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    A rather cogent extract from a piece in the spectator about not jumping the gun on blaming the FSB for poisoning this chap.
    Thoughts?


    There have been instant suspicions that the FSB has attempted to repeat its murderous work, this time against the former military intelligence colonel Sergei Skripal. As yet these are only suspicions, but naturally the UK counter-terrorism authorities are impressed by the similarity between the outrages of 2006 and the present day.
    Before we think we have seen it all before, however, it is useful to consider an important difference. Alexander Litvinenko had spent years exposing malpractice in the FSB leadership, including his charge that the Russian secret services were responsible for the 1999 Moscow apartment bombing. This was the bombing that provided Putin, who was prime minister at the time, with the premise he needed to relaunch Russia’s war in Chechnya. Litvinenko also claimed that Putin is a paedophile. It is hard to imagine what more Litvinenko could have said to enrage Putin.
    By contrast, ex-Colonel Skripal lived quietly in Wiltshire, never raising his voice or lifting a pen to tear into the Russian administration. He served a term of imprisonment in Moscow before becoming part of a multiple spy-swap in 2010 when the Russians traded him for the FSB sleeper ‘Anna Chapman’. Whereas she eagerly became a Russian media celebrity, Skripal laid low. Perhaps the most he did was to continue to supply MI6 with valuable information on the basis of his experience.
    Putin has made no secret of his hatred of traitors. He himself oversees security policy. If Sergei and Yulia Skripal really were targeted by the FSB, no one can have confidence in any future agreement to live and let live those spies who obtain their freedom by bilateral governmental assent. And if true, it would seem that relatives of traitors are regarded as fair game again (as, for instance, Trotsky’s sons were in the 1930s).
    Boris Johnson has blustered that we could terrify Putin by withdrawing the English national squad from the Fifa World Cup tournament in Russia. This would be no more than a slap on the wrist. Johnson might usefully consider how, in 1971, his predecessor at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office Alec Douglas-Home expelled 90 Soviet diplomats for espionage. Icy relations followed, but the British authorities earned lasting respect and Moscow thought twice about offending London.
    Does London retain a priority for engorging laundered Russian finance in preference to planning for serious potential retaliation? May’s cabinet has talked up its ambition to seize back control of our country’s affairs. Control over the safety of UK residents would make a good start.
    https://www.spectator.co.uk/2018/03/...l-from-russia/
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    Nobody knows 😱
    But apparently they denied any involvement regarding his death so...idk tbh
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    They are the main suspect for obvious reasons. Although jumping to conclusions is unwise.
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    A normal person that watches mainstream media - Yes, all the current evidence points towards Russia
    A conspiracy theorist - No, it was a false flag attack to frame Russia. Because Russia are the best (*cough* Napp *cough*)
    A clever person that makes a analytical decision based on genuine evidence - I don't ****ing know.
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    (Original post by The PoliticalGuy)
    A normal person that watches mainstream media - Yes, all the current evidence points towards Russia
    A conspiracy theorist - No, it was a false flag attack to frame Russia. Because Russia are the best (*cough* Napp *cough*)
    A clever person that makes a analytical decision based on genuine evidence - I don't ****ing know.
    Pot meet kettle 😂
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    (Original post by The PoliticalGuy)
    A normal person that watches mainstream media - Yes, all the current evidence points towards Russia
    A conspiracy theorist - No, it was a false flag attack to frame Russia. Because Russia are the best (*cough* Napp *cough*)
    A clever person that makes a analytical decision based on genuine evidence - I don't ****ing know.
    😂😂😂
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    The point of the article isn't to urge caution in blaming the FSB. The point it's making is that the case is far more severe than the Litvinenko affair because it means Putin is targeting ex-spies (and their families) who don't even seem particularly threatening to his regime.
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    What other organ could reasonably gain access to nerve agents?

    Early indications certainly suggest that it's likely it was Russia.

    Occam's razor applies.
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    maybe it was the Bulgarians.... they murdered Georgi Markov with a nerve agent in London.
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    Of course the Russians were behind it. They don't need a motive to murder people. The Kremlin wants to destroy Western civilisation and everything we stand for, and attacking our intelligence assets is but one part of the war they are waging against us.
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    British security target Russian national and falsely blame Russians.
    The sheeple lap it up. The state controls you.
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    (Original post by Death and Taxes)
    British security target Russian national and falsely blame Russians.
    The sheeple lap it up. The state controls you.
    Which state controls who?
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    Perhaps someone was trying to wag the dog
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    Highly unlikely. This wreaks of a false flag.
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    (Original post by Captain Haddock)
    The point of the article isn't to urge caution in blaming the FSB. The point it's making is that the case is far more severe than the Litvinenko affair because it means Putin is targeting ex-spies (and their families) who don't even seem particularly threatening to his regime.
    I would argue it makes both points in tandem. albeit i see it making the point of not making rash prejudgments to be the salient one.

    (Original post by Drewski)
    What other organ could reasonably gain access to nerve agents?

    Early indications certainly suggest that it's likely it was Russia.

    Occam's razor applies.
    I would point out using the easy explanation in a case such as this is not only profoundly lazy but downright dangerous.

    (Original post by AngeryPenguin)
    Of course the Russians were behind it. They don't need a motive to murder people. The Kremlin wants to destroy Western civilisation and everything we stand for, and attacking our intelligence assets is but one part of the war they are waging against us.
    Hello pot, have you met my friend kettle?
    Have you got a shred of evidence to back up the claim that Russia wants to see "the west" burn?
    I mean they obviously would like, in a broad sense, to humble the west [America] but to tear it down? I think not.
    Equally how are they waging war against us? Neither Syria nor Ukraine is "the west" and thus those are irrelevant and one would point out taking out malicious facebook ads does not a war make.
 
 
 

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