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    Torn between Exeter law: AAB requirements (Only AAB if firmed)
    and Queen Mary Law and Politics: AAA requirements

    Which should I firm?
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    I don't know much about Queen Mary but Exeter was going to be my choice, but they don't have an MA law (since it'll be my second degree). I'm currently deciding between Bristol, Sheffield, and Gloucestershire. I posted a thread but no replies yet.
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    (Original post by Lxs152)
    I don't know much about Queen Mary but Exeter was going to be my choice, but they don't have an MA law (since it'll be my second degree). I'm currently deciding between Bristol, Sheffield, and Gloucestershire. I posted a thread but no replies yet.
    Whether it's LLB Senior Status or MA Law, they're the same thing. (I'll reply here for you.)

    (Original post by vinyvidy)
    Torn between Exeter law: AAB requirements (Only AAB if firmed)
    and Queen Mary Law and Politics: AAA requirements

    Which should I firm?
    Whichever you like more. Be reminded that QM is doss for everything but law and medicine. By taking this offer, you're exposing yourself partially to a crap course (QM Politics). Also be reminded that QM plays games with entry requirements; giving higher offers than they actually want or will accept in order to make it seem their course is more desirable. Exeter does not play this game. Lastly think about where you want to live and study; QM is not rated for its locale.
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    (Original post by Notoriety)
    Whichever you like more. Be reminded that QM is doss for everything but law and medicine. By taking this offer, you're exposing yourself partially to a crap course (QM Politics). Also be reminded that QM plays games with entry requirements; giving higher offers than they actually want or will accept in order to make it seem their course is more desirable. Exeter does not play this game. Lastly think about where you want to live and study; QM is not rated for its locale.
    Would LLB senior status be equivalent to fast track then, since both are 2 years? This is unclear on the websites and emails take a week or two for a reply.
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    (Original post by Lxs152)
    Would LLB senior status be equivalent to fast track then, since both are 2 years? This is unclear on the websites and emails take a week or two for a reply.
    Yep, both are QLDs and contain the same number of credits and are run over the same period (i.e. 2 years non-stop, no summer). The difference, of course, is that the fast-track is aimed for everyone (first time undergrads and postgrads) while the grad/senior status LLB/MA Law are only directed at grads.

    I would not recommend the fast-track. There is a serious difference between Gloucestershire and Bristol. But remember what I said: MA Law and LLB Grad are the same thing. The MA is not a true MA and is only going to impress people who know nothing about law.
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    (Original post by Notoriety)
    Yep, both are QLDs and contain the same number of credits and are run over the same period (i.e. 2 years non-stop, no summer). The difference, of course, is that the fast-track is aimed for everyone (first time undergrads and postgrads) while the grad/senior status LLB/MA Law are only directed at grads.

    I would not recommend the fast-track. There is a serious difference between Gloucestershire and Bristol. But remember what I said: MA Law and LLB Grad are the same thing. The MA is not a true MA and is only going to impress people who know nothing about law.
    Thank you! That's more information I've been able to find. So you would say definitely Bristol over Gloucestershire (though it's my preferred location and would be about £3k cheaper).

    Next question is, the MA Law isn't a true MA, so would it be equally beneficial for me to do an MA creative + Critical writing (at Glos, since it's higher ranked for this than law, but there may be one at Bristol). I'll already have an undergraduate degree in Literature / French / West European Studies from an accredited US uni, so would it matter if I get a grad degree in law or English?
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    (Original post by Notoriety)
    Yep, both are QLDs and contain the same number of credits and are run over the same period (i.e. 2 years non-stop, no summer). The difference, of course, is that the fast-track is aimed for everyone (first time undergrads and postgrads) while the grad/senior status LLB/MA Law are only directed at grads.

    I would not recommend the fast-track. There is a serious difference between Gloucestershire and Bristol. But remember what I said: MA Law and LLB Grad are the same thing. The MA is not a true MA and is only going to impress people who know nothing about law.
    Side note, there's also a course at Glos for MRes for English or for "Accounting and Law".
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    (Original post by Notoriety)
    Yep, both are QLDs and contain the same number of credits and are run over the same period (i.e. 2 years non-stop, no summer). The difference, of course, is that the fast-track is aimed for everyone (first time undergrads and postgrads) while the grad/senior status LLB/MA Law are only directed at grads.

    I would not recommend the fast-track. There is a serious difference between Gloucestershire and Bristol. But remember what I said: MA Law and LLB Grad are the same thing. The MA is not a true MA and is only going to impress people who know nothing about law.
    How is the Bristol MA not a “true” MA? What do you mean by this remark?
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    (Original post by vnupe)
    How is the Bristol MA not a “true” MA? What do you mean by this remark?
    I mean that it is not a true MA; I could not be clearer. Why do I think this, did you mean to ask?

    Because it is the same as every other LLB Grad. It is 2 years long and covers the same core modules (contract, criminal ...). The difference is that Bristol identifies the credits taken as level 7. There is no difference (bar notional) in the harshness of assessment or the complexity of the content, compared to level 4, 5 or 6 contract, criminal ... . No one would treat MA Law as the same as Bristol's 1-year LLM, which covers far more advanced topics.
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    (Original post by Notoriety)
    I mean that it is not a true MA; I could not be clearer. Why do I think this, did you mean to ask?

    Because it is the same as every other LLB Grad. It is 2 years long and covers the same core modules (contract, criminal ...). The difference is that Bristol identifies the credits taken as level 7. There is no difference (bar notional) in the harshness of assessment or the complexity of the content, compared to level 4, 5 or 6 contract, criminal ... . No one would treat MA Law as the same as Bristol's 1-year LLM, which covers far more advanced topics.
    Just as I thought, you are spewing nonsense from an uninformed perspective... it is disappointing, especially as you aim to speak with such authority and brio... have you even finished your LLB/BA degree?
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    (Original post by vnupe)
    Just as I thought, you are spewing nonsense from an uninformed perspective... it is disappointing, especially as you aim to speak with such authority and brio... have you even finished your LLB/BA degree?
    Though I do love ellipses, if you'd care to explain how I am wrong I would love to hear it.

    No, just doing A-Levels at the mo, but done a lot of research in law and legal practice. What about you?
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    (Original post by Notoriety)
    Though I do love ellipses, if you'd care to explain how I am wrong I would love to hear it.

    No, just doing A-Levels at the mo, but done a lot of research in law and legal practice. What about you?
    Yup just as I thought, I am a barrister (in legal practice) actually who not only performed the research but also has gone through the process. I also attended U of Bris and graduated with the MA in Law.

    Additionally I remember doubling up on classes as part of the MA course, as we not only had to learn the nuts and bolts in the traditional undergrad/LLB pedagogy, but also advanced topics thereby justifying the Masters criteria, and having specialised exams (separate from the LLBers).

    I also remember taking classes with the other Master’s students (LLM) and sharing tutorials with them, while never doing the same with the LLBers.

    In full disclosure, some of our lectures were combined with the undergrads, but a sufficient number of our classes (approx. 50%) were solely approached from the Postgrad perspective.

    So from the outside looking in, it may not (to some) appear that there is a difference, I can assure you as can others from my cohort etc a material difference.

    Lastly, I do love a little bit of ellipses...
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    (Original post by vnupe)
    Yup just as I thought, I am a barrister (in legal practice) actually who not only performed the research but also has gone through the process. I also attended U of Bris and graduated with the MA in Law.

    Additionally I remember doubling up on classes as part of the MA course, as we not only had to learn the nuts and bolts in the traditional undergrad/LLB pedagogy, but also advanced topics thereby justifying the Masters criteria, and having specialised exams (separate from the LLBers).

    I also remember taking classes with the other Master’s students (LLM) and sharing tutorials with them, while never doing the same with the LLBers.

    In full disclosure, some of our lectures were combined with the undergrads, but a sufficient number of our classes (approx. 50%) were solely approached from the Postgrad perspective.

    So from the outside looking in, it may not (to some) appear that there is a difference, I can assure you as can others from my cohort etc a material difference.

    Lastly, I do love a little bit of ellipses...
    The MA Law is 240 credits. 210 of those credits are taken up by the seven foundation topics, meaning you can take one further 30 credit at level 7. So if my contention is correct that the 210 are doss, you only truly experienced 30 credits max of master's-level content. By the way, undergrads (with permission of their programme director) can do this! So if I am correct, you have as much experience as one of my mates who took master's level financial law in his third year. (Notably, there is no disso requirement for the MA Law. LLMs all do lengthy dissos, and this forms the majority of their mark usually. On Bristol's LLM it's 60 credits (so worth two modules).)

    What do we know about the 210 credits from what you've told us? You sat different exams and completed different assessments. Well, the foundation modules on the LLB are 20 credits and the foundation topics on the MA Law programme are 30. Ditto, my 30 credit company law module had people on it only completing 15 credits and they sat an exam in Jan rather than in May. We covered more content, but nevertheless we were both assessed on term-one content -- the questions were the same. The people who left the module halfway through got similar grades to the rest of us. Different assessments means little.

    If it were true that your assessments, of the same content delivered, were entirely different from the LLBers' (given that core content is pretty much the same at every law school in the UK, so unlikely), that would actually weaken your claim. It is well known to anyone who's studied an LLM that LLM marking is much more flexible than LLB. So ... is it that you were marked as an LLM or the same as LLBs?
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    (Original post by Notoriety)
    The MA Law is 240 credits. 210 of those credits are taken up by the seven foundation topics, meaning you can take one further 30 credit at level 7. So if my contention is correct that the 210 are doss, you only truly experienced 30 credits max of master's-level content. By the way, undergrads (with permission of their programme director) can do this! So if I am correct, you have as much experience as one of my mates who took master's level financial law in his third year. (Notably, there is no disso requirement for the MA Law. LLMs all do lengthy dissos, and this forms the majority of their mark usually. On Bristol's LLM it's 60 credits (so worth two modules).)

    What do we know about the 210 credits from what you've told us? You sat different exams and completed different assessments. Well, the foundation modules on the LLB are 20 credits and the foundation topics on the MA Law programme are 30. Ditto, my 30 credit company law module had people on it only completing 15 credits and they sat an exam in Jan rather than in May. We covered more content, but nevertheless we were both assessed on term-one content -- the questions were the same. The people who left the module halfway through got similar grades to the rest of us. Different assessments means little.

    If it were true that your assessments, of the same content delivered, were entirely different from the LLBers' (given that core content is pretty much the same at every law school in the UK, so unlikely), that would actually weaken your claim. It is well known to anyone who's studied an LLM that LLM marking is much more flexible than LLB. So ... is it that you were marked as an LLM or the same as LLBs?
    SO you are speaking from anecdotal reference, and I am speaking from actual experience.

    Yet you presume to inform me me about the level of course. One thing you will surely encounter as you continue your transition from student to practice, if you are deemed to be desirable to any firm/set, that practice is a different more formidable beast as compared to study/literary references.

    Your arrogance will not do you well in practice, as no one will want to work with an insufferable bore... or at least not for long... but hey that is a matter for you to contemplate if you so wish.

    My points as previously expressed stand.
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    (Original post by vnupe)
    SO you are speaking from anecdotal reference, and I am speaking from actual experience.

    Yet you presume to inform me me about the level of course. One thing you will surely encounter as you continue your transition from student to practice, if you are deemed to be desirable to any firm/set, that practice is a different more formidable beast as compared to study/literary references.

    Your arrogance will not do you well in practice, as no one will want to work with an insufferable bore... or at least not for long... but hey that is a matter for you to contemplate if you so wish.

    My points as previously expressed stand.
    Ahh, earlier I was a silly little child whose opinion you casually dismissed while you bragged about your background. Now I am telling you that I have experienced undergrad and postgrad law I am an insufferable bore. Uh oh, someone's upset. I thought it was the person on the stand who was supposed to break, not the erudite and eminent barrister examining them!

    And don't presume to tell me there is a difference between books and practice. You thought to positively go out of your way and tell me I am wrong based on what a piece of paper told you was the level of your course. Perhaps influenced by its making you feel special. It was me who looked at the de facto and explained in practice it is the same as any other LLB Grad course.

    Best of luck with your career though; you must be doing quite well for yourself if you spend your Sundays belittling (from your POV) kids on the Internet.
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    (Original post by vnupe)
    Just as I thought, you are spewing nonsense from an uninformed perspective... it is disappointing, especially as you aim to speak with such authority and brio... have you even finished your LLB/BA degree?
    For once, they are talking sense.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    For once, they are talking sense.
    I will ignore the first bit and just pretend you said the latter.

    Tar, J-SP!
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    (Original post by Notoriety)
    I will ignore the first bit and just pretend you said the latter.

    Tar, J-SP!
    .😉.
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    (Original post by Notoriety)
    Ahh, earlier I was a silly little child whose opinion you casually dismissed while you bragged about your background. Now I am telling you that I have experienced undergrad and postgrad law I am an insufferable bore. Uh oh, someone's upset. I thought it was the person on the stand who was supposed to break, not the erudite and eminent barrister examining them!

    And don't presume to tell me there is a difference between books and practice. You thought to positively go out of your way and tell me I am wrong based on what a piece of paper told you was the level of your course. Perhaps influenced by its making you feel special. It was me who looked at the de facto and explained in practice it is the same as any other LLB Grad course.

    Best of luck with your career though; you must be doing quite well for yourself if you spend your Sundays belittling (from your POV) kids on the Internet.
    I will end this here... all my points stand, and do not presume to debate those who only can see anything from their ill conceived irrational perspective.

    My career is going just fine, thanks for asking. Also I do not belittle anyone however I will oppose those who try to invoke an all-knowing narrative.

    I am not moved nor persuaded by your child-like tantrums and irrational logic.

    As previously stated, if you do not change you will be embittered and find yourself displaced, view this as unsolicited advice, or view it however you want.

    I wish you nothing but success as I suspect you will rise to the level you presume you deserve.
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    I just wanted to know Queen Mary or Exeter :c
 
 
 
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