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    I've heard from a few proffessors, lecutrers and students that jump form GCSE to A level is usually harder than that of the jump from A levels to university. Obviously I'm very suspicious of this claim so I wondered what all you current or ex-university students thought? (I want to study English Literature but opinions from any field of study are welcome)
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    I study a chemistry-based course and i finish university in 3 weeks

    I found the gcse to a level transition much harder

    University has mostly been fine. Much better. The first year, in particular, was especially straightforward, with exams consisting of MCQs, short-answer questions, filling in blanks etc
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    Thanks, really makes it seem a lot less daunting in some ways than it's often made out to be I think.
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    (Original post by Peter Westbury)
    Thanks, really makes it seem a lot less daunting in some ways than it's often made out to be I think.
    Hello,

    You'll probably get some thoughts on subject choice since you invited that in your post. Just to give you my perspective, I studied English Lit too. In my 3rd year I got offered two excellent graduate schemes in finance (£30-£35k bracket) and an English Masters at Oxford. So if anyone tells you the job prospects are bad, please remember that most graduate schemes, included the highest paying, are looking for people they want to work with, not specific degrees.
    I'll add a disclaimer: you are more likely to get a higher paid job if you do something technical, but not stupidly more likely.
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    (Original post by lordringo)
    Hello,

    You'll probably get some thoughts on subject choice since you invited that in your post. Just to give you my perspective, I studied English Lit too. In my 3rd year I got offered two excellent graduate schemes in finance (£30-£35k bracket) and an English Masters at Oxford. So if anyone tells you the job prospects are bad, please remember that most graduate schemes, included the highest paying, are looking for people they want to work with, not specific degrees.
    I'll add a disclaimer: you are more likely to get a higher paid job if you do something technical, but not stupidly more likely.
    Aha funnily enough I've spent several weeks now looking at joining the Royal Engineers as an officer just in an attempt to hide from the constant 'English leads nowhere' people. I'm curious though, what university did you origionally attend if you don't mind my asking?
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    (Original post by Peter Westbury)
    Aha funnily enough I've spent several weeks now looking at joining the Royal Engineers as an officer just in an attempt to hide from the constant 'English leads nowhere' people. I'm curious though, what university did you origionally attend if you don't mind my asking?
    I don't mind the English Leads Nowhere people too much, but taking them seriously is unwise. The fact is, if you want to be an engineer, or a chemist, or a doctor, you need a specific degree, but if you want a career with big cash and lots of travel then you are looking much more towards the finance/banking sector which, contrary to the horseshit people spew on TSR, could not give a **** what degree you did if you're quick at learning and are personable. I went to Nottingham for undergrad, though that's more relevant to getting the Oxford Masters than the job stuff.
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    (Original post by Peter Westbury)
    I've heard from a few proffessors, lecutrers and students that jump form GCSE to A level is usually harder than that of the jump from A levels to university. Obviously I'm very suspicious of this claim so I wondered what all you current or ex-university students thought? (I want to study English Literature but opinions from any field of study are welcome)
    CompSci 1st year @ Edinburgh here.

    A lot of the programming content is basic. The only 'difficult, or 'new' part would be some of the mathematics and a few nuggets of extra theory.
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    Maths @ Luff here - tbh the jump GCSE to A level was probably harder for me - the difficulty is in whether you're prepared to work without teachers breathing down your back - if you are good at motivating yourself, the jump shouldn't be too hard
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    (Original post by lordringo)
    I don't mind the English Leads Nowhere people too much, but taking them seriously is unwise. The fact is, if you want to be an engineer, or a chemist, or a doctor, you need a specific degree, but if you want a career with big cash and lots of travel then you are looking much more towards the finance/banking sector which, contrary to the horseshit people spew on TSR, could not give a **** what degree you did if you're quick at learning and are personable. I went to Nottingham for undergrad, though that's more relevant to getting the Oxford Masters than the job stuff.
    I guess only time will tell for me then. Did you go on any of the creative writing modules while you were there/was there much competition for the module? This is my last question I swear
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    (Original post by Peter Westbury)
    I guess only time will tell for me then. Did you go on any of the creative writing modules while you were there/was there much competition for the module? This is my last question I swear
    The creative writing modules were extremely competitive, though I did not take any myself, because I felt they weren't quite academic enough for me. Almost everybody wants to do them, but most unis know this and try to ensure plenty of places.
    If there are any more Qs I'll happily answer, don't worry about it.
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    I did English Language and Literature and I’m about 3/4 of the way through an English Masters degree.
    I’ve applied for a funded PhD but I’m utterly clueless what I will do if I don’t get on it as so far the only job I’ve landed (I’m not knocking this as I was desperate for a job- any job) is a part time job in a call centre!
    I didn’t find the jump from GCSE to A-Level difficult at all. I did one new subject to me and did English and German. I found the English easy just as I found the first year of my degree easy. German was a bit trickier, but nothing I couldn’t handle.
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    I think GCSE’s were harder than a levels because there are too many of them. And A levels you choose your subjects so they’re likely to be ones you’re better at. Then uni is a big jump imo because you’re doing many facets of the same subject that you supposedly want to do but things can get complicated when you don’t necessarily do as well in one module as another. You can end up feeling like maybe the whole subject isn’t for me... especially that you work towards (usually) one final award.
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    (Original post by Little Popcorns)
    And A levels you choose your subjects so they’re likely to be ones you’re better at.
    Actually wanting to do well at your subject certainly helps.

    I found the jump to uni a lot easier to manage. It might have been to do with my subjects (physics and maths) being the same as my A-Level. So a lot of first year was going over stuff I had seen before. I also find universities more casual, like tehre is no exam board. The lecturers make the exams and tended to build thier tutorials around what would be on the exam which was certainly a lot eaiser to revise for compared to A-Level where exam boards seemed to enjoy throwing massive curve balls.
 
 
 
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