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    I'm not currently at university, but after reading through random pages on TSR about students who had dropped out of uni for different reasons, I'm curious about peoples personal experiences about dropping out? Was university life boring? Was your course not suited to you?

    I've been on a gap year since leaving school in 2017, (Which I have loved every moment of it) I'm looking for a university course or, preferably, a degree apprenticeship. I've been finding it difficult to commit to a university course after seeing some of my friends drop out for different reasons and I would hate to waste a few months in a course and a university that I could end up hating.

    Feel free to post below
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    (Original post by JakeSimm)
    I'm not currently at university, but after reading through random pages on TSR about students who had dropped out of uni for different reasons, I'm curious about peoples personal experiences about dropping out? Was university life boring? Was your course not suited to you?

    I've been on a gap year since leaving school in 2017, (Which I have loved every moment of it) I'm looking for a university course or, preferably, a degree apprenticeship. I've been finding it difficult to commit to a university course after seeing some of my friends drop out for different reasons and I would hate to waste a few months in a course and a university that I could end up hating.

    Feel free to post below
    Dont go until you know which course and which uni. Student finance us inly once.

    Reasons ive seen

    1. Wrong course or hated course.
    2. Wrong uni.
    3. Loneliness, made no fiends and miserable.
    4. Failed exams.
    5. Withdrawn/ kicked out.
    6. Mental health issues caused by uni. Anxiety, depression. Pre existing ones and sometimes much more serious.
    7. Break up or relationship issues. Pregnancy etc.
    8. Family issues
    9. Change of career.
    10. Money issues.

    Off the top of my head.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Dont go until you know which course and which uni. Student finance us inly once.

    Reasons ive seen

    1. Wrong course or hated course.
    2. Wrong uni.
    3. Loneliness, made no fiends and miserable.
    4. Failed exams.
    5. Withdrawn/ kicked out.
    6. Mental health issues caused by uni. Anxiety, depression. Pre existing ones and sometimes much more serious.
    7. Break up or relationship issues. Pregnancy etc.
    8. Family issues
    9. Change of career.
    10. Money issues.

    Off the top of my head.
    Do you think you would have to be 'mentally strong' to actually be able to cope with uni? I.e, if a person had anxiety or depression for example, would they struggle much more?

    What reasons could there be to not making that many mates at uni?
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    (Original post by JakeSimm)
    be

    Do you think you would have to be 'mentally strong' to actually be able to cope with uni? I.e, if a person had anxiety or depression for example, would they struggle much more?

    What reasons could there be to not making that many mates at uni?
    Some people are more prone to it. Some people develop it when they get there. Some people have big expectation or dont realise they adopt behaviours like staying in there room or dont socialise, which ends up in them making fewer friends. I think first term is important as it cliques off.

    I would also add sometimes its very hit and miss with flatmates and getting a nightmare mix can be really difficult.

    I would say be prepared , develop social skills and dnt go with mh issues. better to be well and confident. Some people have had all that time to think about it but they havent really and its a surprise they live away from home.


    Poor social skills
    Unlucky
    Not making an effort.
    Lack of confidence.
    Anti social.
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    (Original post by JakeSimm)
    I'm not currently at university, but after reading through random pages on TSR about students who had dropped out of uni for different reasons, I'm curious about peoples personal experiences about dropping out? Was university life boring? Was your course not suited to you?

    I've been on a gap year since leaving school in 2017, (Which I have loved every moment of it) I'm looking for a university course or, preferably, a degree apprenticeship. I've been finding it difficult to commit to a university course after seeing some of my friends drop out for different reasons and I would hate to waste a few months in a course and a university that I could end up hating.

    Feel free to post below
    I didn't drop out but to add to 999tiggers excellent list I would add not liking the lack of structure. For most people except maybe engineers and health care students uni isn't like school- you don't have timetabled sessions every hour from 9-4. You have between 10-25 hours contact time a week in first year which leaves time when you can determine what to do with that time. Some people like myself loved it, others found it difficult without someone standing over them telling them what to do with most of their time.
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    That's what I've wondered about, how do first years fill the time that they have free, excluding getting shitfaced?
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    (Original post by JakeSimm)
    That's what I've wondered about, how do first years fill the time that they have free, excluding getting shitfaced?
    I think first year is a great time to find the routine and hobbies and so on that you can use to build that resilience that people require when it comes to second and third year--because resilience is what you need to maintain your mental health.

    The first priority is a study routine--yes, first year doesn't "count," but this is the perfect time to figure out what works for you with a new grading system and new academic challenges. Then leftover time should go to finding those new hobbies--you have an Uni the opportunity to explore new sports or societies that you may not have had the chance to do previously.
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    (Original post by Michelle Bieger)
    I think first year is a great time to find the routine and hobbies and so on that you can use to build that resilience that people require when it comes to second and third year--because resilience is what you need to maintain your mental health.

    The first priority is a study routine--yes, first year doesn't "count," but this is the perfect time to figure out what works for you with a new grading system and new academic challenges. Then leftover time should go to finding those new hobbies--you have an Uni the opportunity to explore new sports or societies that you may not have had the chance to do previously.
    So the first year is really just a year to be able to get drunk a lot? If the first year doesn't "count", is it just the routine you work on the first year that would be beneficial to you in the second year? Or are there other substantial things?
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    (Original post by JakeSimm)
    So the first year is really just a year to be able to get drunk a lot? If the first year doesn't "count", is it just the routine you work on the first year that would be beneficial to you in the second year? Or are there other substantial things?
    Hahaha I don't think that's what first year is for

    I said it doesn't "count" (with the emphasis on the quotation marks), because first year is not usually used to calculate one's overall degree classification. However, first year grades are still included in one's transcript, so employers will still be able to see what you made and how much effort you put in.

    Yes--the routine you work on is most beneficial, in my opinion. People are tempted to just fob off first year because if you've taken A-levels, it can be "easy" as many first year modules are reviews and broadening of the A-level content (at least, this was the case for physics and maths). However, uni is very different from secondary education, so it can take people aback because it requires so much more independent study and research. If you spend the year building a great routine with good habits (eg. creating realistic uni study timetables, working out which study methods are best for your subject, etc.), then you can approach the much more difficult second and third years of uni with that routine and good habits and really smash it!

    As for the other substantial things--I think those are building hobbies and involvement within your Uni campus, like I mentioned in my original reply. A lot of loneliness, mental health stresses, and interpersonal relationship issues can be alleviated by ensuring you build yourself a home at Uni. If you build up a hobby, get involved in a Society or a sport, become a Student Rep, start volunteering locally--etc., etc.--you start meshing yourself in at Uni, and establishing your life outside of academia and work. You need that time away from work and study so that when it gets to the tough bits, the parts where you're in the library what seems like 24/7 and stressing, you can take a deep breath, do that hobby or society work or sport for a half hour, and then come back to do your work refreshed and energised.

    (As a bonus, all these things ensure you become a well-rounded individual with a more experienced CV.)

    I've seen the alternative--people who go home nearly every weekend, who don't pick up a hobby or sport or reason to be at the Uni besides the lecture--and it seems these are the people who have been most dissatisfied with their experience.
 
 
 

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