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    I am an excellent programmer. I know multiple languages (e.g. HTML, CSS, Javascript, Python, C#, Java, Jquery)

    But revising computing theory is so long and boring. But I love programming. Any tips on what I can do to help with computing theory?
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    It might be boring, but a lot of it is about memorising things (particularly when you get to stuff like legal/ethical issues, or memorising the definitions of terminology), so a bit of repetition can help with that. e.g. read through some of the material for an hour or two one week and then try doing it again the next week.

    Maybe just try dedicating one hour per day to writing notes on some subject which you're having difficulty remembering or understanding.

    There's an art to writing notes in a way which helps it stick in your mind; transcriping the content of a textbook or webpage directly onto paper isn't particularly helpful, you need to engage with the material and get it into your mind so that you really understand it. The way to know whether you truly understand a concept is whether you can explain it using plain-english in your own words, without referring back to the original material as if you were attempting to teach somebody who has no previous knowledge.

    Sometimes it can also help to google for things and find alternative explanations - e.g. check the BBC Bitesize website, along with Wikipedia, and maybe wikihow, etc. Reading 3 different explanations of the same topic can often give you a better perspective on something than just reading it from a single textboo.

    Try writing things down in note form with the book and websites closed by using your own words (maybe use bullet-points, diagrams, tables, etc). Anything you write based on your own understanding should sink in far more easily than a bunch of notes copied directly from the original text book. You can then refer back to the book or online pages to check how closely your notes match the things you'd written down.
    If you want to get some good practice in learning binary arithmetic, sign up to the Cisco website for this game: https://learningnetwork.cisco.com/docs/DOC-1803

    Aside from that, see if you can find quizzes, questions and tests online, or try the ones in the book(s) you're using and just keep on practicing. If you've got access to past papers then those are ideal.
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    (Original post by winterscoming)
    It might be boring, but a lot of it is about memorising things (particularly when you get to stuff like legal/ethical issues, or memorising the definitions of terminology), so a bit of repetition can help with that. e.g. read through some of the material for an hour or two one week and then try doing it again the next week.

    Maybe just try dedicating one hour per day to writing notes on some subject which you're having difficulty remembering or understanding.

    There's an art to writing notes in a way which helps it stick in your mind; transcriping the content of a textbook or webpage directly onto paper isn't particularly helpful, you need to engage with the material and get it into your mind so that you really understand it. The way to know whether you truly understand a concept is whether you can explain it using plain-english in your own words, without referring back to the original material as if you were attempting to teach somebody who has no previous knowledge.

    Sometimes it can also help to google for things and find alternative explanations - e.g. check the BBC Bitesize website, along with Wikipedia, and maybe wikihow, etc. Reading 3 different explanations of the same topic can often give you a better perspective on something than just reading it from a single textboo.

    Try writing things down in note form with the book and websites closed by using your own words (maybe use bullet-points, diagrams, tables, etc). Anything you write based on your own understanding should sink in far more easily than a bunch of notes copied directly from the original text book. You can then refer back to the book or online pages to check how closely your notes match the things you'd written down.
    If you want to get some good practice in learning binary arithmetic, sign up to the Cisco website for this game: https://learningnetwork.cisco.com/docs/DOC-1803

    Aside from that, see if you can find quizzes, questions and tests online, or try the ones in the book(s) you're using and just keep on practicing. If you've got access to past papers then those are ideal.
    Love for that..... I'll do that and see if it helps
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