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Why don't universities consider A*A*B = A*AA watch

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    Assuming the main subjects are at A* grade, why isn't it equal? It'd probably take the same time and effort to get either, and IMO, the A* and A discrepancy is bigger than any other grade, because you're close to the mark limit, so then there's the argument that A*A*B is harder, particularly for humanities.

    Specialisation is also prominent in the UK curriculum, as you only study one subject (usually), yet students get punished if they don't have an A grade in an irrelevant subject, but a better grade in a relevant subject??!

    Graduate schemes tend to consider them equal, why not universities? I assume it's just to reduce applications.

    *** I know some do e.g. Bristol, but a fair number don't
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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    Assuming the main subjects are at A* grade, why isn't it equal? It'd probably take the same time and effort to get either, and IMO, the A* and A discrepancy is bigger than any other grade, because you're close to the mark limit, so then there's the argument that A*A*B is harder, particularly for humanities.

    Specialisation is also prominent in the UK curriculum, as you only study one subject (usually), yet students get punished if they don't have an A grade in an irrelevant subject, but a better grade in a relevant subject??!

    Graduate schemes tend to consider them equal, why not universities? I assume it's just to reduce applications.

    *** I know some do e.g. Bristol, but a fair number don't

    Because it isnt and they prefer strengths to be balances according to their own ideas, than unbalanced. Not many top unis use UCAS points. they can always fall back on it.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Because it isnt and they prefer strengths to be balances according to their own ideas, than unbalanced. Not many top unis use UCAS points. they can always fall back on it.
    Sorry, I should have said equivalent.

    What's your opinion on someone being declined for an A*AA maths course, having A*A* in Maths and Further Maths, but a B in Music(happened on this forum)?
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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    Sorry, I should have said equivalent.

    What's your opinion on someone being declined for an A*AA maths course, having A*A* in Maths and Further Maths, but a B in Music(happened on this forum)?
    Thems the rules. You know before you start. Some years they might make it other years they might prefer the one with Physics. or extenuatings.
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    Probably cuz the jump from A to A* is smaller than the jump from B to A, idk though.
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    Because a B is not a good enough grade for someone who should be aiming for AAA or A*AA. It shows lack of revision and preparation. Extra A*s are just a bonus but they don't make your B any better. It's still just a B.
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    (Original post by Radioactivedecay)
    Probably cuz the jump from A to A* is smaller than the jump from B to A, idk though.
    Really? I think it's the biggest? You can't make many mistakes if you're trying to get an A* + in humanities, examiner's a reluctant as to give one
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Because a B is not a good enough grade for someone who should be aiming for AAA or A*AA. It shows lack of revision and preparation. Extra A*s are just a bonus but they don't make your B any better. It's still just a B.
    An A is just an A though, according to what you said.

    And the preparation + revision time would be comparable between A*A*B and A*AA - that's why their Tarrif is the same.

    And comparing AAA to A*A*B is silly, obviously the latter would be harder to get in that situation, assuming equal ability across all three subjects.

    There's also a huge drop off in A* grades relative to getting A or B in facilitating subjects. (Not so much in niche subjects for some reason).

    It can't really be considered a bonus anymore in alot of cases, since its integrated into the reqs of top unis - initially it wasn't.

    And mentioned earlier - huge drop off in subjects like chemistry, maths, biology for A* grade
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    I mean my offer from Birmingham for theoretical physics was A*A*B and A*AA would have counted as having missed the offer interestingly, so rarely it can happen the other way round.

    Likewise my offer for Cambridge is A*A*AB so if I get A*AAA I'll have missed my offer, as they're more concerned about me getting two A*s than my fourth a level, so it definitely also happens the other way.
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    (Original post by aesthete1)
    I mean my offer from Birmingham for theoretical physics was A*A*B and A*AA would have counted as having missed the offer interestingly, so rarely it can happen the other way round.

    Likewise my offer for Cambridge is A*A*AB so if I get A*AAA I'll have missed my offer, as they're more concerned about me getting two A*s than my fourth a level, so it definitely also happens the other way.
    Thanks for posting, that's really interesting to hear.

    Good luck with Camb.
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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    An A is just an A though, according to what you said.

    And the preparation + revision time would be comparable between A*A*B and A*AA - that's why their Tarrif is the same.

    And comparing AAA to A*A*B is silly, obviously the latter would be harder to get in that situation, assuming equal ability across all three subjects.

    There's also a huge drop off in A* grades relative to getting A or B in facilitating subjects. (Not so much in niche subjects for some reason).

    It can't really be considered a bonus anymore in alot of cases, since its integrated into the reqs of top unis - initially it wasn't.

    And mentioned earlier - huge drop off in subjects like chemistry, maths, biology for A* grade

    I think it shows you haven't balanced your time effectively if you're getting A* and B. And I was talking more about AAA entry requirements, yes A*A*B should be allowed but unfortunately still doesn't really meet the requirements because you shouldn't be getting a B in that subject.
    My personal opinion is that A*A*B should be sufficient but I don't think you can really argue with universities who do reject students with it.
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    I'm guessing that the reason isn't so much focused around grad schemes as much as the university not wanting a student to neglect the third subject. A-levels are fairly terrible for preparing for you uni in the sense that uni involves balancing a lot more subjects/modules at the same time (minimum 4 - possibly 5, 6 or more). They want to see that you can keep all plates spinning at the same time If you can't balance a third subject on top of your entirely empty A-level school years, you're fairly ****, and aren't that well prepared for a demanding course.

    I'm also guessing that there's an element of behavioural incentives here. A*A*B allows you to lack off for that third subject owing to how easy it is to get a low B in anything. By contrast, the university knows that it is possible that, with a bit more of a nudge, you can do better and get an A* instead of an A for your second subject. Hence, I'm guessing that they want you to simultaneously push up the B to an A, while knowing that there's a decent chance that you'll get an A* in your second subject anyway, because you're fairly strong at it. A*A*A is better for both you and the uni than A*A*B.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I think it shows you haven't balanced your time effectively if you're getting A* and B. And I was talking more about AAA entry requirements, yes A*A*B should be allowed but unfortunately still doesn't really meet the requirements because you shouldn't be getting a B in that subject.
    My personal opinion is that A*A*B should be sufficient but I don't think you can really argue with universities who do reject students with it.
    Fair enough, I wouldn't argue with them If that's what the conditions of what is more or less a contract is.

    The above poster also shows that people with A*AA can get discriminated too. I guess it makes sense for certain subjects.

    It could be just a bad exam or two, rather than timing
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    I think the main reason is the universities/courses asking for A*A*A/A*AA are the ones most likely to receive many applications (in fact largely the high grade requirements are due to that very reason), and so they don't need to consider those who miss that mark.

    In fact it largely boils down to the entry requirements = popularity as for most courses, it wouldn't make a difference as stated. However, the amount of time that would be required to assess every application which fell within these broader "near miss" parameters would require unreasonable time and expense for the admissions teams. Thus, it is necessary to be strict for them...
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    (Original post by Kyber Ninja)
    Fair enough, I wouldn't argue with them If that's what the conditions of what is more or less a contract is.

    The above poster also shows that people with A*AA can get discriminated too. I guess it makes sense for certain subjects.

    It could be just a bad exam or two, rather than timing
    Yeah I know. My mate needed AAA for Durham, he got A*A*B. The B wasn't even in a subject related to the course. Also the course wasn't even that competitive, wasn't medicine or anything. They took about 3 days to decide whether they would accept or reject him and eventually they rejected him. By this point it was too late to try and get into any other decent universities so he had to take a gap year. Fair enough if they wanted to reject him because of the B but it was ridiculous how long they took to decide.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    I think the main reason is the universities/courses asking for A*A*A/A*AA are the ones most likely to receive many applications (in fact largely the high grade requirements are due to that very reason), and so they don't need to consider those who miss that mark.

    In fact it largely boils down to the entry requirements = popularity as for most courses, it wouldn't make a difference as stated. However, the amount of time that would be required to assess every application which fell within these broader "near miss" parameters would require unreasonable time and expense for the admissions teams. Thus, it is necessary to be strict for them...
    Just realised how painful the administration would be for qualifcations that were not A Levels.

    Here's to a Robot future.
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    (Original post by JohanGRK)
    I'm guessing that the reason isn't so much focused around grad schemes as much as the university not wanting a student to neglect the third subject. A-levels are fairly terrible for preparing for you uni in the sense that uni involves balancing a lot more subjects/modules at the same time (minimum 4 - possibly 5, 6 or more). They want to see that you can keep all plates spinning at the same time If you can't balance a third subject on top of your entirely empty A-level school years, you're fairly ****, and aren't that well prepared for a demanding course.

    I'm also guessing that there's an element of behavioural incentives here. A*A*B allows you to lack off for that third subject owing to how easy it is to get a low B in anything. By contrast, the university knows that it is possible that, with a bit more of a nudge, you can do better and get an A* instead of an A for your second subject. Hence, I'm guessing that they want you to simultaneously push up the B to an A, while knowing that there's a decent chance that you'll get an A* in your second subject anyway, because you're fairly strong at it. A*A*A is better for both you and the uni than A*A*B.
    You should be a philosopher, not a lawyer .

    Though at university, you study one subject, even if it has multiple modules. If we refer back to the maths example with A*A*B in FM and Music, you'd bet that student would be more prepared than the A*AA student? He'd happy churn through the hardcore maths work but couldn't be assed with music? Could you not also make the depth arguement for university as well as the breadth? A* would help (a bit) with preparation for the depth.

    Tbh, I think it is down to limiting competition and workload rather than anything, and the reason IBs or some law firms don't care is that they just ask you to list your total UCAS points from your best three.

    That would be cheeky to reject, just because they thought you were a lazy fok.

    The uni just want my cash at the end of the day, the reason they ask for high grades is to make sure I can cope with getting ****ed so I can continue giving them cash.

    Also getting tired of people saying my 3A* and 1B <2A*, 2A just because it doesn't look as nice ffs
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    I missed my AAA offer with A*A*BB and didn't get in. I was gutted as I missed out on the last A by less than 1 UMS point but it was what it was. I missed my grade and others got more consistent grades. I'd guess if there were many places left after the people meeting offers I'd have likely got one but there obviously wasn't. That's life. The uni made an offer and while I did try and target my revision appropriately (I worked waaay harder on subject 3) I didn't manage it. I don't think going from an A->A* in Psychology was equivalent to ahcieving an B->A in Mathematics.
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    (Original post by doodle_333)
    I missed my AAA offer with A*A*BB and didn't get in. I was gutted as I missed out on the last A by less than 1 UMS point but it was what it was. I missed my grade and others got more consistent grades. I'd guess if there were many places left after the people meeting offers I'd have likely got one but there obviously wasn't. That's life. The uni made an offer and while I did try and target my revision appropriately (I worked waaay harder on subject 3) I didn't manage it. I don't think going from an A->A* in Psychology was equivalent to ahcieving an B->A in Mathematics.
    Meh, it's whatever the uni wants and A*A*BB>AAA. AAA in 4 A Level form is AABB.

    They just can't be assed more than anything

    Also, what course at what uni? I feel like I see so many people getting into medicine, law/top unis while missing offers
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    A*A*B means you partially understand one subject whilst you understand the other two subjects perfectly. A*AA means you understand all your subjects to a high degree. Very different!

    Its quite a shallow observation but elite universities get wayyy more applications than there are places so they afford to be superficial about things like that. Though if you have extenuating circumstances they will see A*A*B = A*AA. I've seen a few cambridge folk with AAB.
 
 
 
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