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What laptop should I have for Aerospace Engineering at uni? watch

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    I have a desktop/tower computer thats very capable (2TB hard drive and 8GB RAM) and is not windows 10 (thank god) but i am unlikely to be taking it to uni since its so clunky to transfer
    not only that, but i will be going back home often so it would be transfering it many times in the year and risking damage
    this computer would be ideal for engineering software though (i have tried a few on it and they run very smoothly)

    so i need to buy a laptop, as it doesn't seem convenient to transport the tower computer often,

    now the real question is, what sort of specs should i aim for?
    do most engineering students find they dont need to install software, and hence the laptop only needs to be good for the average usage?
    i dont have a big budget, i would say £300 max, and thats a big stretch. ideal would be £150 - 250.
    also, is windows 10 convenient for engineering software?? im extremely uncertain in buying a windows 10 pc

    any feedback is useful, esp if ur an engineering student urself!!
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    (Original post by Kppppp)
    I have a desktop/tower computer thats very capable (2TB hard drive and 8GB RAM) and is not windows 10 (thank god) but i am unlikely to be taking it to uni since its so clunky to transfer
    not only that, but i will be going back home often so it would be transfering it many times in the year and risking damage
    this computer would be ideal for engineering software though (i have tried a few on it and they run very smoothly)

    so i need to buy a laptop, as it doesn't seem convenient to transport the tower computer often,

    now the real question is, what sort of specs should i aim for?
    do most engineering students find they dont need to install software, and hence the laptop only needs to be good for the average usage?
    i dont have a big budget, i would say £300 max, and thats a big stretch. ideal would be £150 - 250.
    also, is windows 10 convenient for engineering software?? im extremely uncertain in buying a windows 10 pc

    any feedback is useful, esp if ur an engineering student urself!!
    What are you going to be using the laptop for? If you want to use computationally intensive specialist engineering software then you may need something more powerful, and thus may need to allocate a slightly higher budget. But if you just want to use it for convenience, Chrome and Word, then a machine at that price should be fine. You shouldn't need to install any software on your computer as the department will have it all on their own computers.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    What are you going to be using the laptop for? If you want to use computationally intensive specialist engineering software then you may need something more powerful, and thus may need to allocate a slightly higher budget. But if you just want to use it for convenience, Chrome and Word, then a machine at that price should be fine. You shouldn't need to install any software on your computer as the department will have it all on their own computers.
    i know my budget is quite low, so chances of getting a laptop that can handle engineering software is unlikely, but would u say that having the software on your own computer would be more convenient/efficient?? or is it only a mild benefit?
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    (Original post by Kppppp)
    i know my budget is quite low, so chances of getting a laptop that can handle engineering software is unlikely, but would u say that having the software on your own computer would be more convenient/efficient?? or is it only a mild benefit?
    If you can get it on your computer, it can be beneficial depending on how much you're going to use it - which is hard to predict. It's definitely not mandatory, which is the key thing, as the university will provide all of the software and facilities required, so don't feel pressurised to expand your budget.
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    (Original post by Kppppp)
    I have a desktop/tower computer thats very capable (2TB hard drive and 8GB RAM) and is not windows 10 (thank god) but i am unlikely to be taking it to uni since its so clunky to transfer
    not only that, but i will be going back home often so it would be transfering it many times in the year and risking damage
    this computer would be ideal for engineering software though (i have tried a few on it and they run very smoothly)

    so i need to buy a laptop, as it doesn't seem convenient to transport the tower computer often,

    now the real question is, what sort of specs should i aim for?
    do most engineering students find they dont need to install software, and hence the laptop only needs to be good for the average usage?
    i dont have a big budget, i would say £300 max, and thats a big stretch. ideal would be £150 - 250.
    also, is windows 10 convenient for engineering software?? im extremely uncertain in buying a windows 10 pc

    any feedback is useful, esp if ur an engineering student urself!!
    Windows 10 will be fine for engineering software. Also, don't go out buying software licences as the university will likely have either campus-wide/student licences or subsidised licences for sale.

    You shouldn't need an expensive laptop, as the university should have Compute Servers you can access using SSH/PuTTY for computationally intensive tasks. £300 was how much I spent on my laptop (CompSci student) and it was a used ThinkPad T440p.

    I'll move this over to the Laptops subforum too :borat:
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    Pretty much as above, just pick one that suits your non-academic needs, as any academic requirements will be fulfilled by the university's computing services. If you are really unsure, maybe get one with a bit of extra RAM (8-12GB) than you might otherwise. If you need more than this you're probably going to be doing the work at the uni on a dedicated machine anyway...I highly doubt you will need or want to do CFD at home for example maybe a bit of light MATLAB work at worst.
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    Why do you drastically need a laptop? How difficult is it realistically to transport your desktop to uni? Plenty of students do it and while it's a pain for the odd day traveling it balances out when you consider the amount of time you actually spend at uni. A few days faffing around transporting it are worth the half a year you'll actually use it.

    Besides that, your university will have dedicated computers, most likely with open access labs that you can use to get work done. If £300 is pushing your budget then it makes little sense to waste it on a laptop that doesn't fulfill your needs. You're looking at closer to £400 before you're even buying a new laptop worth owning. That said, a 2TB HDD and 8GB of RAM are nothing special, even entry level laptops come with 8GB of RAM nowadays. You'd have to spend more than your budget but odds are you can get something similar to what you've mentioned for reasonably cheap, especially if you go preowned. Unless of course you've got a GPU or high end processor, at which point a similar laptop will cost far more.

    Alternatively, why not make your desktop smaller so that it's more convenient to transport. Unless you've got an unusual setup, odds are you can put your current computer in a smaller case. I'm guessing you've got an ATX sized motherboard, simply buy an ITX size board and an appropriately small case. It'll cost less than £300, you get to take your desktop and it's not much more inconvenient to transport compared to a laptop.

    If you are not going to take your desktop, I recommend waiting until you get to university to see what facilities are available. It makes little sense to waste <£300 on a terrible laptop but once you arrive you might think having your own device is far more preferable to spending all your time in labs or the library.
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    Thank you all for the quick replies!

    In an ideal world I would take my desktop pc, but if I am honest, it is positioned in my room in such a way that it is ridiculously hard to move all the cables. And considering its been in the exact same spot for about 5 years, I'm somewhat hesitant to move it. The main reason I don't want to take it though, is that I don't want to risk damaging it, as it has many of my projects on there.
    I don't know, I suppose I have plenty of time to think about it - like Acsel said, I don't necessarily want to spend some on a laptop if it will only be a laptop for casual use, and if the specs will be unfavourable because of my budget. If I'm honest, I'm not very keen on buying any brand new laptops as the majority are Windows 10.

    The university I plan to go to has a very nice computer lab though, so I wouldn't be unhappy doing the majority of my work there.

    Again, thank you for all the responses and suggestions, I'll come back to reread them and think about what to do some more!!
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    (Original post by Kppppp)
    In an ideal world I would take my desktop pc, but if I am honest, it is positioned in my room in such a way that it is ridiculously hard to move all the cables. And considering its been in the exact same spot for about 5 years, I'm somewhat hesitant to move it. The main reason I don't want to take it though, is that I don't want to risk damaging it, as it has many of my projects on there.
    This is somewhat concerning, if nothing else it's gonna need a damn good clean if you've had it for 5 years and never moved it. And of course damage to files shouldn't be a concern if you are backing things up properly. But otherwise yeah, it's not really in your best interest to buy a laptop.
 
 
 

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