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    My GCSE Grades were as followed: 4A*, 3A, 2B and 2 CI managed to get a A* in maths, A in both biology and chemistry, and a B for EnglishI was just wondered if my chances of getting into med school are significantly lower due to my GCSE grades.(I have looked at entry requirements for all the universities in the UK and I meet the requirements in terms of GCSE grades,however I can imagine that most med students have a even stronger GCSE profile of mainly A*)I am targeted AAA for A-levels and I've done about 4 hospital placements, a week at a care home, volunteered for 6 months at the hospital.Does anyone have any personal experiences of getting into med school with lower than average GCSE Grades.Thank you
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    I’m a 2018 applicant with similar GCSE results. I went to a very low performing state school with a less than 50% pass rate for maths and English, some universities will take this into account so if that’s your case as well check out any widening participation stuff they have going on.

    Make sure you do well in your UKCAT and have a great personal statement. Do research on where to apply to uni, stay away from GCSE heavy med schools, go for those who weight UKCAT/personal statement more heavily and A level predictions if you can get them pushed up any higher. For example, Liverpool score an A and an A* at GCSE with the same 2 points, and other med schools will have less emphasis on GCSE grades too.

    The best thing you can do is strengthen all other parts of your application and be realistic. Medicine is already very competitive, you don’t want to waste choices applying to places that weight GCSE results heavily including Oxbridge. In terms of being realistic, I knew my application was not the strongest and many applicants will have better stats - accept that the process may be 2 years for you (i.e. you may have to reapply the next year round) and expect rejections - even those with the strongest applications get them.

    Good luck
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    (Original post by jsg9)
    I’m a 2018 applicant with similar GCSE results. I went to a very low performing state school with a less than 50% pass rate for maths and English, some universities will take this into account so if that’s your case as well check out any widening participation stuff they have going on.

    Make sure you do well in your UKCAT and have a great personal statement. Do research on where to apply to uni, stay away from GCSE heavy med schools, go for those who weight UKCAT/personal statement more heavily and A level predictions if you can get them pushed up any higher. For example, Liverpool score an A and an A* at GCSE with the same 2 points, and other med schools will have less emphasis on GCSE grades too.

    The best thing you can do is strengthen all other parts of your application and be realistic. Medicine is already very competitive, you don’t want to waste choices applying to places that weight GCSE results heavily including Oxbridge. In terms of being realistic, I knew my application was not the strongest and many applicants will have better stats - accept that the process may be 2 years for you (i.e. you may have to reapply the next year round) and expect rejections - even those with the strongest applications get them.

    Good luck
    ahh thank you so much! where are you thinking of applying
 
 
 

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