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Are Male Early Years (Nursery - Reception) Teachers Acceptable? watch

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    I just read this article from BBC news.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-43386250

    I remember there being a male member of staff at my nursery and he was quite a funny guy who made activities more enjoyable. Also my reception teacher was male and I still think he was one of the best teachers I have ever had.

    I have heard this debate many times growing up, my mum was a child minder and was very much for men being part of early education and many times I heard her complain about the stigma against men in the profession. I think one case i remember that made her quite mad was a male teacher gave a 5 year old girl a hug after she fell and cut her knee and was crying, a female teacher saw and reported the male teacher for acting inappropriately and he lost his job.

    Whats your opinion on men in the profession?

    Do you think that they are viewed/treated differently or held to higher standards than women?

    Would you be OK with a male nursery teacher for your child?
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    I think men should be allowed in the profession, certainly; as with anyone, it should be subject to background checks etc, but I don't think their gender need play a part in the decision. I'm not sure that they're held to a higher standard than women, but they certainly are viewed differently, at least as things stand now.

    I'd be fine with a male nursery teacher for my (hypothetical) child though, I don't think it would be any different to a woman nursery teacher.
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    (Original post by shadowdweller)
    I think men should be allowed in the profession, certainly; as with anyone, it should be subject to background checks etc, but I don't think their gender need play a part in the decision. I'm not sure that they're held to a higher standard than women, but they certainly are viewed differently, at least as things stand now.

    I'd be fine with a male nursery teacher for my (hypothetical) child though, I don't think it would be any different to a woman nursery teacher.
    Hi, yeah sorry wasn't quite sure what to go for when i said higher standard, i guess viewed more critically would be a better description?
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    I didn't even know people were weary of male teachers of this age group? Why should their gender make any difference? If I had a kid, I'd be more concerned about the quality of their learning environment rather than the gender of the teacher.
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    (Original post by TomW624)
    Hi, yeah sorry wasn't quite sure what to go for when i said higher standard, i guess viewed more critically would be a better description?
    Oh I understand what you mean - I don't think they necessarily are on an inherent basis, but I do agree that some people seem to view them considerably more critically, based solely on the actions of others.
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    Yes, I think having men working with younger kids is especially important for those without positive male role models in their home lives. It shouldn’t just be women, there should be more of a balance imo.

    Since it’s not common for men to work with primary kids, parents are more likely to be uncomfortable with their intentions. It’s sad that people think the only reason a man would want to work with young kids is perversion.
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    (Original post by Know Your Enemy)
    I didn't even know people were weary of male teachers of this age group? Why should their gender make any difference? If I had a kid, I'd be more concerned about the quality of their learning environment rather than the gender of the teacher.
    Apparently people are very wary of them. I agree with @shadowdweller that if proper background checks have been carried out gender should have no bearing. Unfortunately i think that even if the most stringent background checks are carried out on a male teacher who teaches toddlers some parents will still have a prejudice against them.
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    (Original post by cat_mac)
    Yes, I think having men working with younger kids is especially important for those without positive male role models in their home lives. It shouldn’t just be women, there should be more of a balance imo.

    Since it’s not common for men to work with primary kids, parents are more likely to be uncomfortable with their intentions. It’s sad that people think the only reason a man would want to work with young kids is perversion.
    Yeah it sucks.

    One of the problems is that the children need a caring role model at the early stages which for some reason some people don't believe men can be and then if they are caring then it's met with scrutiny.

    I think from the teachers i had before high school the few male teachers i had were more caring than the female ones, but that's just personal experience.
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    One of my friends had a male teacher in first school
    There’s one now at the school
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    I'm male, and I'm applying for an Early Years PGCE this Autumn - so I'm not too happy about that news article! From what it's worth I've not seen that reflected in my experiences. Two of the Reception teachers I've worked with have been male, at different schools, and one taught Reception for 10 years without issue before then moving to Year 2 simply for change.
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    (Original post by doctorwhofan98)
    I'm male, and I'm applying for an Early Years PGCE this Autumn - so I'm not too happy about that news article! From what it's worth I've not seen that reflected in my experiences. Two of the Reception teachers I've worked with have been male, at different schools, and one taught Reception for 10 years without issue before then moving to Year 2 simply for change.
    I guess peoples view on it could depend where about the school is. Also given the number of male early years teachers cited in the article I'm not surprised its not a widely discussed thing, but as more and more men move to similar roles the discussion will grow and unfortunately some hardliners will rally against the men even though, i assume like you and the ones you've worked with, they are more than capable.
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    It's a lot more rare to see. It's not an issue isolated to Early Years. Primary Education sees a very big gap between number of men and women in the job, and for that reason you tend to see men rising faster, and admitted onto training courses more easily. It seems that the younger age group you get, the professionals working with them are more likely to be female.

    I'd put it down to very old connotations between infancy and the maternal figure.
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    (Original post by cat_mac)
    Yes, I think having men working with younger kids is especially important for those without positive male role models in their home lives. It shouldn’t just be women, there should be more of a balance imo.

    Since it’s not common for men to work with primary kids, parents are more likely to be uncomfortable with their intentions. It’s sad that people think the only reason a man would want to work with young kids is perversion.
    I totally agree.
    Background checks are done for all teachers before they take up the job anyway (whatever their gender). I think that there should be more male teachers, and they should be employed on their ability, not their gender.
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    Well here in India, we can see a lot of Male Art and Craft teachers. Even many schools hire male music instructors for the reception days. Especially with public schools meant exclusively for boys, the practice is more.
    Apart from that, we can also find some male teachers (after going through strict screenings obviously). But yet again I would convey that the ratio is pretty less in numbers among co-education schools.

    A gradual change is taking place. But the encouragement should be more.
 
 
 

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