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    This is my first post, so be gentle

    Im a first year biochemistry student and im deciding wether or not to drop out, here are the factors;

    1 - I don't like my course - I averaged 83% in semester one but I honestly didn't try that hard. The content is not enjoyable and I only spend 25% actually studying biochemistry, 75% of the time is spent doing sport science and evolution

    2 - Social - I haven't made any good friends, I've tried sport and enjoy what I've done so far however i'm in a flat with 4 other people, all at least 5 years older than me who don't do anything but sit in their rooms. I am also alone in lectures and feel like I am going crazy.

    3 - I have moved from Bristol to a small campus university - my boyfriend, family and school friends are 100 miles away

    However, I do have accommodation sorted for next year and I don't want to screw over the other people in our house share.

    Do I stick with it and hope it gets better, or pursue other areas ???
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    (Original post by Jack.s_23)
    This is my first post, so be gentle

    Im a first year biochemistry student and im deciding wether or not to drop out, here are the factors;

    1 - I don't like my course - I averaged 83% in semester one but I honestly didn't try that hard. The content is not enjoyable and I only spend 25% actually studying biochemistry, 75% of the time is spent doing sport science and evolution

    2 - Social - I haven't made any good friends, I've tried sport and enjoy what I've done so far however i'm in a flat with 4 other people, all at least 5 years older than me who don't do anything but sit in their rooms. I am also alone in lectures and feel like I am going crazy.

    3 - I have moved from Bristol to a small campus university - my boyfriend, family and school friends are 100 miles away

    However, I do have accommodation sorted for next year and I don't want to screw over the other people in our house share.

    Do I stick with it and hope it gets better, or pursue other areas ???

    You can either drop out now or if you have the chance of decent exam results, then leave after end of first year.

    With student finance then you get a gift year, s you can still get funding for 1 full degree elsewhere assuming you havent used any other finance for HE before.

    That could get you on a better course and a more sociable uni?

    Friends is a bit pot luck and you have to make efforts outside just your flat mates. the situation could change, but its up to you to decide whether you continue and estimate the likely path of events i.e social life and course direction.

    Personally if my marks were good enough, then id find a different course elsewhere. No point being unhappy for the next two years or doing a subject that doesnt interest you. Only you can make that decision and you may or may not find a better course plus better friends.

    With the accommodation, then you just find a replacement.
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    with regards to your points...

    1. If you can get 83% without trying then clearly you are intelligent HOWEVER as you get further through your degree it becomes more and more important that you enjoy what you're doing. So much work will be independent that if you don't have the motivation then regardless of how clever you are, you're gonna struggle. What are the modules like for second and third year? Are there modules you can see yourself enjoying?

    2. I'm not friends with the same people now as I was in first year. You change, your friends change. You meet new people. I know everyone says to join societies and stuff but honestly it is true. Do you work in groups or labs and seminars? Chat to people there, there's probably at least one person you'll find you get on with.

    3. It sucks being far away from family and friends My best advice is to talk to them regularly, keep reminders of them (like photos, little presents they've got you etc) and let them know you miss them. I'm half that distance away from home but I still struggle.


    Some other thinking points- why did you choose Biochem? Is there a specific job route you want? Do you think a different course would help or would you end up facing the same problem of not enjoying the course?

    Also, I haven't looked into it myself but is it possible to transfer unis? If you finish this year and then find another course that suits you better

    Only you know if right or wrong is dropping out (trust me, I'm in the same boat! I wish we could just meditate and emerge in some enlightened state and know what to do!). I've found that people generally do have an opinion on whether you should stay or go- even if they are supportive regardless, I've found that some people definitely seem in favour of one option, so keep in mind that it is your decision. You have to ask yourself if you can stick with it for 2 more years. Talk to your tutor, if not for advice then just to let them know where you're at. They can point you in the direction of student services that can help. And like other people have said, consider your finances! You could leave now and still totally fund a 3 year degree.

    Best of luck, I'm interested to know what you decide!
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    (Original post by Jack.s_23)
    I only spend 25% actually studying biochemistry, 75% of the time is spent doing sport science and evolution
    This sounds like a poor biochemistry course as stated, although you may be misinterpreting the scope of biochemistry. Metabolism and metabolic pathways are pretty common areas to cover in biochemistry, so if this is what you mean by "sport science" then you may just have misinterpreted the nature of the subject. If you prefer to be more chemistry focused, you might find a single/joint honours course including Chemistry more to your liking. You will inevitably cover some aspects of biochemistry in a Chemistry degree, and depending on the course may be able to specialise more or less into it...

    In either case, it's far better to leave sooner and then reevaluate where you stand than later, due to SFE entitlement issues. At worst now you would just have used your "gift" year and will still be able to funded for the full length of whatever course you pursue. If you wait, then decide you do want to leave this course in your second year, you'll likely have to pay at least one year of tuition fees out of pocket on the new course.

    Some perhaps slightly more blunt words on the social aspects...

    Spoiler:
    Show


    On the social side, this is really sort of down to you. You can't necessarily expect your flatmates to provide you a social life without you doing anything. If you want to socialise more you just need to get out there and get to know people - on your course or otherwise. On your old friends and boyfriend, this is really inevitable and just a fact of life. You'll probably end up moving several times in your life, to pursue degrees, jobs, what have you...it's fairly unlikely you'll maintain long term friendships and relationships from school simply because the nature of school is that you have to socialise with all these other people you're thrown in with.

    As you grow older and mature you'll realise you have the prerogative to be selective in who you spend time with - as will they, and this will lead to people growing apart. If you find they don't make the effort to keep in touch while you're at uni a mere 100 miles away, do you think the relationships (social or otherwise) are going to survive years of living apart, possibly much larger distances and even timezone differences, etc, etc.

    In terms of living away from home, this affects everyone in different ways. Inevitably it's hard for most students who have lived their whole lives with their families (and often with the same friends in the same region) to adjust, but it does get easier. This, at least, is likely to improve regardless of where you go. However if you do have very close ties with your family, you may prefer to study somewhere closer to home (i.e. Bristol). However beware this may simply be a crutch for you, and you may find, long term, you regret or resent doing so if you aren't able to achieve your aspirations without leaving Bristol (or the broader region around it).


    ...the tl;dr being that changing uni is probably not going to make a difference on those points - even potentially if you move closer to home.
 
 
 

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