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    Just wondering if that extra year is worth it? I'm already on a gap year and really curious if I'll be delaying (a possible time) graduating as a doctor.

    I've always wanted to be a doctor but in life, you need to be realistic and have a backup plan (for me, that's research).

    Dw, I will certainly strive to try and be one however it's nice to be prepared but then again, I don't want to be in my 30s by the time I graduate med school lol. Hopefully, I'll have a family and some stability in my career.

    ^^Please don't hate on my opinion above but that's just what I think

    Honest opinions will be appreciated
    Thanks!
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    (Original post by MarshmallowStars)
    Just wondering if that extra year is worth it? I'm already on a gap year and really curious if I'll be delaying (a possible time) graduating as a doctor.

    I've always wanted to be a doctor but in life, you need to be realistic and have a backup plan (for me, that's research).

    Dw, I will certainly strive to try and be one however it's nice to be prepared but then again, I don't want to be in my 30s by the time I graduate med school lol. Hopefully, I'll have a family and some stability in my career.

    ^^Please don't hate on my opinion above but that's just what I think

    Honest opinions will be appreciated
    Thanks!
    I think there are two ways of considering this.

    On the one hand, taking an extra year to get an MSci could help you later on once you do graduate entry medicine and start applying for jobs as a doctor. Assuming the MSci fits certain criteria (see page 14 here), you can get an extra point when you apply for your first job as a junior doctor which will help you get your preferred choice of FY1 job and location. It will also be an asset in future applications e.g. specialty training or consultancy. An extra year is really not a big deal at all, and you will already be familiar with that uni and the dept, and you might even get a publication out of it which will also be really helpful when you're applying for jobs as a doctor.

    On the other hand, if you're doing a biomed degree with the sole intention of doing GEM, then it's not unreasonable to want to save time and money and just start medicine sooner. A 2:1 BSc is still worth three points (though by the time you graduate med school the whole system will probably be revamped), so it's not like you're coming away with nothing to show for your time at uni.

    Ultimately we're talking about a decision you have to make in about three years time, not now. So if it were me, I'd see how I was getting on during the degree, what my relationship with the department was like, if I'd found an area of academic interest I was really keen on studying further, what student funding for GEM looks like in 2021 etc and make my decision based on those things.
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    I think there are two ways of considering this.

    On the one hand, taking an extra year to get an MSci could help you later on once you do graduate entry medicine and start applying for jobs as a doctor. Assuming the MSci fits certain criteria (see page 14 here), you can get an extra point when you apply for your first job as a junior doctor which will help you get your preferred choice of FY1 job and location. It will also be an asset in future applications e.g. specialty training or consultancy. An extra year is really not a big deal at all, and you will already be familiar with that uni and the dept, and you might even get a publication out of it which will also be really helpful when you're applying for jobs as a doctor.

    On the other hand, if you're doing a biomed degree with the sole intention of doing GEM, then it's not unreasonable to want to save time and money and just start medicine sooner. A 2:1 BSc is still worth three points (though by the time you graduate med school the whole system will probably be revamped), so it's not like you're coming away with nothing to show for your time at uni.

    Ultimately we're talking about a decision you have to make in about three years time, not now. So if it were me, I'd see how I was getting on during the degree, what my relationship with the department was like, if I'd found an area of academic interest I was really keen on studying further, what student funding for GEM looks like in 2021 etc and make my decision based on those things.
    Wow! That's a really informative response! Thank you
    Also thank you for reminding me that it's something to look into after my first year. That really helps me in that it's one less worry to think about now
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    (Original post by MarshmallowStars)
    Wow! That's a really informative response! Thank you
    Also thank you for reminding me that it's something to look into after my first year. That really helps me in that it's one less worry to think about now
    No problem, it's called masterly inactivity.
 
 
 
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