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How to deal with rude & rowdy students watch

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    I'm a learning support assistant in a 6th form college and usually work 1:1 which I love. However, once a week I run a computer-based learning session which is compulsory for most students. I dread it every week. There are several kids who do minimal work, on their phone constantly, chatting etc and when I approach them they become argumentative and rude. Today I've been in tears after. I tried to talk to the ringleader on his own but he had answer for everything and refused to show me any respect. I got nowhere. Thing is, I'm not a trained teacher so have limited experience in dealing with disruptive students, particularly in a group. I don't want to quit running these sessions as the students in question would probably enjoy that. I can always ask my seniors to speak to the disruptive ones but again that would look like I can't cope on my own (which I can't really, but I pretend to the students I can even though I feel like screaming at them and running away!). Any advice anyone? Thanks
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    tell them to leave the class if they are acting like that. thats what my math lecturer did last year and it works
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    Sadly I am not allowed to make them leave. We have to know where they are when they're in a timetabled lesson. Safeguarding
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    (Original post by Jools2018)
    Sadly I am not allowed to make them leave. We have to know where they are when they're in a timetabled lesson. Safeguarding
    Can you tell them to wait outside the classroom? Detention? If they don't show up nag their parents.
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    have a punishment system which punishs the whole class for their actions so that they will think twice about mis behaving
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    (Original post by Jools2018)
    I'm a learning support assistant in a 6th form college and usually work 1:1 which I love. However, once a week I run a computer-based learning session which is compulsory for most students. I dread it every week. There are several kids who do minimal work, on their phone constantly, chatting etc and when I approach them they become argumentative and rude. Today I've been in tears after. I tried to talk to the ringleader on his own but he had answer for everything and refused to show me any respect. I got nowhere. Thing is, I'm not a trained teacher so have limited experience in dealing with disruptive students, particularly in a group. I don't want to quit running these sessions as the students in question would probably enjoy that. I can always ask my seniors to speak to the disruptive ones but again that would look like I can't cope on my own (which I can't really, but I pretend to the students I can even though I feel like screaming at them and running away!). Any advice anyone? Thanks
    Why are you supervising this on your own? This is not rght - speak to someone senior as you aren't supposed to be put in charge of groups.
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    The not showing up is not a problem. They tend to always show up or it goes against their attendance. I just don't know how to deal with the disruptive ones. Today I found myself getting into a petty argument with one of them which just brought me down to his level. In the end I took a deep breath and walked away but I was shaking like a leaf. Another student decided to start rolling a cigarette in the middle of the session. I asked her to put it away immediately but she calmly finished rolling it first. I felt like I had no control
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    I'm a ring leader of my friendship group (because I'm the most likeable in the group and in the school), and I've leaded many organisations such as the Debating Club and School Council and I was part of the Senior Prefect team where we kept an eye on the Prefect team, I'm 17 years old so what I'm telling you are tips you need to consider and adapt in your own situation.

    1) If you use a warning system, drop it. It's one strike and out, I've noticed that teachers that use warning systems get far less respect because subconsciously we as students view the warning system- not as warnings- but as free passes. After all, what do I have to lose if I can talk for the entire lesson to my friend and if I get caught, I'd only get a warning. This was something I learnt in Debate Club, when I had enough one day, the club just started and I told one of the trouble makers to leave.

    2) Talk respectfully to them, they maybe devils in your eye and they are, what they could also be are troubled kids who don't have a good life at home or may not receive the attention and love they deserve. Or maybe they're genuine brats, in both cases talking respectfully to them means their fragile ego doesn't break and they'll listen rather than having to prove to the class how much of a rebel he/she is after the "disrespect" you shown them.

    3) Refrain from screaming, when you scream you display that you are weak since you have to go above and beyond to get your message across. Screaming is a temporary solution, you scream, they stay quiet for a few minutes, you catch your breath and move on and then they start again.

    4) Give positive reinforcements. For example, I made sure that whoever launched a successful project in the Prefect team I made sure to let their contribution well know, the look on their face is pure gold because they like that their work has been appricaited and value. You can do the same, whoever produces the best work, let it be known, make that student's work an example to other classmates, they'll then be inspired to "prove themselves" to other classmates. Competition is key here, make other pupil's compete with each other and at the end of the day, everybody is better off than they were before.

    5) But sometimes, the students don't care about being viewed as the hard working kids, so what do you do then? You still give them positive reinforcement, change their grade from whatever failed grade they got to a slightly higher one and you thus encourage them that they have the potential, raise the grade enough so that they can stop thinking their destined for a life of uneducated failure but not too much that'll make them think "oh hey I don't need to revise I'm getting good grades", get them on their toes, raise their grades by 1 or two grade from time to time.

    6) Homework, when you set a deadline. Stick with it, as a student I've stopped taking homework seriously from teachers that say "oh 3/4 of the class didn't do the homework , ok I'll extend the deadline" because I know that I can then skip the homework. Once we were given YouTube link to a documentry we were suppose to watch, a BBC documentry for 1 hour and 30 minutes, after watching 5 minutes of it I remembered that the teacher that set this homework goes back on their word, so I stopped watching it. And I'm glad I did because the next day, a good majority of the class didn't watch the documentry and then we watched it in class, I saved myself 1 hour and 30 minutes from watching the same documentary twice.

    6) Finally, let them know that you care. That you want to do good for them, let them know that as a teacher you want to see your students succeed.

    Good luck.
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    These students can sense weakness. You need to stay calm and in control.

    You need to implement a punishment system and stick to it. Speak to your boss about what that should look like e.g. at my school it was warning 1, warning 2, 10 minute detention, 30 minute detention, removal from lesson (resulting in internal suspension). Then stick to your system, it's not about arguments or disrupting the lesson - you just say 'Dave, please stop doing X, that's a first warning'... if they do it again or argue back 'OK Dave, that's a second warning'. But you need to know your superiors will back you on any punishments you give out.

    Not shouting, just calmly go through your steps and refuse to engage with their negative behaviours. Shouting tell them instantly you have lost control and also means you have nowhere to go if they do something really bad. I think I shouted twice in two years working in a high school and on both occasions the entire class immediately silenced and stopped because they knew that meant it was serious. They will also know they have upset you which gives them power... if you stay calm they have no power.

    You can also ask to observe a teacher who is very good at behaviour management (especially if you can watch these students at the same time) and make some notes on what they do and ask them for some tips. I personally found this very helpful.
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    (Original post by Jools2018)
    Another student decided to start rolling a cigarette in the middle of the session. I asked her to put it away immediately but she calmly finished rolling it first. I felt like I had no control
    See thats the problem with modern teaching. They give you no authority over the kids. Back in my parents time you could just screw up the joint and their parents would kick them into shape.
 
 
 
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