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    Can somebody plese grade this essay and give it a mark of out of 20. Thank you.

    Throughout an Inspector calls, Priestley emphasises the importance of collective responsibility. How does he do this?

    'We are members of one body. We are responsible for each other'. Throught the voice of the Inspector, Priestley conveys the fundamental message of his didactic play: collective responsibility or the concept fo everyone within a community being responsible for each other. I will explore how he conveys his message using structure, daramtic devices and decsriptive devices.

    The 'chain of events' that lead to Eva's suicide is one way in which he does this. The plot's structure of having one action being linked to the next presents a dominio effect of each family member's actions and suggests how closely we are linkes in a society and that we should care for ecah other. Alternatively, one could interpret the 'chain' the inspector refers to as being a metaphor showing the linked members within a comunity and reinforce the idea that everybody within a community are 'members of one body'. Therefore, through the descriptive dveice of metaphor and structure, he conveys the significance of collective responsibility.

    Moreover, Mr Birling - the Inspector's foil - who Priestley presents as a parsimonious capitalist - shown by him saying 'lower wages and higher prices: a capitalist ideolgy and as an individual who rejects collective responsibility as he dismisses community as 'nonsense' - is constantly presented as ignorant and blind to reality. Priestley carries the motif of sight throughout 'An Inspector Calls' which suggests the warped understanding of the superficial Birling family. When Mr Birling says 'I don't see', Priestley is conveying how blind they are to the truth and how they are unable to see reality in its real form. This is reinforced by Priestley setting the scene as if the Birling's dining room was being seen through'rose tinted glass' and not with clarity. By expressing capitalist views through a character such as Mr Birling - who the audience spectating post 1945 will find disagreeable through Priestley's use of dramatic irony when Mr Birling dismisses the possibility of World War and dubs the Titanic 'unsinakble' depsite the number of deaths accounted for due to these events - Priestley presents how it is an individual of ignorant nature and wrong understanding who would have capitalist views and emphasises the importance of collective responsibility. At the conclusion of the play, Mr Birling's capitalist ideology is due to sink like the Titanic and therefore the mention of the Titanic is almost a method of foreshadowing for the conclusion of the play. Moreover, this point is emphasised with the dramatic device of the 'sharp ringing' of the door bell interrupting Mr Birling as he narrates his capitalist ideolgy suggetsing how ridiculous and disagreebale the concpet is.

    'If men will not learn that lesson then they will be taught in fire and blood and anguish'. The polysyndeton of 'and' emphasises the myriad of ways one could be punished for rejecting collective responsibility. One could interpret the Inspector as using hell imagery to compare rejecting this concept to a sin punishable by being sent to Hell suggesting that religion and God wanted humanity to recognise collective responsibility as required on Earth. On the other hand, Priestley may be referring to the World Wards and Priestley is blaming political leaders rejecting responsibility in a community that led to countless deaths. Through the use of hell imagery, Priestley conveys the importance of collective responsibility.

    I feel that Priestley uses many devices to express the importance he places on collective responsibilty. The Inspector's final words within the play even link to the Old Testament suggesting how even religion - a vital concept in society at the time - recognises rejecting responsibilty within a community as a sin and reinforcing how much is it is needed to esnure that society is at its best.
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    this is really good but i'm not even good at english myself so i suggest you show your essay to one of your english teachers
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    This is really good! Great language, just done my mock for an inspector calls today good luck! High marks defiantly!
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    (Original post by Pravi29)
    Can somebody plese grade this essay and give it a mark of out of 20. Thank you.

    Throughout an Inspector calls, Priestley emphasises the importance of collective responsibility. How does he do this?

    'We are members of one body. We are responsible for each other'. Throught the voice of the Inspector, Priestley conveys the fundamental message of his didactic play: collective responsibility or the concept fo everyone within a community being responsible for each other. I will explore how he conveys his message using structure, daramtic devices and decsriptive devices.

    The 'chain of events' that lead to Eva's suicide is one way in which he does this. The plot's structure of having one action being linked to the next presents a dominio effect of each family member's actions and suggests how closely we are linkes in a society and that we should care for ecah other. Alternatively, one could interpret the 'chain' the inspector refers to as being a metaphor showing the linked members within a comunity and reinforce the idea that everybody within a community are 'members of one body'. Therefore, through the descriptive dveice of metaphor and structure, he conveys the significance of collective responsibility.

    Moreover, Mr Birling - the Inspector's foil - who Priestley presents as a parsimonious capitalist - shown by him saying 'lower wages and higher prices': a capitalist ideolgy and as an individual who rejects collective responsibility as he dismisses community as 'nonsense' - is constantly presented as ignorant and blind to reality. Priestley carries the motif of sight throughout 'An Inspector Calls' which suggests the warped understanding of the superficial Birling family. When Mr Birling says 'I don't see', Priestley is conveying how blind they are to the truth and how they are unable to see reality in its real form. This is reinforced by Priestley setting the scene as if the Birling's dining room was being seen through'rose tinted glass' and not with clarity. By expressing capitalist views through a character such as Mr Birling - who the audience spectating post 1945 will find disagreeable through Priestley's use of dramatic irony when Mr Birling dismisses the possibility of World War and dubs the Titanic 'unsinakble' depsite the number of deaths accounted for due to these events - Priestley presents how it is an individual of ignorant nature and wrong understanding who would have capitalist views and emphasises the importance of collective responsibility. At the conclusion of the play, Mr Birling's capitalist ideology is due to sink like the Titanic and therefore the mention of the Titanic is almost a method of foreshadowing for the conclusion of the play. Moreover, this point is emphasised with the dramatic device of the 'sharp ringing' of the door bell interrupting Mr Birling as he narrates his capitalist ideolgy suggetsing how ridiculous and disagreebale the concpet is.

    'If men will not learn that lesson then they will be taught in fire and blood and anguish'. The polysyndeton of 'and' emphasises the myriad of ways one could be punished for rejecting collective responsibility. One could interpret the Inspector as using hell imagery to compare rejecting this concept to a sin punishable by being sent to Hell suggesting that religion and God wanted humanity to recognise collective responsibility as required on Earth. On the other hand, Priestley may be referring to the World Wards and Priestley is blaming political leaders rejecting responsibility in a community that led to countless deaths. Through the use of hell imagery, Priestley conveys the importance of collective responsibility.

    I feel that Priestley uses many devices to express the importance he places on collective responsibilty. The Inspector's final words within the play even link to the Old Testament suggesting how even religion - a vital concept in society at the time - recognises rejecting responsibilty within a community as a sin and reinforcing how much is it is needed to esnure that society is at its best.
    I would advise looking through and finding typos/spelling mistakes
    I've put in bold the ones i can pick out! (just because you get about 4 SPaG marks and you shouldn't miss out on them because of spelling )
    overall very good, but i would advise you see if a teacher could mark it
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    Heya Just gonna annotate ur essay at a few places u could try improve it (sorry if i sound harsh, i'm just trying to help):

    'We are members of one body. We are responsible for each other'. I wouldn't start the essay with a quote, especially an important one you should be stating in your next paragraph. Throught the voice of the Inspector, Priestley conveys the fundamental message of his didactic play: collective responsibility or the concept fo everyone within a community being responsible for each other. I will explore how he conveys his message using structure, daramtic devices and decsriptive devices.You don't need to say "i will do xyz in my essay...". In the intro, you should give a very brief description of the ways in which Priestley does convey the need for collective responsibility (i.e. briefly answer the essay question). You did this well initially, saying "through the voice of the Inspector, Priestley conveys...", which the examiner will now know you will build upon later. Do this with other factors too; e.g. just mention a bit about Mr Birling in your intro and how he is used to promote responsibility, but don't go into too much depth as well!

    The 'chain of events' that lead to Eva's suicide is one way in which he does this. (This is a good example of using a point to begin with. All your main body paragraphs should begin with a point to show a "way in which he does" emphasise collective responsibility. Your 3rd paragraph doesn't really have this.) The plot's structure of having one action being linked to the next presents a dominio effect of each family member's actions and suggests how closely we are linkes in a society and that we should care for ecah other. Alternatively, one could interpret the 'chain' the inspector refers to as being a metaphor showing the linked members within a comunity and reinforce the idea that everybody within a community are 'members of one body'. Therefore, through the descriptive dveice of metaphor and structure, he conveys the significance of collective responsibility. You mention there is a metaphor and specific structure, but you don't explain the effect. You should go deeper into your analysis, for example: in the quote you said earlier ('We are members of one body. We are responsible for each other') the repetition (or if you wanna be fancy, anaphora in this case) of 'we' conveys the sense of mutual responsibility and togetherness that the Inspector wants to impart on the Birlings. And even better if you get the whole quote: "We don't live alone. We are members of one body. We are responsible for each other." - You could talk about the structure. The short, blunt sentences are presented so matter-of-factly by the Inspector that we take his words as a necessary truth rather than as his opinion (so he more successfully conveys the need of social responsibility!!).

    Moreover, Mr Birling - the Inspector's foil - who Priestley presents as a parsimonious (using fancy words is nice, but focus on making ur whole essay digestible and less clunky first) capitalist - shown by him saying 'lower wages and higher prices: a capitalist ideolgy and as an individual who rejects collective responsibility as he dismisses community as 'nonsense' - is constantly presented as ignorant and blind to reality (Clunky sentence - 4 dashes, 1 colon, 'and' 3 times, and about 5-7 clauses in one sentence!!!). Priestley carries the motif of sight throughout 'An Inspector Calls' which suggests the warped understanding of the superficial Birling family. When Mr Birling says 'I don't see' If you don't give the context or where in the play he says "I don't see", it's harder for the examiner to understand your point fully. So for example you could've said 'in response to the Inspector saying xyz, Birling says abcd...', Priestley is conveying how blind they are to the truth and how they are unable to see reality in its real form (Not a major point try improve the way you write, like 'reality in its real form' sounds a bit clunky!). This is reinforced by Priestley setting the scene as if the Birling's dining room was being seen through'rose tinted glass' and not with clarity. This is one of the more irrelevant quotes here. You didn't really say much about how it 'reinforces' it (except something about clarity). Either get rid of the quote or analyse it fully. You could say the rose-pink colour is quite soft, warm and comfortable, illustrating their relaxed/cosy lives which are shielded from the harsh realities of those others that are less fortunate in society. By expressing capitalist views through a character such as Mr Birling - who the audience spectating post 1945 will find disagreeable through Priestley's use of dramatic irony when Mr Birling dismisses the possibility of World War and dubs the Titanic 'unsinakble' depsite the number of deaths accounted for due to these events - Priestley presents how it is an individual of ignorant nature and wrong understanding who would have capitalist views and emphasises the importance of collective responsibility (quite a clunky sentence). At the conclusion of the play, Mr Birling's capitalist ideology is due to sink like the Titanic and therefore the mention of the Titanic is almost a method of foreshadowing for the conclusion of the play. Moreover, this point is emphasised with the dramatic device of the 'sharp ringing' of the door bell interrupting Mr Birling as he narrates his capitalist ideolgy suggetsing how ridiculous and disagreebale the concpet is. There are a lot of quotes flying around in this paragraph. I would say either split up the paragraph into 2 points and use the relevant quotes there, or just get rid of the irrelevant quotes that you can't talk a lot about. You merge everything about Mr Birling into this paragraph. Instead you could separate it like this: Have one paragraph showing the Inspector's role (which was your first main-body paragraph in ur essay, good!), then another paragraph showing how Mr Birling alone emphasises the need for collective responsibility. For this paragraph you would then include quotes that make him seem uncaring (find quotes) and ignorant (e.g. the titanic stuff) and show how this conveys the need for responsibility. After this, a third paragraph could be about the direct interaction between the Inspector and Mr Birling highlighting the need for responsibility: here you can talk about Birling being his foil, and include that "I don't see" quote in response to the Inspector, or any other confrontation between these two men that is relevant. This would break this paragraph up nicely and make the quotes less out of place and awkwardly placed.

    'If men will not learn that lesson then they will be taught in fire and blood and anguish'. I generally wouldn't just start a paragraph with a quote and its analysis. You need a point first (which addresses the essay title), and the quote should be evidence for this point, and then you analyse that evidence. For example the point here could be something alone the lines of the Inspector becoming intense and aggressive when he preaches the main message of the play (that they must learn social responsibility or suffer the consequences), in a last-ditch attempt to show the Birlings the right path. After saying this, you then should talk about the hellish imagery (which u did pretty well), and you could even compare it to the Inspector's previous calm and composed tone shown in the rest of the play before now, and how this makes his current actions more powerful. The polysyndeton of 'and' emphasises the myriad of ways one could be punished for rejecting collective responsibility. One could interpret the Inspector as using hell imagery to compare rejecting this concept to a sin punishable by being sent to Hell suggesting that religion and God wanted humanity to recognise collective responsibility as required on Earth. On the other hand, Priestley may be referring to the World Wards and Priestley is blaming political leaders rejecting responsibility in a community that led to countless deaths. Through the use of hell imagery, Priestley conveys the importance of collective responsibility.

    I feel that Priestley uses many devices to express the importance he places on collective responsibilty. Devices are used, but it isn't really useful to just mention that they "use devices" to show something. This is a generic thing that loads of people can say in literally any essay on any book or play. You conclusion is supposed to summarise the points you made in your essay, (and maybe add an interesting insight after if you can). So here you should directly answer how he emphasises the importance of collective responsibility: for example 1. Priestley has the Inspector as the driving force of this idea. This is exemplified in his final speech to the Birlings (where half your quotes came from!). 2. You can mention your point about Mr Birling being the Inspector's foil and an undesirable character, and how he is an example of what the audience should avoid. 3. Something you could've talked about a bit in your essay which I think may have been good in showing the importance of collective responsibility would have been the effects of being irresponsible (the disastrous effects of irresponsibility thus highlight the need for collective responsibility). You could have talked about Eva, and the way the Inspector describes her. Quotes include: "she lies with a burnt-out inside on a slab", or "with no relatives to help her, few friends, lonely, half starved, she was feeling desperate", or literally any quote that shows Eva as a victim due to the Birling's lack of responsibility.. Additional points like this that actually address the question are good to have. The Inspector's final words within the play even link to the Old Testament suggesting how even religion - a vital concept in society at the time - recognises rejecting responsibilty within a community as a sin and reinforcing how much is it is needed to esnure that society is at its best. <--- I think there are more important things to talk about than religion, e.g. stuff i said earlier lol

    I'm not a marker so I can't really judge it out of 20. Saying that, I would give this around a 6/7 out of 9 on the 9-1 scale thing. Making the essay easy to read with better grammar and sentences would easily make it a 7, while giving better analysis and points to answer the question would get you to the A* region. Also remember i'm not a teacher, so don't take everything I say at face value!!! I am likely to be wrong in some areas too lol
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    (Original post by laurawatt)
    I would advise looking through and finding typos/spelling mistakes
    I've put in bold the ones i can pick out! (just because you get about 4 SPaG marks and you shouldn't miss out on them because of spelling )
    overall very good, but i would advise you see if a teacher could mark it
    Thanks!
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    (Original post by Pravi29)
    Can somebody plese grade this essay and give it a mark of out of 20. Thank you.

    Throughout an Inspector calls, Priestley emphasises the importance of collective responsibility. How does he do this?

    'We are members of one body. We are responsible for each other'. Throught the voice of the Inspector, Priestley conveys the fundamental message of his didactic play: collective responsibility or the concept fo everyone within a community being responsible for each other. I will explore how he conveys his message using structure, daramtic devices and decsriptive devices.

    The 'chain of events' that lead to Eva's suicide is one way in which he does this. The plot's structure of having one action being linked to the next presents a dominio effect of each family member's actions and suggests how closely we are linkes in a society and that we should care for ecah other. Alternatively, one could interpret the 'chain' the inspector refers to as being a metaphor showing the linked members within a comunity and reinforce the idea that everybody within a community are 'members of one body'. Therefore, through the descriptive dveice of metaphor and structure, he conveys the significance of collective responsibility.

    Moreover, Mr Birling - the Inspector's foil - who Priestley presents as a parsimonious capitalist - shown by him saying 'lower wages and higher prices: a capitalist ideolgy and as an individual who rejects collective responsibility as he dismisses community as 'nonsense' - is constantly presented as ignorant and blind to reality. Priestley carries the motif of sight throughout 'An Inspector Calls' which suggests the warped understanding of the superficial Birling family. When Mr Birling says 'I don't see', Priestley is conveying how blind they are to the truth and how they are unable to see reality in its real form. This is reinforced by Priestley setting the scene as if the Birling's dining room was being seen through'rose tinted glass' and not with clarity. By expressing capitalist views through a character such as Mr Birling - who the audience spectating post 1945 will find disagreeable through Priestley's use of dramatic irony when Mr Birling dismisses the possibility of World War and dubs the Titanic 'unsinakble' depsite the number of deaths accounted for due to these events - Priestley presents how it is an individual of ignorant nature and wrong understanding who would have capitalist views and emphasises the importance of collective responsibility. At the conclusion of the play, Mr Birling's capitalist ideology is due to sink like the Titanic and therefore the mention of the Titanic is almost a method of foreshadowing for the conclusion of the play. Moreover, this point is emphasised with the dramatic device of the 'sharp ringing' of the door bell interrupting Mr Birling as he narrates his capitalist ideolgy suggetsing how ridiculous and disagreebale the concpet is.

    'If men will not learn that lesson then they will be taught in fire and blood and anguish'. The polysyndeton of 'and' emphasises the myriad of ways one could be punished for rejecting collective responsibility. One could interpret the Inspector as using hell imagery to compare rejecting this concept to a sin punishable by being sent to Hell suggesting that religion and God wanted humanity to recognise collective responsibility as required on Earth. On the other hand, Priestley may be referring to the World Wards and Priestley is blaming political leaders rejecting responsibility in a community that led to countless deaths. Through the use of hell imagery, Priestley conveys the importance of collective responsibility.

    I feel that Priestley uses many devices to express the importance he places on collective responsibilty. The Inspector's final words within the play even link to the Old Testament suggesting how even religion - a vital concept in society at the time - recognises rejecting responsibilty within a community as a sin and reinforcing how much is it is needed to esnure that society is at its best.
    Hi there :wavey:
    I've moved your thread to the English study help forum where hopefully you'll get more answers In future, it's best to select the subject from the list here and create a thread in there instead :yep: If you want to see where threads belong, check out this thread
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    (Original post by NeedHelpHelpNeed)
    Heya Just gonna annotate ur essay at a few places u could try improve it (sorry if i sound harsh, i'm just trying to help):

    'We are members of one body. We are responsible for each other'. I wouldn't start the essay with a quote, especially an important one you should be stating in your next paragraph. Throught the voice of the Inspector, Priestley conveys the fundamental message of his didactic play: collective responsibility or the concept fo everyone within a community being responsible for each other. I will explore how he conveys his message using structure, daramtic devices and decsriptive devices.You don't need to say "i will do xyz in my essay...". In the intro, you should give a very brief description of the ways in which Priestley does convey the need for collective responsibility (i.e. briefly answer the essay question). You did this well initially, saying "through the voice of the Inspector, Priestley conveys...", which the examiner will now know you will build upon later. Do this with other factors too; e.g. just mention a bit about Mr Birling in your intro and how he is used to promote responsibility, but don't go into too much depth as well!

    The 'chain of events' that lead to Eva's suicide is one way in which he does this. (This is a good example of using a point to begin with. All your main body paragraphs should begin with a point to show a "way in which he does" emphasise collective responsibility. Your 3rd paragraph doesn't really have this.) The plot's structure of having one action being linked to the next presents a dominio effect of each family member's actions and suggests how closely we are linkes in a society and that we should care for ecah other. Alternatively, one could interpret the 'chain' the inspector refers to as being a metaphor showing the linked members within a comunity and reinforce the idea that everybody within a community are 'members of one body'. Therefore, through the descriptive dveice of metaphor and structure, he conveys the significance of collective responsibility. You mention there is a metaphor and specific structure, but you don't explain the effect. You should go deeper into your analysis, for example: in the quote you said earlier ('We are members of one body. We are responsible for each other' the repetition (or if you wanna be fancy, anaphora in this case) of 'we' conveys the sense of mutual responsibility and togetherness that the Inspector wants to impart on the Birlings. And even better if you get the whole quote: "We don't live alone. We are members of one body. We are responsible for each other." - You could talk about the structure. The short, blunt sentences are presented so matter-of-factly by the Inspector that we take his words as a necessary truth rather than as his opinion (so he more successfully conveys the need of social responsibility!!).

    Moreover, Mr Birling - the Inspector's foil - who Priestley presents as a parsimonious (using fancy words is nice, but focus on making ur whole essay digestible and less clunky first) capitalist - shown by him saying 'lower wages and higher prices: a capitalist ideolgy and as an individual who rejects collective responsibility as he dismisses community as 'nonsense' - is constantly presented as ignorant and blind to reality (Clunky sentence - 4 dashes, 1 colon, 'and' 3 times, and about 5-7 clauses in one sentence!!!). Priestley carries the motif of sight throughout 'An Inspector Calls' which suggests the warped understanding of the superficial Birling family. When Mr Birling says 'I don't see' If you don't give the context or where in the play he says "I don't see", it's harder for the examiner to understand your point fully. So for example you could've said 'in response to the Inspector saying xyz, Birling says abcd...', Priestley is conveying how blind they are to the truth and how they are unable to see reality in its real form (Not a major point try improve the way you write, like 'reality in its real form' sounds a bit clunky!). This is reinforced by Priestley setting the scene as if the Birling's dining room was being seen through'rose tinted glass' and not with clarity. This is one of the more irrelevant quotes here. You didn't really say much about how it 'reinforces' it (except something about clarity). Either get rid of the quote or analyse it fully. You could say the rose-pink colour is quite soft, warm and comfortable, illustrating their relaxed/cosy lives which are shielded from the harsh realities of those others that are less fortunate in society. By expressing capitalist views through a character such as Mr Birling - who the audience spectating post 1945 will find disagreeable through Priestley's use of dramatic irony when Mr Birling dismisses the possibility of World War and dubs the Titanic 'unsinakble' depsite the number of deaths accounted for due to these events - Priestley presents how it is an individual of ignorant nature and wrong understanding who would have capitalist views and emphasises the importance of collective responsibility (quite a clunky sentence). At the conclusion of the play, Mr Birling's capitalist ideology is due to sink like the Titanic and therefore the mention of the Titanic is almost a method of foreshadowing for the conclusion of the play. Moreover, this point is emphasised with the dramatic device of the 'sharp ringing' of the door bell interrupting Mr Birling as he narrates his capitalist ideolgy suggetsing how ridiculous and disagreebale the concpet is. There are a lot of quotes flying around in this paragraph. I would say either split up the paragraph into 2 points and use the relevant quotes there, or just get rid of the irrelevant quotes that you can't talk a lot about. You merge everything about Mr Birling into this paragraph. Instead you could separate it like this: Have one paragraph showing the Inspector's role (which was your first main-body paragraph in ur essay, good!), then another paragraph showing how Mr Birling alone emphasises the need for collective responsibility. For this paragraph you would then include quotes that make him seem uncaring (find quotes) and ignorant (e.g. the titanic stuff) and show how this conveys the need for responsibility. After this, a third paragraph could be about the direct interaction between the Inspector and Mr Birling highlighting the need for responsibility: here you can talk about Birling being his foil, and include that "I don't see" quote in response to the Inspector, or any other confrontation between these two men that is relevant. This would break this paragraph up nicely and make the quotes less out of place and awkwardly placed.

    'If men will not learn that lesson then they will be taught in fire and blood and anguish'. I generally wouldn't just start a paragraph with a quote and its analysis. You need a point first (which addresses the essay title), and the quote should be evidence for this point, and then you analyse that evidence. For example the point here could be something alone the lines of the Inspector becoming intense and aggressive when he preaches the main message of the play (that they must learn social responsibility or suffer the consequences), in a last-ditch attempt to show the Birlings the right path. After saying this, you then should talk about the hellish imagery (which u did pretty well), and you could even compare it to the Inspector's previous calm and composed tone shown in the rest of the play before now, and how this makes his current actions more powerful. The polysyndeton of 'and' emphasises the myriad of ways one could be punished for rejecting collective responsibility. One could interpret the Inspector as using hell imagery to compare rejecting this concept to a sin punishable by being sent to Hell suggesting that religion and God wanted humanity to recognise collective responsibility as required on Earth. On the other hand, Priestley may be referring to the World Wards and Priestley is blaming political leaders rejecting responsibility in a community that led to countless deaths. Through the use of hell imagery, Priestley conveys the importance of collective responsibility.

    I feel that Priestley uses many devices to express the importance he places on collective responsibilty. Devices are used, but it isn't really useful to just mention that they "use devices" to show something. This is a generic thing that loads of people can say in literally any essay on any book or play. You conclusion is supposed to summarise the points you made in your essay, (and maybe add an interesting insight after if you can). So here you should directly answer how he emphasises the importance of collective responsibility: for example 1. Priestley has the Inspector as the driving force of this idea. This is exemplified in his final speech to the Birlings (where half your quotes came from!). 2. You can mention your point about Mr Birling being the Inspector's foil and an undesirable character, and how he is an example of what the audience should avoid. 3. Something you could've talked about a bit in your essay which I think may have been good in showing the importance of collective responsibility would have been the effects of being irresponsible (the disastrous effects of irresponsibility thus highlight the need for collective responsibility). You could have talked about Eva, and the way the Inspector describes her. Quotes include: "she lies with a burnt-out inside on a slab", or "with no relatives to help her, few friends, lonely, half starved, she was feeling desperate", or literally any quote that shows Eva as a victim due to the Birling's lack of responsibility.. Additional points like this that actually address the question are good to have. The Inspector's final words within the play even link to the Old Testament suggesting how even religion - a vital concept in society at the time - recognises rejecting responsibilty within a community as a sin and reinforcing how much is it is needed to esnure that society is at its best. <--- I think there are more important things to talk about than religion, e.g. stuff i said earlier lol

    I'm not a marker so I can't really judge it out of 20. Saying that, I would give this around a 6/7 out of 9 on the 9-1 scale thing. Making the essay easy to read with better grammar and sentences would easily make it a 7, while giving better analysis and points to answer the question would get you to the A* region. Also remember i'm not a teacher, so don't take everything I say at face value!!! I am likely to be wrong in some areas too lol
    ]

    woww how much tine did you spend on this
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    (Original post by Lemur14)
    Hi there :wavey:
    I've moved your thread to the English study help forum where hopefully you'll get more answers In future, it's best to select the subject from the list here and create a thread in there instead :yep: If you want to see where threads belong, check out this thread
    Thanks!
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    (Original post by Pravi29)
    Thanks!
    You're welcome
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    (Original post by happysmile)
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    woww how much tine did you spend on this
    at least 20-30 mins!! but it's fine i had time to kill
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    (Original post by NeedHelpHelpNeed)
    at least 20-30 mins!! but it's fine i had time to kill
    I really appreciated the help! Thanks for your time!
 
 
 
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