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    I told my parents I thought I was depressed when I was 13 years old. By that time I was already in a bad place and didn't know how to deal with it on my own. When I told them, they shouted at me, saying I had nothing to be depressed for, that I had always been given everything I wanted. Is this a normal reaction? And how do I deal with this on my own?
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    Normal in the sense of standard from someone who doesn't understand depression. Have you been to see your GP or is there a councillor you can talk to?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I told my parents I thought I was depressed when I was 13 years old. By that time I was already in a bad place and didn't know how to deal with it on my own. When I told them, they shouted at me, saying I had nothing to be depressed for, that I had always been given everything I wanted. Is this a normal reaction? And how do I deal with this on my own?
    Go to GP to get them to refer you to a psychiatrist and psychologist so they decide whether therphy or medicine is the way to go for you.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I told my parents I thought I was depressed when I was 13 years old. By that time I was already in a bad place and didn't know how to deal with it on my own. When I told them, they shouted at me, saying I had nothing to be depressed for, that I had always been given everything I wanted. Is this a normal reaction? And how do I deal with this on my own?
    Unfortunately a lot of people don't understand depression well so you can get negative reactions like that. In reality you don't need a reason to be depresses. In fact that's kinda the point of depression- you feel bad for no real reason or out of proportion to any reason.
    Even with your parents being less than understanding, you don't have to go through this alone. Make an appointment with your GP and tell them how you're feeling. It often helps to write things down to remind you or so you can pass it to them if you find it a bit hard to get the words out.
    They can give you advice and help set you up with some support.
    Another good place to get support is through school. They'll have access to a counselling service for students which you can use.

    Oh and don't totally give up with your parents. They often come around once they understand things better so you may well find they become less difficult if you give them a little info or just in time.

    Hope that helps
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I told my parents I thought I was depressed when I was 13 years old. By that time I was already in a bad place and didn't know how to deal with it on my own. When I told them, they shouted at me, saying I had nothing to be depressed for, that I had always been given everything I wanted. Is this a normal reaction? And how do I deal with this on my own?
    I had clinical depression at 18. To help treat the condition I initially exercised weekly (jogging and weight training). That helped initially, but over time the positive mood effect wore down. I then went on anti-depressants through my GP (Sertraline worked for me), and they worked reasonably well until I developed tolerance to them after 3 months, but taking them was better than not taking them.

    I then went a bit more radical. I started wearing a nicotine patch, starting at 14mg, then after a week moving to 21mg, and the following week going to 25mg. They worked great for a few weeks, but over time I developed tolerance to the patches, even though I didn't wear them when sleeping, and I only wore them 5 days a week.

    I then went to Nicotine lozenges at 4mg dosage (powerful stuff), taking one pill no more than 3-4 times a day. They seemed to help on top of the exercise and anti-depressants. So whilst I am not cured from depression, I can say that I manage it quite effectively my way, and I can also live a near normal life.

    Having a good social life with a good set of friends is also important. Don't bother with toxic people!
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    They wont understand. Just try and make yourself happy
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I told my parents I thought I was depressed when I was 13 years old. By that time I was already in a bad place and didn't know how to deal with it on my own. When I told them, they shouted at me, saying I had nothing to be depressed for, that I had always been given everything I wanted. Is this a normal reaction? And how do I deal with this on my own?
    I have been depressed for over the year I had the same reaction from some many people telling me I was ungrateful and so many people have it worse but so many have it better as well.Depression is hard to treat and won't go away on its own it usually tends to come back in my opinion and so do many mental illnesses.It is just like a physical illness.Treating mental illness using medicine is quick as the waiting list for a psychiatrist is couple weeks while for a psychologist it is couple months but they don't really like prescribing medicine for under 18s from my experience and will only offer therapy which takes a long time to start as the waiting list is ridiculous.
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    I started having symptoms of depression 6 years ago. Nobody ever wanted to help me, they just wanted me to smile and cheer up. I'm going to the GP to get help in 3 weeks. I wish I'd gone sooner but no one ever supported me getting help.
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    Most people are not educated about mental health, so they dont really believe or know how to react about certain things. A lot of people may get the meaning of depressed wrong and may think you're being selfish and ungrateful; but thats not the case, its because they dont understand how depression (or other mental problems) work.

    My suggestion would be to go to your GP if you can. If not, talk to a counsellor or to a close friend.
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    Yeah, I feel you, there just arent enough people out their who properly understand mental health issues and how to deal with them properly, the solution to this is just by trying to talk to others who are also depressed and share your thoughts and feelings with them
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    It sounds like your parents took it defensively because they've been working hard to give you the best life they can. But depression isn't their fault, nor your fault, and they clearly don't understand mental illness if they think you need a specific reason to be depressed. You've done the right thing by seeking out help. I agree with the other replies that your doctor would be the best place to go for support at this time. Also, he/she may be able to explain to your parents (with your permission) how they can be supportive at this time. Best of luck!
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    If you have a hormonal imbalance then it has nothing to do with being being 'given everything' you want. I'd recommend seeing your GP, they might decide to put you on meds or for you to see a therapist
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