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    Hello,

    I am a second year Civil Engineering student. I have averaged 77.3 percent so far in my degree and I do put a lot of work into my studies.

    However, I don't believe that lectures are a good use of time. Here are some reasons:

    1) Lecturers only read from PowerPoint slides which can be found on Blackboard.

    2) Lecturers only go over the theory and reasoning behind content, as oppose to worked examples, even though we are rarely asked about theory in our exams.

    3) Lectures are recorded, which means that we can access the lecture online at any time if we get stuck.

    4) It's easy to get lost in lectures because the pace of teaching is too quick, which never happens when doing the work in your own time.

    Does anyone else agree?
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    (Original post by jake4198)
    Hello,

    I am a second year Civil Engineering student. I have averaged 77.3 percent so far in my degree and I do put a lot of work into my studies.

    However, I don't believe that lectures are a good use of time. Here are some reasons:

    1) Lecturers only read from PowerPoint slides which can be found on Blackboard.

    2) Lecturers only go over the theory and reasoning behind content, as oppose to worked examples, even though we are rarely asked about theory in our exams.

    3) Lectures are recorded, which means that we can access the lecture online at any time if we get stuck.

    4) It's easy to get lost in lectures because the pace of teaching is too quick, which never happens when doing the work in your own time.

    Does anyone else agree?
    The short answer is that, basically, yes, lots of people agree with you. Even on TSR, this is quite commonly asked I believe. That's not, of course, to say that they don't work for anyone, just that, as a method, they are not a universally effective method of teaching content. I also studied engineering and agree that going through worked examples was, for me at least, the most effective method of learning how to do problems.

    I have been reading some extracts from the IET's New Approaches to Engineering Education (you should be able to find it online, but if not I can try and dig it out) and what you are saying is being discussed - it was recognised by some that traditional lectures may not be the best method of delivering content or providing teaching - but whether it will actually gain traction (outside of a few isolated examples of quite different models of delivering engineering education at university) is another thing.
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    I’m doing engineering and yeah for some classes, lectures are a waste of time and looking at the notes online + doing examples is much more effective. However there’s still some other classes in which lectures can help you understand certain concepts better. It depends on the lecturer and how passionate they really are about teaching the content.
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    (Original post by jake4198)
    Hello,

    I am a second year Civil Engineering student. I have averaged 77.3 percent so far in my degree and I do put a lot of work into my studies.

    However, I don't believe that lectures are a good use of time. Here are some reasons:

    1) Lecturers only read from PowerPoint slides which can be found on Blackboard.

    2) Lecturers only go over the theory and reasoning behind content, as oppose to worked examples, even though we are rarely asked about theory in our exams.

    3) Lectures are recorded, which means that we can access the lecture online at any time if we get stuck.

    4) It's easy to get lost in lectures because the pace of teaching is too quick, which never happens when doing the work in your own time.

    Does anyone else agree?
    I don't disagree with your points. Recorded lectures are great, as you can watch them at your own pace, pause to make notes, and rewind if you get stuck. In the future, I think more unis will move to a model where students watch recorded lectures online, and then most physical contact time is more like seminars/workshops i.e. more interactive and discussion based.

    I do think there are a few reasons to go to lectures (1) you can ask questions, especially at the end, if you need to (2) It's a good way to meet other students and talk about the course (3) It's good for lecturers to know your face e.g. if you want help with an assignment or if you want them as a dissertation supervisor next year etc. However, this probably isn't a reason to go to every lecture!

    I have seen lecturers show evidence linking lecture attendance with exam performance. There's a correlation, but I think that it's probably just the more motivated students go to lectures (mostly) and also do well in their exams.

    I do think lectures are sort of outdated, but a lot of people measure their value for money from the uni in terms of "contact time". Mass lectures are the cheapest/easiest way to up contact time for students, so unis like to have lectures you can physically go to, rather than just recordings.

    If lectures don't work for you and your uni doesn't record attendance, then I would just stop going!
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    It is surprising how often I see #1 crop up.

    I rarely use PowerPoint, but when I have, there is no way you could get a measure of the whole hour from it. Reading from a PP is lazy and inefficient. No excuse for it.
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    (Original post by jake4198)
    Hello,

    I am a second year Civil Engineering student. I have averaged 77.3 percent so far in my degree and I do put a lot of work into my studies.

    However, I don't believe that lectures are a good use of time. Here are some reasons:

    1) Lecturers only read from PowerPoint slides which can be found on Blackboard.

    2) Lecturers only go over the theory and reasoning behind content, as oppose to worked examples, even though we are rarely asked about theory in our exams.

    3) Lectures are recorded, which means that we can access the lecture online at any time if we get stuck.

    4) It's easy to get lost in lectures because the pace of teaching is too quick, which never happens when doing the work in your own time.

    Does anyone else agree?
    CompSci here.

    I agree with all your points.
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    What uni do you go to?

    Do you have anything else other than lectures? I haven't yet started uni, just want to know. How do you then know what you're supposed to do if you don't go to lectures?
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    Well mine are all monitored, you don't you will get kicked out. Clearly uni/subject differences maybe.
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    in my experience i skipped pretty much all seminars and went to about 80% lectures and i almost missed out on a 2:1. why cos i missed out on coursework and exam help sessions. and at end i had to study based on how i saw fit - only on lectures and book nothing else no notes
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    I personally find it difficult to learn just by reading through powerpoint slides because its a lazy and passive way to study.

    Whereas in lectures, the stuff is explained and they can easily go over the bits you're not sure on. There's usually group work incorporated too so by discussing it with coursemates, you can understand more and think about the topic from various perspectives. It also makes sure i actually try to focus incase i randomly get picked to answer questions.
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    I disagree with some points.

    But usually, my uni lecturers rarely used pp. And if they did, it would be a few lines and then they'd talk about what was on that slide in great detail and length.

    My uni also ruled out video lectures because of the issues with attendance.

    I mean, some lecturers are lazy and will just read from a pp which is shameful. If any lecturers did that, I'd complain. It is so hard to even focus when it's a 2-3hr lecture and all the lecturer does is talk at you in the most monotonous way.
 
 
 

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