Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    What three subjects should I pick that will be very well suited towards an economics degree. I don't want to reveal what subjects I enjoy and I am good at as I just want to know what are the best combinations to do an economics degree.

    Thanks
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Maths (Take Statistics as your module) and economics. The rest is down to you, though I'd say do something like further maths or politics.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anushan13)
    What three subjects should I pick that will be very well suited towards an economics degree. I don't want to reveal what subjects I enjoy and I am good at as I just want to know what are the best combinations to do an economics degree.

    Thanks
    The first question you should be asking yourself is if you're good at maths.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Glassapple)
    The first question you should be asking yourself is if you're good at maths.
    Yes, maths is the one subject I'm certain I'll pick
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jsk800)
    Maths (Take Statistics as your module) and economics. The rest is down to you, though I'd say do something like further maths or politics.
    They don't offer politics at my sixth form. And I'm not too keen on further maths. How would geography and history be and which one of those is better?
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    There are some universities that offer economic history degrees etc. but quite frankly as essay subjects the skills you'd develop from either wouldn't be entirely transferrable. Out of the two I'd recommend history if there's source work in it because you can say a brief line on how it improved your analytical skills in your personal statement. If you do maths and economics business studies would be made very easy, you could do an AS in it and then take either History as a full A level or vice versa. Most people don't like the idea of doing both (neither did I which is why I didn't pick business) but I regret it as it shows you have an understanding of the inner workings of economic policy in a business setting and keeps your options open to other finance careers. In addition when you're applying for work shadowing/placement business would look great along with economics and maths so you'd have a good chance of getting in with PwC or Deloitte for a few days. Good luck with your choices I hope they work out!
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Yet again, Economics and Maths sound good.
    If you're not keen on Further Maths, what about Physics?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anushan13)
    What three subjects should I pick that will be very well suited towards an economics degree. I don't want to reveal what subjects I enjoy and I am good at as I just want to know what are the best combinations to do an economics degree.

    Thanks
    Have you checked the entry requirements of universities to which you might like to apply?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thewrongofsummer)
    Yet again, Economics and Maths sound good.
    If you're not keen on Further Maths, what about Physics?
    I'm not really a fan of the sciences so physics would be a no too.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ageshallnot)
    Have you checked the entry requirements of universities to which you might like to apply?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I have and I'm pretty confident of achieving As and A*s in my A levels.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gibsonlp59)
    There are some universities that offer economic history degrees etc. but quite frankly as essay subjects the skills you'd develop from either wouldn't be entirely transferrable. Out of the two I'd recommend history if there's source work in it because you can say a brief line on how it improved your analytical skills in your personal statement. If you do maths and economics business studies would be made very easy, you could do an AS in it and then take either History as a full A level or vice versa. Most people don't like the idea of doing both (neither did I which is why I didn't pick business) but I regret it as it shows you have an understanding of the inner workings of economic policy in a business setting and keeps your options open to other finance careers. In addition when you're applying for work shadowing/placement business would look great along with economics and maths so you'd have a good chance of getting in with PwC or Deloitte for a few days. Good luck with your choices I hope they work out!
    Yh, I too am reluctant to do both economics and business studies and I also read that business studies isn't valued by unis.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Currently in year 13 applied for eco in January. Maths is absolutely necessary, no discussion about that. Now if you want to go to the top top unis further maths would be nice too. For example if you don't do at least AS further maths there is 99% chance you will get rejected by LSE and then to be fair the 3rd subject should be something you enjoy. Believe it or not lots of people do economics degrees without a level economics. As for me, I do A2 maths, physics, economics and Greek (first language) and AS further maths and finance.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anushan13)
    I have and I'm pretty confident of achieving As and A*s in my A levels.
    I meant their subject requirements/preferences.

    For example, LSE would dislike a combination of Maths, Further Maths and any one other subject.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    you don't need a level maths to do economic degree. Nottingham top uni does not require it
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Top economics degrees in the UK pretty much all require A-Level Maths (often at A*/A grade) and the very best often ask for A-Level Further Maths (e.g. Cambridge, LSE, UCL, Warwick etc). My advice to anyone who wants to study economics at degree level would be to take Maths and Further Maths. Aside from those, any subjects will be fine to be honest. For example, economics degrees frequently require you to be adept at essay-writing and so subjects such as Economics, History, Politics, English Literature etc. will be fine. In addition, economics increasingly draws on areas of applied mathematics and subjects which use mathematics intensively; therefore, taking subjects such as Physics and Chemistry (and perhaps also Biology) will also be very helpful. Also, languages are equally good, and perhaps increasingly useful especially for the job market later in life. Basically, my advice would be that if you are set on studying economics at university, take Maths and Further Maths plus whatever combination of one or two more subjects that interest you. This does not have to be economics as all courses will assume no knowledge of economics; however, this may be helpful for giving you a head-start in some courses. However, it is worth noting that almost all top economics degrees will assume a fundamental knowledge of pure mathematics.
 
 
 

2,878

students online now

800,000+

Exam discussions

Find your exam discussion here

Poll
Should predicted grades be removed from the uni application process
Help with your A-levels

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Rosette

Essay expert

Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

Uni match

Uni match

Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

Study planner

Create a study plan

Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

Study planner

Resources by subject

Everything from mind maps to class notes.

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student doing homework

Study tips from A* students

Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

Study help links and info

Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.