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    Hello I’m in a situation where I would like to do a physics degree, but I’m unsure if I could do it. And would like to hear from anyone that might have insight into part time studying of physics.

    I’m an artist, and also work a flexible job. My rent is minimal due to living as a property guardian. My outgoing total rent+ bills and living expenses are about £300 a month.

    So I think I can afford the course. My only concern is just how much work is needed. Do you work daily or can you do 2 or 3 full days a week?

    Or a mix of a few evenings and one full day? Wondering peoples experiences.

    My art will probably take me to Japan in 2 or three years. I understand i’ll Be able to continue studies if I do go. As I’m hoping to be there for one year. (My current learning schedule I do at least one hour of drawing a day, and about 30 mins Japanese)

    I’m single and 33 years old, not wanting a family of my own so the financial commitment and time commitment seems quite possible, as I know people work full time have families and still manage to study a degree part time, just not sure how busy the lives of people that study physics are.

    Kind regards
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    16-18 hours a week is the recommended, but it is fairly liberal.

    Numerous people on my course commit 3 days to study, some work 7 days a week and study for a few evenings. It is subjective, but drawing up a timetable would not be a bad idea. You could gauge how many free hours you have every week.
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    (Original post by Phillip Banks)
    16-18 hours a week is the recommended, but it is fairly liberal.

    Numerous people on my course commit 3 days to study, some work 7 days a week and study for a few evenings. It is subjective, but drawing up a timetable would not be a bad idea. You could gauge how many free hours you have every week.
    Ah great, thanks for this. I just found out too that even though I got. Degree and had a small student loan before, I can most likely get a student loan for part time study of physics deadline for loan application end of March. I’m going to apply, see how it goes this first year. Do as you say draw up a time table. Cheers for the thought.
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    (Original post by Markweb)
    Ah great, thanks for this. I just found out too that even though I got. Degree and had a small student loan before, I can most likely get a student loan for part time study of physics deadline for loan application end of March. I’m going to apply, see how it goes this first year. Do as you say draw up a time table. Cheers for the thought.
    Yes, as you've found part time STEM courses are funded by SFE even as second degrees. I would note, the main thing you probably need to keep an eye on is maths ability. It may be worth when you put together a timetable setting aside half an hour or so every day just to do some maths problems of the appropriate level - it's much easier if you constantly work at it and don't take a "break" so to speak
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Yes, as you've found part time STEM courses are funded by SFE even as second degrees. I would note, the main thing you probably need to keep an eye on is maths ability. It may be worth when you put together a timetable setting aside half an hour or so every day just to do some maths problems of the appropriate level - it's much easier if you constantly work at it and don't take a "break" so to speak
    A very good point to note. Do you have any book reccomendations for maths practice that are good enough to prepare for a start in physics?
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    (Original post by Markweb)
    A very good point to note. Do you have any book reccomendations for maths practice that are good enough to prepare for a start in physics?
    It depends somewhat on your background/level. I have a few suggestions for post A-level/degree level, but before that not really as much.

    I did use mathsrevision,net (which has since changed URL, but I believe redirects) for some A-level standard material, but it doesn't have a great number of examples - it's hand for refreshing the basic concepts though. You might find asking in the A-levels/GCSEs forums as applicable for maths revision recommendations.

    For post A-level, a good cheap option is Schaum's Outline of Advanced Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists, which contains tons of examples for pretty much the vast majority of maths you'll cover in a Physics course. It's not so great for learning but it is fantastic for revision/practice problems - plus it's like £10-20 depending where you buy it. I think some of the earlier sections should be accessible to A-level students though, so once you're comfortable with the A-level material it may be worth trying your hand starting off with that, and then picking it up as you cover the relevant topics in the modules.

    There are probably some Schaum's outlines of the A-level standard content, but they tend more in line with US curricula (the university level material is fairly similarly presented, but the high school/6th form standard stuff is a bit different) so your mileage may vary. Also I'm loathe to "over-recommend" the Schaum's outlines, as while they're great for practice problems as above you can't really learn from them and don't replace traditional learning resources as such...
 
 
 
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