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    https://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgrad...-grad-dip.aspx

    It's a physics course for graduates of other sciences. Basically the 3rd year of the BSc, with some 2nd year options if needed.

    Can anyone find any other examples of course like this in science, specifically physics?

    I've come across another course that was for graduates of any discipline to go into practical astronomy, but it wasn't equivalent to the 3rd year of a BSc, as there was little to no maths/other physics expected as a prerequisite.

    Thanks.
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    (Original post by Omelette)
    https://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgrad...-grad-dip.aspx

    It's a physics course for graduates of other sciences. Basically the 3rd year of the BSc, with some 2nd year options if needed.

    Can anyone find any other examples of course like this in science, specifically physics?

    I've come across another course that was for graduates of any discipline to go into practical astronomy, but it wasn't equivalent to the 3rd year of a BSc, as there was little to no maths/other physics expected as a prerequisite.

    Thanks.
    Why does it have to include the equivalent of a third year?
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    I skim-read the link. Why do you think it's "basically the 3rd year of a BSc"? A course that says it's "designed... for physics graduates" would be pointless if it's just a repeat of the last year.

    Are you asking out of curiosity or for a reason? If it's for yourself, what are you wanting to do, and what have you done already?
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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    Why does it have to include the equivalent of a third year?
    So that it allows me to segue into a masters in physics. That means it needs all the mathematical emphasis and rigour of the tail end of a BSc.

    (Original post by Duncan2012)
    I skim-read the link. Why do you think it's "basically the 3rd year of a BSc"? A course that says it's "designed... for physics graduates" would be pointless if it's just a repeat of the last year.

    Are you asking out of curiosity or for a reason? If it's for yourself, what are you wanting to do, and what have you done already?
    Read it more carefully and you'll see that the course is almost identical to the 3rd year of their BSc.
    I don't know why a physics graduate would do this. Maybe they got a low grade but want to go into postgrad anyway.

    I already have an undergrad masters in chemistry and I'm looking for courses that allow me to study QM and it's related fields at MSc/PhD level. This course is perfect, but I can't see any others like it anywhere. I detest London, so the same thing in another location would be desirable.
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    (Original post by Omelette)
    Read it more carefully and you'll see that the course is almost identical to the 3rd year of their BSc.
    I don't know why a physics graduate would do this. Maybe they got a low grade but want to go into postgrad anyway.

    I already have an undergrad masters in chemistry and I'm looking for courses that allow me to study QM and it's related fields at MSc/PhD level. This course is perfect, but I can't see any others like it anywhere. I detest London, so the same thing in another location would be desirable.
    Ok makes sense but what I was getting at is that if you can find a course that is for grads of other sciences that doesn’t necessarily cover the third year of a BSc degree that may also prepare you for a masters in the subject.
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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    Ok makes sense but what I was getting at is that if you can find a course that is for grads of other sciences that doesn’t necessarily cover the third year of a BSc degree that may also prepare you for a masters in the subject.
    Something at that level is necessary though, or you're not going to have a clue what's going on.
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    (Original post by Omelette)
    Something at that level is necessary though, or you're not going to have a clue what's going on.
    Not necessarily. Lots of people change fields at various levels and through conversion or other courses or simply by self teaching. So no you don’t only have to depend on courses you describe.
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    People chop and change between fields that are easier to study at high levels than physics.

    You should ask a few physicists with masters degrees if they think someone without the mathematical training and physics background knowledge of a BSc student would have coped with their course.
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    Read it more carefully and you'll see that the course is almost identical to the 3rd year of their BSc.
    I don't know why a physics graduate would do this. Maybe they got a low grade but want to go into postgrad anyway.

    I already have an undergrad masters in chemistry and I'm looking for courses that allow me to study QM and it's related fields at MSc/PhD level. This course is perfect, but I can't see any others like it anywhere. I detest London, so the same thing in another location would be desirable.
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    [QUOTE=Omelette;76617144]People chop and change between fields that are easier to study at high levels than physics.

    Read it more carefully and you'll see that the course is almost identical to the 3rd year of their BSc.
    I don't know why a physics graduate would do this. Maybe they got a low grade but want to go into postgrad anyway.

    I already have an undergrad masters in chemistry and I'm looking for courses that allow me to study QM and it's related fields at MSc/PhD level. This course is perfect, but I can't see any others like it anywhere. I detest London, so the same thing in another location would be desirable.
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    I'm in a similarish position, my undergrad was in chemistry but I am going to move over to the squishy science (biology), namely immunology, I applied for and was accepted onto the masters course at Imperial. The first two modules of the course cover the kinda "basics" i guess but since its a masters i assume it'll be at a bit higher level than BSc but should still be comprehend-able, and anyway the self study, huge part of masters, will fill in any gaps. Also because I know I only have like a 1st/2nd year introductory knowledge of the immunology i bought a textbook aimed at undergrads to help me revise and have also sought out tutoring from a PhD student in a research group at UCL. You may want to consider trying similar things to help prep you, i mean its a masters course after all so you'll be expected to do a lot of self study anyhow. So if you do it now then even if the course doesn't start super basic you'll at least be on good footing.
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    Oh just realized this is about a post graduate diploma...

    Pretty sure most masters courses start of at postgraduate diploma level at least for the first couple of weeks
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    (Original post by TomW624)
    I'm in a similarish position, my undergrad was in chemistry but I am going to move over to the squishy science (biology), namely immunology, I applied for and was accepted onto the masters course at Imperial. The first two modules of the course cover the kinda "basics" i guess but since its a masters i assume it'll be at a bit higher level than BSc but should still be comprehend-able, and anyway the self study, huge part of masters, will fill in any gaps. Also because I know I only have like a 1st/2nd year introductory knowledge of the immunology i bought a textbook aimed at undergrads to help me revise and have also sought out tutoring from a PhD student in a research group at UCL. You may want to consider trying similar things to help prep you, i mean its a masters course after all so you'll be expected to do a lot of self study anyhow. So if you do it now then even if the course doesn't start super basic you'll at least be on good footing.
    I know there is a lot of self-study involved, that's not the issue. I was only trying to find courses that lead into MSc courses in physics, with all the maths and plenty of the relevant physics taken care of. One of the other guys seemed to think you can just apply for a masters in physics without a physics degree or something entirely equivalent, but that person is clearly deluded.

    I think it's being underestimated a bit how 'tall' a subject physics is, meaning the things you learn rely heavily on what has previously been learned.

    I've scoured the internet now and it looks like we're going to come up empty. Fingers crossed this course keeps running until I can afford it!

    Best of luck with the immunology masters, and cheers for the response!
 
 
 
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