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    I would really like to do a degree in computer science; however, I know the teachers for A-level computer science aren't very good after having them for GCSE, so am planning on doing Maths, Further Maths, Physics and chemistry for A level.

    How good would these options be for a degree in computers science?
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    Fine. The maths is very good.

    Any uni you pick for Computer Science will have its own ideas as to what language to teach you first and it probably won't be what you used for A-level.
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    (Original post by hugebrain)
    I would really like to do a degree in computer science; however, I know the teachers for A-level computer science aren't very good after having them for GCSE, so am planning on doing Maths, Further Maths, Physics and chemistry for A level.

    How good would these options be for a degree in computers science?
    CS A-Level is not important. Mathematics is far more important and it's good that you're taking FM as well as Mathematics :borat:
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    I'm pretty sure most unis don't mind if you don't have prior experience of Computer Science. A strong maths base and physics are required so I'd say your options are pretty good! I'm planning to do the same options next year: Computer Science instead of Chemistry though. All the best!
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    (Original post by hugebrain)
    I would really like to do a degree in computer science; however, I know the teachers for A-level computer science aren't very good after having them for GCSE, so am planning on doing Maths, Further Maths, Physics and chemistry for A level.

    How good would these options be for a degree in computers science?
    Hmmmmmm.

    I do CS but the only reason why I take it at A level is because I dislike chemistry.

    I mean, you can definetly get into computer science at University with Maths, FM chemistry and physics.
    But I recommend that you do some programming in your spare time. Also, make sure that you learn to program in OOP as you will probably only program in OOP when are going to do CS at uni.


    However, you can alternatively do physics at university and then apply for CS related jobs (e.g programmer) after you graduated. It is very doable and tech companies love recruiting physics/maths graduates.

    A family member who works as a senior programmer said that in his company, the vast majority of his coleagues got a maths/physics degree at uni.

    So please do not fall into the trap where people believe that you would need to CS at uni if you want a career in CS, thats not the case. Then again, that is something to think about later on.
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    As far as I'm aware nearly all universities teach CompSci to students as if it's their first time reading the subject, so it's rarely if ever required at A-Level. The students who are completely new to the subject will have a lot more work to do in order to keep up in their first year though.

    Being able to spend 2 years studying CS at A-Level will make your CS degree much easier in the first year, and possibly some of the second year too, because a lot of the material will be the same or similar.

    Remember that University is a lot more focused on self-study than A-Level or GCSE, so most of the things you'll learn at university will be things you teach yourself in your own time anyway. University lecturers are there for support and to provide lectures/materials, and to answer questions if you go to them, but you shouldn't expect anywhere near the same level of contact or direct tuition from university lecturers as you'll have become used to from teachers during your GCSEs.

    So while taking it at A-level may mean you'll need to spend a lot of time teaching things to yourself, the reality is that things won't be that much different at degree level. One positive about self-studying Computer Science is that the internet is overflowing with a lot of good free learning resources on the subject, so it's actually a good one for self-teaching, whether you're doing that for a degree or for A-Level.
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    (Original post by savage_queen)
    I'm pretty sure most unis don't mind if you don't have prior experience of Computer Science. A strong maths base and physics are required so I'd say your options are pretty good! I'm planning to do the same options next year: Computer Science instead of Chemistry though. All the best!
    Not required really. Just to be clear:

    A-Level Maths may be required (see the sticky at the top of this forum) or may not. It is useful though for CS.

    A-Level Physics/Further Maths fall under "nice to have" not "need to have".

    Depending on where you apply you not be required to have maths or physics A-Levels at all.
 
 
 
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