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Oil and Gas Field Engineer - Good Idea? watch

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    Hey guys,
    Just wondering could anyone answer a few questions for me. I'd love to hear peoples opinions.

    1.Do you think it's a bad idea to go into oil and gas in this day and age? Is there opportunity to have a long career in this sector?

    2.How hard is it to get a job offshore as a mechanical engineer working as a field engineer(e.g with Schlumberger)?

    3.Will the money stay good?

    4.Would the experience from being a field engineer/oil sector experience be valued by any other sectors if I decided to try and enter a new sector with a brighter future? (e.g. try and enter renewable energy, medical companies, automation companies)

    I'd love to work in the north sea for a couple of years and maybe move onto something else less extreme. Thank you for reading.
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    Smack should be able to help you on this matter given his experience/knowledge of the industry.
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    (Original post by trapking)
    Smack should be able to help you on this matter given his experience/knowledge of the industry.
    Thank you, I'd love to hear from him/her!
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    (Original post by MatthewRooney)
    Thank you, I'd love to hear from him/her!
    I think @bloobloobloo has covered things nicely. If you want to become a field engineer in oil & gas, go for it, if you're sure it's what you want to do. I'm assuming you've looked into the offshore life and are okay with travel or spending long periods away from home. What kind of stuff do you want to work with in the field? You've mentioned Schlumberger who do wells/reservoir/subsurface stuff, but other companies in other areas hire field engineers too, but don't always use the term "field engineer".

    Have a backup plan too, though. What stage of your education are you at? What the industry will be like in the future is anyone's guess.
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    @smack Hey there!

    I'm only finishing first year engineering at the moment, so I haven't really found what I like as of yet. I like the idea of sub sea cement testing, negative pressure testing (yes I may have watch deep water horizon , and i understand it's not 100% accurate), drilling also fascinates me. I'd like a challenge and the money wouldn't hurt either.

    I like the idea of 2 weeks on/ 2 weeks off. I hear most graduate field engineers work there way up to more comfortable jobs as well?
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    Sorry, my original post has disappeared!
    here is a repeat
    1. The oil and gas industry is obviously not doing so well at the moment, so finding a job in it will be far more challenging that what it was pre-2013. To put this in perspective, thousands of people lost their jobs in Aberdeen during the downturn so there is a huge excess of experienced people unable to find work – I am at Aberdeen uni and many of the master’s students are people who’ve worked in the industry their whole lives who, sadly, now cannot find work. Having said that, it is not all doom and gloom because the industry is definitely picking up and will continue to be essential for a long time (fossil fuels will support 85% of the global energy requirements in 2035). Therefore, there are still opportunities to have a long career in it
    1. Coming in as a graduate may work to an advantage because companies (like Schlumberger) will still need them to support the company in the future. At the moment companies are still taking on graduates, just fewer than a few years ago. It is likely that if youre successful, the company will support and look after you. My recommendation is to get as much experience as early on as possible – this does not have to technical experience, instead of something like volunteering to show you have a good work ethic. Technical experience will put you at an advantage - research smaller companies for potential summer work in something energy-related, e.g. technical assistant, rather than big ones that are far more competitive and every other student will be applying to.
    1. Money will stay good, generally, oil and gas jobs will always pay higher than other industries.
    1. In order to move into other sectors you need to be able to relate what you’ve done in your current sector to the new one. So for example moving from offshore oil and gas to offshore renewables would (probably) not be too difficult because a lot of the same principles apply, its just different products being considered. I have heard of other professionals moving from oil and gas into nuclear or defence, so I don’t think it would be unreasonable to not be able to switch between industries.

    I hope this helps in some way
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    (Original post by MatthewRooney)
    @smack Hey there!

    I'm only finishing first year engineering at the moment, so I haven't really found what I like as of yet. I like the idea of sub sea cement testing, negative pressure testing (yes I may have watch deep water horizon , and i understand it's not 100% accurate), drilling also fascinates me. I'd like a challenge and the money wouldn't hurt either.

    I like the idea of 2 weeks on/ 2 weeks off. I hear most graduate field engineers work there way up to more comfortable jobs as well?
    Stick in at your degree and see how things are when you are closer to graduating, although it's never too early to begin looking at internships/placements etc. Also look at roles like project engineer, etc. too, and look at all the companies and not just wells and subsurface services ones.

    Also, 2 on 2 off has generally been replaced by 3 on 3 off now, and lots of people who are field engineers go offshore on an ad-hoc basis rather than on a rota. I think most graduate field engineers would likely expect to work their way up into another role, although I'm not really sure what the career structure is like as I don't know many.
 
 
 
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