Turn on thread page Beta

Do you think prisons should be punishment or rehabilitation? watch

    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ninja Squirrel)
    If you compare the prisons in America to those in Norway or Denmark you see a very different type of setting. Prisons in America are hellish and some people believe this actually causes more violence and mental health problems because in maximum security the inmates have nothing to do and it's very cramped.

    Whereas in Denmark or Norway for example the prisons are like holiday camps and while this may be criticised by a lot of people statistics show that the majority of inmates in Americas prisons will re-offend but those in Norway or Denmark are much less likely to re-offend so it would seem the more laid back approach actually helps prevent re-offending once they get released.

    What do you think?
    Prison should punish by taking away a persons liberty but go no further than that.

    Every effort should be made to rehabilitate the captive prison population whilst you have total control over them.

    That’s giving them skills, counselling, life coaching, rehab.

    In my opinion we should also give them a job to go to when they leave using the skills they have learnt such as a brick layer etc.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mojojojo101)
    American prisoners do more than menial jobs, they produce thousands of tonnes of military equipment, parts for the automobile, food and textile industries.

    You can't see how it may be a conflict of interest for a government (or even worse a private corporation) to be financially benefiting from prisoners?
    I consider assembly line work as a menial job.

    Yes, prison labour can cause problems, but it doesn't have to cause problems. If a government is merely making enough money that the prison system at best breaks even, then what is there to gain from more prisoners?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dheorl)
    Considering the number of criminals that are reoffenders, I would have said one of the most effective ways of reducing crime is to switch up the prison system...
    Do you actually know the reoffending rates of both countries. I'm willing to make a strong bet the answer is no...largely because you wouldn't be making such a comment if you did.

    Norway has one of the lowest reoffending rates in the world with 20%.

    The UK, however, is really not that far off. We have a reoffending rate of just 25.6%, which is pretty excellent given our circumstances that I outlined above. Why change a system which is already pretty good?

    Compare it to the US system, which is awful, at a 76%+ reoffending rate, and suddenly you become more appriciative.

    Sources:

    http://uk.businessinsider.com/why-no...essful-2014-12

    https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&so...ORvuds09q66NjC
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HighOnGoofballs)
    Do you actually know the reoffending rates of both countries. I'm willing to make a strong bet the answer is no...largely because you wouldn't be making such a comment if you did.

    Norway has one of the lowest reoffending rates in the world with 20%.

    The UK, however, is really not that far off. We have a reoffending rate of just 25.6%, which is pretty excellent given our circumstances that I outlined above. Why change a system which is already pretty good?

    Compare it to the US system, which is awful, at a 76%+ reoffending rate, and suddenly you become more appriciative.

    Sources:

    http://uk.businessinsider.com/why-no...essful-2014-12

    https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&so...ORvuds09q66NjC
    You're right, reducing the re-offending rate by 20% is completely worthless and shouldn't even be considered :rolleyes:
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dheorl)
    You're right, reducing the re-offending rate by 20% is completely worthless and shouldn't even be considered :rolleyes:
    You're right, let's spend billions to reduce the rate down to 20, rather than spending more money in education which will help more people, or spending more money on reducing poverty, which will help people. Ya got me, really making a convincing argument for rehabilitation here, which is vastly more expensive than punishment and benefits a limited number of people.

    Urg, hate it when people can't admit there just wrong about certain things. Why must you double down when I've not only provided you evidence the current system is good, but also given you better alternatives, both of which you have failed to counter, yet you're still adamant on a pre-concieved notion backed up by nothing.

    /rant.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dheorl)
    I consider assembly line work as a menial job.

    Yes, prison labour can cause problems, but it doesn't have to cause problems. If a government is merely making enough money that the prison system at best breaks even, then what is there to gain from more prisoners?
    You'd have to protect any value coming out of the prison system, so it could only be used to cover costs, even then it would take a huge burden off the national budget if prisons were self sufficient. The conflict of interest would still remain that more prisoners = more cash to play with.

    Assuming the system could work as an insulated, publicly owned non-profit though it would still be unnaceptable to me to expect prisoners to work without the full legal protections available to normal workers like sick pay, holiday pay, the right to unionise and there must be no compulsion or incentive to work wrt time served then I think it might be viable... that is hardly a realistic proposition though is it...
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HighOnGoofballs)
    You're right, let's spend billions to reduce the rate down to 20, rather than spending more money in education which will help more people, or spending more money on reducing poverty, which will help people. Ya got me, really making a convincing argument for rehabilitation here, which is vastly more expensive than punishment and benefits a limited number of people.

    Urg, hate it when people can't admit there just wrong about certain things. Why must you double down when I've not only provided you evidence the current system is good, but also given you better alternatives, both of which you have failed to counter, yet you're still adamant on a pre-concieved notion backed up by nothing.

    /rant.
    Provided evidence that you seemingly haven't actually read, but don't let that stop you ranting.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mojojojo101)
    You'd have to protect any value coming out of the prison system, so it could only be used to cover costs, even then it would take a huge burden off the national budget if prisons were self sufficient. The conflict of interest would still remain that more prisoners = more cash to play with.

    Assuming the system could work as an insulated, publicly owned non-profit though it would still be unnaceptable to me to expect prisoners to work without the full legal protections available to normal workers like sick pay, holiday pay, the right to unionise and there must be no compulsion or incentive to work wrt time served then I think it might be viable... that is hardly a realistic proposition though is it...
    I agree that there should be sick pay etc, and if they flatly refuse to work then you obviously can't physically force someone to be productive, but I personally have no moral issue with making things considerably less comfortable for those who won't, assuming of course as you say it's a sealed system where profits are capped to pay for the prisons.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I've just been released from Police investigation, I've spent the last 3 months - up until just a few days ago - preparing for the worst, a prison sentence. I must have watched every single video appertaining to the UK prison system that I could find, there was a pretty good one by Ross Kemp, a documentary. it really portrays the reality of prison life. Luckily, I got off the hook after the CPS decided there was insufficient evidence to charge. Prison really is hell, you can't be yourself, you're constantly at risk of getting beaten down by crims, or accumulating debt for drugs, it is the worst thing imaginable. I would never have made it.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Prisons should serve the following purposes:

    1. Separate dangerous or antisocial people from society.
    2. Give convicted criminals time to think about what they did, learn from their wrongdoings, and come out better people.
    3. Be a deterrent to potential offenders.

    Prisons should therefore be places that aim to rehabilitate offenders, but shouldn't be something to look forward to. It's also important to remember we aren't imprisoning people to take revenge on them. That's not the point. Justice means doing right, and wanting a person to suffer - with no desire to fix them - is not doing right.
 
 
 
Poll
Is the Big Bang theory correct?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.