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    Hi
    How can a refurbished laptop come RESET if it has Office 2016 insalled on it?
    Surely they would have to re-install, set up the OS and then install Office first?
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    Factory reset means it has been put into the same configuration it would have left the factory in. That does not mean reset to an empty hard drive. A factory reset is designed to return the machine to a factory state which means an OS is installed ready for use, any bloatware on the device is also present and so on.

    When OEMs (e.g. Dell, HP) release devices, odds are there's around 10GB of the hard drive that you can't use. This is where the factory image is stored in case you need to recover the laptop, factory reset it, etc.

    Of course that doesn't guarantee that a laptop originally came with Office or other bloatware. If you purchased a laptop second hand from somewhere like eBay, the seller could easily list it as factory reset but install extra software on their for you. It could be something like Office or more harmful malware.

    Unless otherwise listed though, a factory reset machine will still come with an OS installed
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Factory reset means it has been put into the same configuration it would have left the factory in. That does not mean reset to an empty hard drive. A factory reset is designed to return the machine to a factory state which means an OS is installed ready for use, any bloatware on the device is also present and so on.

    When OEMs (e.g. Dell, HP) release devices, odds are there's around 10GB of the hard drive that you can't use. This is where the factory image is stored in case you need to recover the laptop, factory reset it, etc.

    Of course that doesn't guarantee that a laptop originally came with Office or other bloatware. If you purchased a laptop second hand from somewhere like eBay, the seller could easily list it as factory reset but install extra software on their for you. It could be something like Office or more harmful malware.

    Unless otherwise listed though, a factory reset machine will still come with an OS installed
    so if I do buy it on eBay and it comes with office (and office wasn't on the factory image) does that mean they have had to set up the PC in th first place
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    (Original post by jsmith6131)
    so if I do buy it on eBay and it comes with office (and office wasn't on the factory image) does that mean they have had to set up the PC in th first place
    If Office was not preinstalled on the laptop or present in the factory image then yes, they would have to manually set up Windows and install it. Or install a different image that came with Office.

    Of course a laptop being supplied with Office doesn't necessarily mean it has been set up. They could just provide a product key for Office. But yes, if you somehow know for sure what the stock OS install looks like and a laptop comes with software that isn't part of that stock install then you can say that it has been powered on and modified in some way. Of course you can't really guarantee that this isn't true even when you buy machines that look like stock.

    If you aren't getting sealed packaging a good rule of thumb is to assume that the device has been tampered with and immediately factory reset. Odds are it's fine, especially if it's from a reputable seller but there's always the possibility that the device has been modified.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    If Office was not preinstalled on the laptop or present in the factory image then yes, they would have to manually set up Windows and install it. Or install a different image that came with Office.

    Of course a laptop being supplied with Office doesn't necessarily mean it has been set up. They could just provide a product key for Office. But yes, if you somehow know for sure what the stock OS install looks like and a laptop comes with software that isn't part of that stock install then you can say that it has been powered on and modified in some way. Of course you can't really guarantee that this isn't true even when you buy machines that look like stock.

    If you aren't getting sealed packaging a good rule of thumb is to assume that the device has been tampered with and immediately factory reset. Odds are it's fine, especially if it's from a reputable seller but there's always the possibility that the device has been modified.
    That sound sensible. Is it likely to harm the hard drive or hardware if I factory reset a laptop that has been refurbished? thanks
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    (Original post by jsmith6131)
    That sound sensible. Is it likely to harm the hard drive or hardware if I factory reset a laptop that has been refurbished? thanks
    There's no reason to think it would. The drives themselves have a finite lifespan, whether they're mechanical drives that wear out or SSDs that simply have a finite number of writes. An extra factory reset would not put an unreasonable amount of extra strain on a drive and cause any damage, it's fundamentally no different to writing files. You should be able to factory reset it with no problems and personally the first thing I'd do when buying a used device would be to get it back to stock.

    I'd honestly be more concerned about the age and quality of the drive on a refurbished laptop. If it's modern then the drive might be fine but if it's older you may find that it's actually getting close to it's limit. Hard drives for example are rated to last around 3 to 5 years, they may last longer or fail sooner. There's no guarantee but if I were purchasing a device with a spinning drive and didn't know how old it was, the paranoid part of me would want to remove the drive and replace it with a new one. That would also let me reinstall the OS from scratch, preferably a version direct from Microsoft rather than an OEM version with bloatware and keeps my security mind at peace. But for most people that's excessive. It's generally why I tend to stay away from buying refurbished devices though, there's so many variables that are difficult to account for. It might turn out that the refurbished device was dropped at some point which broke the screen, it was replaced and sold as refurb but it turns out the drive was also damaged. You can never know these things and on the whole I'd always try and buy brand new.
 
 
 

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