All your favourite websites. News, email, search engines, you name it.

    Even sites that don't run ads do rely on services from ad giants such as Google and Amazon.

    Taking the ads away would destroy the free (as in free beer) internet.

    If people don't want to be spied on by the ad giants, they shouldn't use the internet.
    Facebook is the crowning glory is it? 😂
    As for your last comment about not using the internet all I say is that that's a ridiculously stupid thing to say.
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