Turn on thread page Beta

Student sues Anglia Ruskin over "Mickey Mouse" degree watch

    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    (Original post by J-SP)
    No, it really isn’t it.
    I doubt the lecturers would agree with you.


    (Original post by J-SP)
    Your Big 8 is starting to look very shaky then with only 3 meeting the highest standard based on TEF
    Yes, the Big 8 may need a review. Maybe the international ranking, TEF & REF scores and other metrics may help to create a new tier of elite universities.

    The idea still stands, but the members of the group may have to change to truly reflect a new and elite group of universities.
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    How does changing fees reduce the Treasury's revenue? The student loan is independent of the Treasury, although the write-offs aren't.
    You have partially answered the question. The varied fee will result in payment returns and affect Treasury’s revenue.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Wired_1800)
    I doubt the lecturers would agree with you.




    Yes, the Big 8 may need to a review. Maybe the international ranking, TEF & REF scores and other metrics may help to create a new tier of elite universities.

    The idea still stands, but the members of the group may have to change to truly reflect a new and elite group of universities.
    They won’t use external rankings to determine policy, especially where the system is skewed to specific measure not in the government (or students) interest.

    I’m sure the lecturers worried about their pension are most siloed in their views. The reality is there are much bigger issues within universities beyond some of their staff striking.
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    (Original post by J-SP)
    They won’t use external rankings to determine policy, especially where the system is skewed to specific measure not in the government (or students) interest.

    I’m sure the lecturers worried about their pension are most siloed in their views. The reality is there are much bigger issues within universities beyond some of their staff striking.
    Like what issues?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Wired_1800)
    Like what issues?
    To name a few:

    Falling student numbers, both U.K. and EU
    Increased regulation (OfS)
    Impact of research funding due to Brexit
    Retaining staff post Brexit
    Huge pension deficits
    Restructures and redundancies

    Universities have got to ensure they have the short and long term money to pay for the pensions academics are striking for.
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    (Original post by J-SP)
    To name a few:

    Falling student numbers, both U.K. and EU
    Increased regulation (OfS)
    Impact of research funding due to Brexit
    Retaining staff post Brexit
    Huge pension deficits
    Restructures and redundancies

    Universities have got to ensure they have the short and long term money to pay for the pensions academics are striking for.
    I agree.
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shadowdweller)
    I disagree - unis teach you the skills needed for programming, which shouldn't be language specific. Several unis only teach 1 or 2 languages, and I can't imagine any would teach all of them. I'd never used the programs required for Job A that I'm currently working in, but the fact I'd learnt a coding system meant it was quick to pick up; no uni will teach you the systems for every job, but that's not the same as them disadvantaging you, at least from my understanding of the situation you're outlining, apologies if I've misunderstood it.
    Lets put it another way, say we're applying for a job in bar after graduating. One of us does business, the other say, French. The guy doing business in a bar is more likely to get the job.

    My drama studies experience where I studied Shakespeare versus yours when you studied......someone else. Look, the first grad job is for a background job in Macbeth. Again, advantage me.

    Also, in the other example I'd argue that those coding techniques are probably so different that learning one doesn't make the other easier
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Which coding system?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    It's not actually coding systems, since I did Pathology, but we used a lesser known program called QuPath which isn't going to be taken further. We also used some other program instead of SPSS but can't remember what that was.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    • Section Leader
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by That Bearded Man)
    It's not actually coding systems, since I did Pathology, but we used a lesser known program called QuPath which isn't going to be taken further. We also used some other program instead of SPSS but can't remember what that was.
    Ah fair enough. My knowledge of pathology is limited entirely to Silent Witness. Which I rarely watch...

    (Original post by That Bearded Man)
    Lets put it another way, say we're applying for a job in bar after graduating. One of us does business, the other say, French. The guy doing business in a bar is more likely to get the job.
    Not if it's in a touristy area.
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Not if it's in a touristy area.
    Yeah - everyone seems to know about coding around here.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    • Section Leader
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by That Bearded Man)
    Yeah - everyone seems to know about coding around here.
    Mind the edit
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Mind the edit
    i just think it is like a pregnant squirrel eating a sandwich.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Indeed: Manchester, silver....

    Which they seem amazingly pleased to get: "This result acknowledges the tremendous progress our University has made in recent years to bring about significant improvements in the student experience particularly across teaching quality, assessment and feedback. "
    http://www.staffnet.manchester.ac.uk...play/?id=18515
    The amount of management control over academic staff is inversely proportional to the age of the university.

    Academics are quick to to attack any form of management oversight as an attack on academic freedom, but most "management" is simply requiring those who are managed to perform their obligations to the students and the institution,

    Generally speaking Oxford and Cambridge "get away with it" because the governing bodies of their colleges are too small for miscreants to hide.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PQ)
    It was supposed to until Theresa May called a snap election and got scared away from allowing fees to rise with inflation.

    It was also supposed to be used to determine which universities could sponsor visas for international students. Then LSE got a bronze and they got scared.
    Exactly. Now just picture the stupendous effort and cost that universities have incurred implementing TEF and all just on a political whim dreamed up by one of No 10s teenage spads on an internship.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    The amount of management control over academic staff is inversely proportional to the age of the university.

    Academics are quick to to attack any form of management oversight as an attack on academic freedom, but most "management" is simply requiring those who are managed to perform their obligations to the students and the institution,

    Generally speaking Oxford and Cambridge "get away with it" because the governing bodies of their colleges are too small for miscreants to hide.
    Collegial and committee management are probably the least effective management styles around if you need to meet a deadline, build something complicated that works or introduce drastic change. Since most academics abhor all of those things, they feel it's nonetheless the best system for them.

    The real problem in many universities is not that academics wish to govern themselves in a semi-anarchy, but that they think they should also run the administrative side of the university in the same ways.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by J-SP)

    Universities have got to ensure they have the short and long term money to pay for the pensions academics are striking for.
    Universities didn't pay into the scheme for 6 years by agreement with the pension managers, they could start by making good that missing money. Instead, they spent it on shiny new buildings (arguably needed) and vast increases in top management salaries.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Universities didn't pay into the scheme for 6 years by agreement with the pension managers, they could start by making good that missing money. Instead, they spent it on shiny new buildings (arguably needed) and vast increases in top management salaries.
    Indeed, the missing payments were a stupid decision. Money invested elsewhere would be needed for the long-term or wouldn't cover the deficit though.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: March 14, 2018
The home of Results and Clearing

3,058

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year
Poll
A-level students - how do you feel about your results?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.