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    Hey guys,

    I know this is really early but I thought I'd set this up for all those of you considering applying to Manchester next year.

    We can discuss stats, the application process requirements and also parts of the Manchester course. Remember Manchester is PBL/Integrated so they do a lot of small group teaching which is supplemented with lectures and early clinical experience. You have weekly PBL sessions, Anatomy (Dissection), and communication sessions.

    I'm a first year med student at Manchester so if any of you have any questions about the uni, the course structure or want and tips regarding your application, feel free to just ask!
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    How much weighing is given to voluntary work and extracurricular at manchester.
    I have heard Manchester uni is quite extracurricular heavy as compared to academics?
    I am year 11 student appearing in GCSE this year, expecting good grades in GCSE but not much on extracurricular side besides DofE silver so far. No sure if I will do gold.
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    (Original post by ZeeVee1)
    How much weighing is given to voluntary work and extracurricular at manchester.
    I have heard Manchester uni is quite extracurricular heavy as compared to academics?
    I am year 11 student appearing in GCSE this year, expecting good grades in GCSE but not much on extracurricular side besides DofE silver so far. No sure if I will do gold.
    Manchester do like to see things beyond just the grades, they’re quite keen on seeing you’ve got the qualities and skills required for Medicine. For Manchester you have to fill out an additional “non-academic form” after you submit your UCAS application. In there you have to write sections under the following headings: Caring role, teamwork, motivation for Medicine, hobbies and interests.

    So whatever you do make sure you have enough to be able to write about these things. Volunteering is good and probably what you’d write mostly about in the “caring role” section. It’s especially good if you an show a long term commitment...at least 6 months, but the longer the better!

    In terms of extracurricular, I’d say don’t worry too much about how many different things you’re doing, but instead just make sure you’ve got enough reflections from whatever you do. I know with DofE you have all the different sections which will all be good in giving you different experiences. Seeing as you’re in Year 11, I would recommend doing NCS this Summer too, it’s a really great experience and you do get to do a lot of teamwork!
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    Thanks.
    And how do they weigh UKCAT. I mean do they have any cut off or they look for individual section scores?
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    (Original post by ZeeVee1)
    Thanks.
    And how do they weigh UKCAT. I mean do they have any cut off or they look for individual section scores?
    They have a cut off score which is set after they receive everyone's scores based on how everyone else performs. If you pass the threshold then you will be invited for interview
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    Thanks for making the thread
    What is it like studying at Manchester? Also, are there many gap year and grad entry applicants? (since I'm not a school leaver)
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    (Original post by medic221)
    Thanks for making the thread
    What is it like studying at Manchester? Also, are there many gap year and grad entry applicants? (since I'm not a school leaver)

    I love Manchester...It's great! I love the variety of teaching sessions, the course structure is very engaging!
    I've written quite a few different posts on my blog (see dp) covering different aspects of studying medicine in Manchester in detail.
    If you go under Medical School, you'll be able to find lots of info, such as the "Week in the life of a med student" series I did and what a typical timetable looks like.

    Yep, there definitely is a lot of students here that aren't school leavers. In my current PBL there's 2 graduates and 1 gap year student (out of 10) if that gives you an idea.

    No worries, you're welcome to ask whatever you'd like!
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    What extracurriculars did you write about and what were your stats 😁
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    What was your interview like?
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    (Original post by slaybae)
    What extracurriculars did you write about and what were your stats 😁

    In the non academic form it’s spilt into sections, so for my caring role I talked about my volunteering at a hospice and a children’s ward. For the teamwork section I wrote about the social action project from the NCS. For hobbies and interests I wrote about a photography project I did, swimming and mentioned my blog
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    (Original post by laura.odion101)
    What was your interview like?
    The Manchester Interview was actually a lot more relaxed and friendly than I thought it would be. It was my first med school interview so I was super nervous, and my first station didn’t actually go brilliantly...but after that the interview went pretty well and really fast!

    I was asked to write about the day in detail for university’s student blog if you’d like to have a read: https://manchesterbmhstudents.wordpr...of-manchester/
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    The 'Medicine with European Studies' course at Manchester particularly appealed to me as I'd like to do medicine, but I don't want to forget my German skills; and I've been torn between medicine or languages as a degree, so it would be great to do both of them together!
    Henceforth, I was wondering if you could give a further insight as to what the 'European studies' programme is like. Is it stressful doing a language with medicine?
    Also, how is the workload like for medicine at Manchester? How often do you get essays?
    Furthermore, how often do you have clinical placements in your first year?
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    Im also doing A levels at NCC. MY GCSES are 4A*s 5As and a C. Is this enough for Manchester?
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    I haven’t taken the European Studies option so I can’t tell you much about how manageable that is. I know that you have 2 language sessions week, which will obviously be on top of your existing timetable for Medicine.

    In terms of the general Medicine workload, over time it becomes more manageable, but of course it takes time to get used to going through a huge amount of content independently every week. You go through a PBL case every week, that includes all the work to do with the lectures, and Anatomy etc.

    You can have a look at a typical timetable I upload here, to see what a week generally looks like: https://lifeofamedic.com/2018/03/09/...st-year-medic/

    Something that’s really good is that every 3 weeks we get a week off, “consolidation week” which is basically there to catch up on everything, so that’s really helpful in getting yourself back on track with everything.

    We don’t have to write essays at all. In terms of assessments, we have them at the end of each semester that we must pass in order to progress on to the next year. We also have 1 test in the middle of each semester...this one doesn't count towards anything, but is just for yourself, to show you how you're doing.
    There's a few different types of exams we have:
    - Semester tests
    - Progress Tests
    - OSCEs
    - PEP

    The semester tests and progress tests are both all multiple choice. The semester test covers content for just that semester, whereas the progress test is content on all 5 years. We have an OSCE at the end of the year which is a practical exam. Here your communication and clinical skills are tested. It's structured like an MMI and you'll go round the different stations doing different tasks.

    We have to do 1 PEP every year. This is a research project. In first year you do this in groups. You create individual reports, which have to be about 3 pages long and you create a research poster together. The report is the only thing we have to do that can be classed as an “essay”.

    In the first semester you have 2 half a day GP placements and 1 full day hospital placement. In the second semester you have 1 half a day GP placement and 2 half a day hopsital placements.

    Sorry for the reaaallyyy long response...but hopefully that’s answered everything
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    (Original post by Stephanieae)
    The 'Medicine with European Studies' course at Manchester particularly appealed to me as I'd like to do medicine, but I don't want to forget my German skills; and I've been torn between medicine or languages as a degree, so it would be great to do both of them together!
    Henceforth, I was wondering if you could give a further insight as to what the 'European studies' programme is like. Is it stressful doing a language with medicine?
    Also, how is the workload like for medicine at Manchester? How often do you get essays?
    Furthermore, how often do you have clinical placements in your first year?
    Answered above
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    (Original post by lifeofamedic)
    I haven’t taken the European Studies option so I can’t tell you much about how manageable that is. I know that you have 2 language sessions week, which will obviously be on top of your existing timetable for Medicine.

    In terms of the general Medicine workload, over time it becomes more manageable, but of course it takes time to get used to going through a huge amount of content independently every week. You go through a PBL case every week, that includes all the work to do with the lectures, and Anatomy etc.

    You can have a look at a typical timetable I upload here, to see what a week generally looks like: https://lifeofamedic.com/2018/03/09/...st-year-medic/

    Something that’s really good is that every 3 weeks we get a week off, “consolidation week” which is basically there to catch up on everything, so that’s really helpful in getting yourself back on track with everything.

    We don’t have to write essays at all. In terms of assessments, we have them at the end of each semester that we must pass in order to progress on to the next year. We also have 1 test in the middle of each semester...this one doesn't count towards anything, but is just for yourself, to show you how you're doing.
    There's a few different types of exams we have:
    - Semester tests
    - Progress Tests
    - OSCEs
    - PEP

    The semester tests and progress tests are both all multiple choice. The semester test covers content for just that semester, whereas the progress test is content on all 5 years. We have an OSCE at the end of the year which is a practical exam. Here your communication and clinical skills are tested. It's structured like an MMI and you'll go round the different stations doing different tasks.

    We have to do 1 PEP every year. This is a research project. In first year you do this in groups. You create individual reports, which have to be about 3 pages long and you create a research poster together. The report is the only thing we have to do that can be classed as an “essay”.

    In the first semester you have 2 half a day GP placements and 1 full day hospital placement. In the second semester you have 1 half a day GP placement and 2 half a day hopsital placements.

    Sorry for the reaaallyyy long response...but hopefully that’s answered everything
    Thank you very much for your response! It was extremely useful!!
    By the way, you know the "consolidation week", does that mean you're off timetable for a week, like you have no lectures nor anatomy?
    Also, how many weeks are there in a semester at Manchester?
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    (Original post by Stephanieae)
    Thank you very much for your response! It was extremely useful!!
    By the way, you know the "consolidation week", does that mean you're off timetable for a week, like you have no lectures nor anatomy?
    Also, how many weeks are there in a semester at Manchester?
    Yep, completely off timetable. The only thing you might have in that week is 1 of your placements, but you might not as well...other than that you’re completely free.

    Semester 1 was from the 18th of Sep to the 8th of December. I don’t know how many weeks that is...
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    (Original post by ahhmed123)
    Im also doing A levels at NCC. MY GCSES are 4A*s 5As and a C. Is this enough for Manchester?
    “We require at least five GCSEs at grade A or A*.
    English Language, Mathematics and at least two science subjects are required at GCSE minimum grade B.”
    From the Manchester med school website.

    As long as you have what it says above you should be fine as Manchester doesn’t rank students based on their GCSE scores. You’ve got the minimum 5 A/A*, so as long as your grade C isn’t in one of the subjects listed above, your grades seem to be enough!
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    What are the clinical experience opportunities over the five years? The information on the med school website is kiiiind of vague - I’m looking to compare between different universities and would like to know how many clinical placements a manchester student would typically have each year. Thank you
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    (Original post by verity_ella)
    What are the clinical experience opportunities over the five years? The information on the med school website is kiiiind of vague - I’m looking to compare between different universities and would like to know how many clinical placements a manchester student would typically have each year. Thank you
    In year 1 we have 3 GP visits, and we also have 3 GP visits in year 2. Over the first 2 years we have a total of 7 hospital visits.

    From year 3-5 you'll be based at a specific hospital, so it'll be a lot more clinically orientated and placement-based. I don't know an awful about how the placements work in years 3-5 as I've only just finished year 1, but looking at the information website that's available to us as students here's what I've found...

    Year 3: "Year 3 starts with 1 week of hospital induction. 5 Clinical Placements will follow. In Blocks 1 and 2 there will be 2 placements of 6 weeks duration each and in Blocks 3, 4 and 5 there will be 3 placements of 4 weeks each. Across the year you will encounter a wide range of patients with multiple conditions. You will all have 1 surgical block and at least 1 complex medicine block over the year."

    Year 4 & 5: You're almost always in a clinical setting and you'll join a medical team whom you'll work alongside. In year 5, you'll undertake a student assistantship, where you undertake the jobs of an FY1 doctor.
 
 
 

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