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    I have recently visited both Oxford and Cambridge and I fell in love with Oxford. realistically, is it worth it to apply? I have 5 a and 5 a* GCSE grades and I am predicted 4 As at AS and hopefully, that will carry through to a level. I have the Oxford prospectus and strangely, the entry requirements are only AAA whereas UCL and LSE are A*AA. I know that most people in Oxford have well over 8 A*s at GCSE and amazing a levels. will the 5A*s I have carry me through? or should I save one of my 5 for a more attainable uni?
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    The answer to any question that goes along the lines of "I really want X, should I try for X?" is always yes, all the more so if trying costs you nothing.

    It's simply not true that most people at Oxford have well over 8 A*s. Good grades are the prerequisite; they get your application considered but they aren't everything, and it's often the interview that sees you through. Sometimes a demonstration of exceptional interest and aptitude can compensate for bad grades.

    You might find this thread useful to refer to for an indicative grade profile. You will note that 2 individuals obtained offers with a single C at AS-Level.

    As for UCL and LSE, they have to set the grades bar slightly higher simply because they don't do interviews and thus have a lot less information about candidates to make decisions on - LSE doesn't even bother with the LNAT. They also tend to be flooded with international applicants compared to other UK schools and so have less resources to spend on each decision.

    On the other hand, a cowardly, too-afraid-to-fail attitude probably isn't going to get you anywhere at all. If you really "fell in love" with Oxford, as you suggest, you shouldn't have to ask whether it's worth it to apply. So yea probably not mate.
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    (Original post by Cowtheduck)
    You might find this thread useful to refer to for an indicative grade profile. You will note that 2 individuals obtained offers with a single C at AS-Level.
    Fun reading, thanks for this

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    (Original post by JohanGRK)
    Fun reading, thanks for this

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    It's a pretty troll thread to be honest. LNAT stands out to me as being the least relevant factor in admission outcomes. Some guy got shortlisted with an LNAT score of 10 - the next lowest shortlist being 13, and the lowest offer being 14. Some guy also got an LNAT score of 2. How the f*** does that happen? You can literally put a random answer for every question and statistically you'll still get 1 in 4... or about 10 out of 42. Also 6 people got 34 (the highest being 35) and out of those 6, 3 of them didn't get offers. Weird.
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    (Original post by Cowtheduck)
    It's a pretty troll thread to be honest. LNAT stands out to me as being the least relevant factor in admission outcomes. Some guy got shortlisted with an LNAT score of 10 - the next lowest shortlist being 13, and the lowest offer being 14. Some guy also got an LNAT score of 2. How the f*** does that happen? You can literally put a random answer for every question and statistically you'll still get 1 in 4... or about 10 out of 42. Also 6 people got 34 (the highest being 35) and out of those 6, 3 of them didn't get offers. Weird.
    I'm guessing that the people who got terrible LNAT scores compensated for them in some other way? But yeah those ultra-low scores were fun to see. Maybe they were so low that the admissions people were like "something's wrong here - they can't have been that bad!"

    Not surprised at the rejections of those in the 30+ range. The LNAT MCQ is just one assessment out of many. The applicants may have stumbled on any other step of the process.

    Btw, since the OP is applying for 2019, it's worth adding that LSE has started requiring the LNAT. Should be fun to compare how it assesses it, and what the average offerholder scores look like compared to UCL and Oxford.
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    (Original post by JohanGRK)
    Fun reading, thanks for this

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    The FOI responses were sufficiently amusing to warrant a perusal. Reminded me of an ex-GF messaging you on eBay after you've blocked her off all social "can we just talk? PLEASE?!"

    Lowest you see with an offer is 14, with a 65 on the LNAT essay. I.e. "at a level one would expect of a candidate with a strong chance of obtaining a place". The lowest you see with a sub-65 essay, i.e. "at a level one would expect of candidate with some chance of obtaining a place", is 18 on the LNAT. What's amusing to me is that people got 34 on the LNAT and yet managed to get 55 on the essay (he got an offer, mind). There was another with 34 and a 68 who didn't. What this tells me is pretty much what we already knew: your application will be considered on the whole and the higher your LNAT the better chance you have.*

    The LNAT score of 2 is accompanied by an essay score of 35. My guess would be that the candidate was a non-fluent English speaker.

    *You do see people high 20s and mid-20s getting 71/70 and still not getting a place. There's a mush who had "A*A*A*A*A*A*" A-Level predictions who wasn't even shortlisted, nor were his two "A*A*A*A*A*" compatriots. You see much more range with predicted grades getting offers, although the largest cluster of applicants getting offers are A*A*A+.
 
 
 

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