Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    I am very interested in practicing Law in the future, emphasis being on practice and not study since many qualified solicitors and barristers did not study Law and did the GDL later on so obviously this is an option for me too.

    I am taking History, Sociology, Economics and an EPQ and want people to suggest some interesting courses that I could apply for other than Law. I do not really want to study History or Sociology and I am planning on applying to Oxbridge
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by A.H365)
    I am very interested in practicing Law in the future, emphasis being on practice and not study since many qualified solicitors and barristers did not study Law and did the GDL later on so obviously this is an option for me too.

    I am taking History, Sociology, Economics and an EPQ and want people to suggest some interesting courses that I could apply for other than Law. I do not really want to study History or Sociology and I am planning on applying to Oxbridge
    Try looking through the courses offered at Oxford and Cambridge. You might be attracted to something like HSPS at Cambridge.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    You're missing out on many fascinating things in law study, I assure you.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ageshallnot)
    Try looking through the courses offered at Oxford and Cambridge. You might be attracted to something like HSPS at Cambridge.
    Yeah, that is something I have already considered heavily. It is of interest to me but I don't know if I want to commit to this to be honest. It does seem very interesting though. One of the better social sciences courses
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JohanGRK)
    You're missing out on many fascinating things in law study, I assure you.
    Yeah that is true. I have heard Law is very interesting. I think I am just going to end up applying to Law to be honest but at the same time I want to make sure I have checked out all my options

    Do you study Law? If so, where and how is it?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ageshallnot)
    Try looking through the courses offered at Oxford and Cambridge. You might be attracted to something like HSPS at Cambridge.
    Also, I wanted some courses at Non-Oxbridge universities since me being admitted into either is always unlikely and I want to explore other great courses at other Uni's like LSE, UCL, Bristol...
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by A.H365)
    Yeah that is true. I have heard Law is very interesting. I think I am just going to end up applying to Law to be honest but at the same time I want to make sure I have checked out all my options
    I was half-kidding. The normative questions in law can be very interesting or very dull, depending on which modules you enjoy. I developed an interest in private law theory by accident, and it's great - it covers a variety of moral and economic questions, and introduces you to a lot of 'hard' methodology in the process (e.g. what is called legal formalism). However, I hate the stupid 'theory' questions in land law, which seem to be a combination of really basic public policy ("we must ensure land is alienable! does the law do this at the moment?") and a very dry analysis of judicial statements.

    The positive questions (i.e. what the law says) are interesting when you first read about a topic and try to get to the bottom of it (it's like you're creating a flowchart of possible inputs and outputs - if X, the law says Y should happen), but they get tedious over the course of a degree, particularly when you have to learn them thoroughly for exams.

    I'd suggest a generic social sciences degree if you're not a very technically minded person. You won't be lost in the detail, and you'll be able to cover a wider range of social and political issues. Try one of the 'Politics+' courses.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    I intend on doing a law conversion after undergrad and have applied for Philosophy
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by A.H365)
    I am very interested in practicing Law in the future, emphasis being on practice and not study since many qualified solicitors and barristers did not study Law and did the GDL later on so obviously this is an option for me too.

    I am taking History, Sociology, Economics and an EPQ and want people to suggest some interesting courses that I could apply for other than Law. I do not really want to study History or Sociology and I am planning on applying to Oxbridge
    There are people who will advise that you do not study law. For one, law is supposed to be boring. Another thing, you will get a broader intellectual pedigree if you study a degree such as history or languages and then study law. I think this latter point is true; and when you're going towards the bar, your intellectual pedigree is quite important not only for getting pupillage or tenancy but helps with your practice and your abilities as a lawyer. I have a broad range of interests, wanted to do linguistics or history or English, but decided to go with law -- I wondered in first year if I made the right choice.

    For me, I hate learning pedagogical tables out of a textbook or reductionist mnemonics. Some of the core subjects, particularly contract and the other foundation topics on a Qualifying Law Degree, tend to have this quality. This does not take intellectual skill, or even much attention -- learning this stuff requires you to be "in attendance" and vaguely with it. The fun comes when you are reading through judgments and coming up with your own ideas about the law -- the more judgment-heavy (for me), the more fun the law is (as a student). Equity, torts, and commercial law have this quality. To appreciate these topics truly, you need to have decent intellect and a certain degree of skill.

    I think I would have liked to have studied HSPS or liberal arts. One of those subjects where you have the ability to study everything. But law covers everything, so you by the way touch upon everything you could imagine. Natural/industrial disasters, spy rings, works of art and their public value, legal and political history, cultural and intellectual history, medical/life sciences. Just you're not usually directly examined on these.
    • Community Assistant
    Online

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by A.H365)
    I am very interested in practicing Law in the future, emphasis being on practice and not study since many qualified solicitors and barristers did not study Law and did the GDL later on so obviously this is an option for me too.

    I am taking History, Sociology, Economics and an EPQ and want people to suggest some interesting courses that I could apply for other than Law. I do not really want to study History or Sociology and I am planning on applying to Oxbridge
    Why don't you want to study history? It's a very common choice for lawyers I believe.

    It's hard to suggest courses, because you can't study a science subject, as you don't have science A-levels, but it sounds like you aren't interested in humanities/social sciences either?

    What do you enjoy studying? Have you considered a joint honours?

    What about archeology and anthropology- it's similar to history and sociology, but different enough that it might appeal?
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Notoriety)
    There are people who will advise that you do not study law. For one, law is supposed to be boring. Another thing, you will get a broader intellectual pedigree if you study a degree such as history or languages and then study law. I think this latter point is true; and when you're going towards the bar, your intellectual pedigree is quite important not only for getting pupillage or tenancy but helps with your practice and your abilities as a lawyer. I have a broad range of interests, wanted to do linguistics or history or English, but decided to go with law -- I wondered in first year if I made the right choice.

    For me, I hate learning pedagogical tables out of a textbook or reductionist mnemonics. Some of the core subjects, particularly contract and the other foundation topics on a Qualifying Law Degree, tend to have this quality. This does not take intellectual skill, or even much attention -- learning this stuff requires you to be "in attendance" and vaguely with it. The fun comes when you are reading through judgments and coming up with your own ideas about the law -- the more judgment-heavy (for me), the more fun the law is (as a student). Equity, torts, and commercial law have this quality. To appreciate these topics truly, you need to have decent intellect and a certain degree of skill.

    I think I would have liked to have studied HSPS or liberal arts. One of those subjects where you have the ability to study everything. But law covers everything, so you by the way touch upon everything you could imagine. Natural/industrial disasters, spy rings, works of art and their public value, legal and political history, cultural and intellectual history, medical/life sciences. Just you're not usually directly examined on these.
    I would have studied Econ, but I didn't end up getting an A* in Maths, so that was out of the question

    I think that you're an outlier among law students! Most of them/us seem to be very keen on nailing down the state of the law with maximum certainty (and knowledge as to where it is uncertain), cramming that knowledge a month before exams start, and moving on with their lives.

    I think I'm in the middle - I don't enjoy reading mundane judgments which have a single, straightforward ratio - I don't have the time or patience for that (hence why I have never read a single criminal case in full no matter what my teacher would tell me). However, I really enjoy reading those landmark decisions that either have several distinct lines of reasoning (e.g. McFarlane and wrongful birth cases in tort) or decisions which are generally revolutionary in some way and have wide-reaching implications (e.g. Bruton v London and Quadrant Housing Trust in land law). I'm more than happy to spend my time going on Westlaw and getting the goodness from the source itself
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JohanGRK)
    I would have studied Econ, but I didn't end up getting an A* in Maths, so that was out of the question

    I think that you're an outlier among law students! Most of them/us seem to be very keen on nailing down the state of the law with maximum certainty (and knowledge as to where it is uncertain), cramming that knowledge a month before exams start, and moving on with their lives.

    I think I'm in the middle - I don't enjoy reading mundane judgments which have a single, straightforward ratio - I don't have the time or patience for that (hence why I have never read a single criminal case in full no matter what my teacher would tell me). However, I really enjoy reading those landmark decisions that either have several distinct lines of reasoning (e.g. McFarlane and wrongful birth cases in tort) or decisions which are generally revolutionary in some way and have wide-reaching implications (e.g. Bruton v London and Quadrant Housing Trust in land law). I'm more than happy to spend my time going on Westlaw and getting the goodness from the source itself
    Yeah, part of the degree I am doing focusses on macro-economic theory and some politics. It is very engaging and technical, though most of it goes over my head. It would be an ideal alternative for many law students. Sciences would have been great, too, and many lib arts courses allow you to study STEM topics. Would have been incredibly enjoyable. The socsci/anthro stuff is far too soft, mind; pal did it in Bristol and her work was incredibly simple (and easy to get 75-80%).

    I did law with the certainty approach first year and really hated it. I enjoy that eureka! feeling; the more dissecting judgments (few people have looked at), the more satisfying studying is. I loved my disso for that reason. Little academic commentary and everything I was saying was pretty much what I found/developed myself.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Notoriety)
    I did law with the certainty approach first year and really hated it. I enjoy that eureka! feeling; the more dissecting judgments (few people have looked at), the more satisfying studying is. I loved my disso for that reason. Little academic commentary and everything I was saying was pretty much what I found/developed myself.
    Great minds think alike haha - I realised, after posting my previous post, that I forgot to mention the eureka feeling. That feeling, of being a detective, is great. It seems that the process of finding and understanding the outcome in a particularly tough area of law is more interesting than having the outcome spoon-fed to you and learning it off by heart for cold, instrumental purposes (exams and/or assessment centres where applicable).

    If you don't mind me asking, what area of law did you do your dissertation in?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alicelmoro2)
    I intend on doing a law conversion after undergrad and have applied for Philosophy
    Ah interesting. Why did you choose not to study Law?
    Philosophy is very interesting.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SarcAndSpark)
    Why don't you want to study history? It's a very common choice for lawyers I believe.

    It's hard to suggest courses, because you can't study a science subject, as you don't have science A-levels, but it sounds like you aren't interested in humanities/social sciences either?

    What do you enjoy studying? Have you considered a joint honours?

    What about archeology and anthropology- it's similar to history and sociology, but different enough that it might appeal?
    I don't feel like I am passionate enough to endure a History degree even though I am enjoying the A-Level.

    I am very interested in humanities and social sciences but I can't seem to find a degree that really appeals to me. HSPS is something that I am considering but other than that I cannot find many.

    Joint honour degrees are fine but I don't know what I would want to study jointly.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JohanGRK)
    Great minds think alike haha - I realised, after posting my previous post, that I forgot to mention the eureka feeling. That feeling, of being a detective, is great. It seems that the process of finding and understanding the outcome in a particularly tough area of law is more interesting than having the outcome spoon-fed to you and learning it off by heart for cold, instrumental purposes (exams and/or assessment centres where applicable).

    If you don't mind me asking, what area of law did you do your dissertation in?
    It was commercial. I did it on commercial warranties, i.e. as found in chater-parties and in the Marine Insurance Act 1906 (which had been incorporated into ordinary insurance contracts also).

    In the olden days, absolute risk warranties were brutally harsh and practical (which simply apportions responsibility after a complex shipping accident, i.e. it's the ship owner's fault and their insurer will pay out) but how they've weakened in recent years to be more cuddly and equitable. Which I oppose.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Just a quick suggestion; not sure if it’s what you’re looking for but what about Liberal Arts? King’s College London do a nice LA degree; there’s also obviously joint honour LLB courses so you can get the best of both worlds?

    I think I’m in pretty much the opposite boat to you; would very much like to study law but doubt I want to practice it.
    • Community Assistant
    Online

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by A.H365)
    I don't feel like I am passionate enough to endure a History degree even though I am enjoying the A-Level.

    I am very interested in humanities and social sciences but I can't seem to find a degree that really appeals to me. HSPS is something that I am considering but other than that I cannot find many.

    Joint honour degrees are fine but I don't know what I would want to study jointly.
    Given you want to practice law and you're not sure what else to study, why not just study law? Yes, lots of lawyers don't- but it wouldn't be a hindrance in your future career.

    Why not look at course lists for unis you're interested in, and see if anything jumps out?

    I believe UCL offers a liberal arts degree, and also a social sciences one. These could be good options if you don't want to specialise yet?
 
 
 

3,415

students online now

800,000+

Exam discussions

Find your exam discussion here

Poll
Should predicted grades be removed from the uni application process
Applying to uni

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Graduates celebrate

How to write a good personal statement

Expert PS advice from the people who will read it

Uni match

Uni match

Can't decide where to apply? Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Two students working together

A-Z of universities

Read our guides to unis and colleges from around the UK

A student working on a computer

Personal statement help

Use our tool to get your ideal PS quickly!

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student looking down a microscope

Planning open days

Find upcoming open days and get advice on preparing.

Help out other students

These questions still need an answer

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.