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I want to start coding again but I dunno where to start. watch

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    As the above suggests, Im very interested in coding, I learnt basic coding ins chool with ICT but they stopped offering it as an A-Level and I wasn't allowed to do computer science. I just want an idea of what type of useful coding languages are out there and your opinions on them.
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    (Original post by Juvilation)
    As the above suggests, Im very interested in coding, I learnt basic coding ins chool with ICT but they stopped offering it as an A-Level and I wasn't allowed to do computer science. I just want an idea of what type of useful coding languages are out there and your opinions on them.
    Code Academy
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    (Original post by IDOZ)
    Code Academy
    Ill check it out, tnx
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    (Original post by Juvilation)
    Ill check it out, tnx
    no problem
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    I agree with the above poster that Codecademy is a good place for starting out learning to code

    This might interest you too - a very good free online course presented by teaching staff at Harvard (The paid option is only for a certificate, all of the lectures and other course content are free):
    https://www.edx.org/course/cs50s-int...harvardx-cs50x
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    (Original post by winterscoming)
    I agree with the above poster that Codecademy is a good place for starting out learning to code

    This might interest you too - a very good free online course presented by teaching staff at Harvard (The paid option is only for a certificate, all of the lectures and other course content are free):
    https://www.edx.org/course/cs50s-int...harvardx-cs50x
    Thanks, ill check it out, lets say I have pretty much learnt a language, how would you suggest I use it in a real-life scenario?
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    (Original post by Juvilation)
    Thanks, ill check it out, lets say I have pretty much learnt a language, how would you suggest I use it in a real-life scenario?
    A programming language is a tool for solving problems, but different languages often lend themselves to different kinds of problems. For example, Java is a good language if you want to create an Android app, whereas Python is a good language for writing automation scripts. The 'C' language is often used to work with embedded/hardware devices, etc.

    The best thing to do is to think of something which interests you, and think of a project to work on, so if you were to write some kind of app, perhaps it'd be related to something else in your life - for example, if you or a friend/family happens to be working in a job where you could use a language to automate some repetitive part of that job, or maybe create some kind of app to help manage data for that job.

    If you don't have any ideas, consider working in an open-source project using the language of your choice - this is a really great way to get yourself some real-world experience solving problems, looking at and debugging existing code, likely also needing to work alongside other programmers who are also working on that open source project. Have a look at http://www.firsttimersonly.com/

    Lastly, learning a programming language isn't really the end, it's just the beginning. When you reach a point where you're comfortable in one programming language, you'll find that you have thousands of other things to learn about, including how to design and structure your code, how to "think" in terms of Object-Orientation, how to analyse and break down complex problems to turn them into something you can solve with a computer, and then how to use all kinds of tools and libraries which might help you do things like create a GUI, a web server, work with a database, draw some graphics, handle sound, communicate with other apps/devices over a network, etc.
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    Moved to Webmaster, coding and software dev.

    ...I don't get to say that very often!
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    (Original post by winterscoming)
    A programming language is a tool for solving problems, but different languages often lend themselves to different kinds of problems. For example, Java is a good language if you want to create an Android app, whereas Python is a good language for writing automation scripts. The 'C' language is often used to work with embedded/hardware devices, etc.

    The best thing to do is to think of something which interests you, and think of a project to work on, so if you were to write some kind of app, perhaps it'd be related to something else in your life - for example, if you or a friend/family happens to be working in a job where you could use a language to automate some repetitive part of that job, or maybe create some kind of app to help manage data for that job.

    If you don't have any ideas, consider working in an open-source project using the language of your choice - this is a really great way to get yourself some real-world experience solving problems, looking at and debugging existing code, likely also needing to work alongside other programmers who are also working on that open source project. Have a look at http://www.firsttimersonly.com/

    Lastly, learning a programming language isn't really the end, it's just the beginning. When you reach a point where you're comfortable in one programming language, you'll find that you have thousands of other things to learn about, including how to design and structure your code, how to "think" in terms of Object-Orientation, how to analyse and break down complex problems to turn them into something you can solve with a computer, and then how to use all kinds of tools and libraries which might help you do things like create a GUI, a web server, work with a database, draw some graphics, handle sound, communicate with other apps/devices over a network, etc.
    Thanks for the advice.
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    (Original post by AngryJellyfish)
    Moved to Webmaster, coding and software dev.

    ...I don't get to say that very often!
    lmao tnx
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    Udemy, Code Academy. Easy and useful language = Python, if complete beginner
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    I got some useful advice here:

    https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...2#post76502722
 
 
 
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