Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I really want to be a doctor.
    I have to start from the beginning with my GCSEs. I’m 30 with two children.
    I worry I’ve left it too late, I worry I’ll get to uni and struggle with Mum guilt not seeing my children and give it up.
    What’s full time med school like ? Is it 9-5 ? My youngest will be four when I get to full time study. Maybe five. So they will both be at school full time. Will I miss a lot ? Has anyone else juggled this ?
    Thanks for help.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    • PS Reviewer
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Very Important Poster
    PS Reviewer
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by Hayleymalayley)
    I really want to be a doctor.
    I have to start from the beginning with my GCSEs. I’m 30 with two children.
    I worry I’ve left it too late, I worry I’ll get to uni and struggle with Mum guilt not seeing my children and give it up.
    What’s full time med school like ? Is it 9-5 ? My youngest will be four when I get to full time study. Maybe five. So they will both be at school full time. Will I miss a lot ? Has anyone else juggled this ?
    Thanks for help.
    Lots of people have kids while at med school and there is support available but you have to be prepared for the fact that you will miss things and need to have a good support system in place. Med school and being a doctor most certainly isn't 9-5 till you finish your foundation years which is 2 years after med school.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alleycat393)
    Lots of people have kids while at med school and there is support available but you have to be prepared for the fact that you will miss things and need to have a good support system in place. Med school and being a doctor most certainly isn't 9-5 till you finish your foundation years which is 2 years after med school.
    Thanks for the reply.
    I totally know being a doctor, a foundation doctor and even once you’re in a clinical setting isn’t 9-5 but surely the majority of university days are spent 9-5 in lectures and such?
    I guess I’ll have to find out a typical schedule for uni days and see if I could work round that. I have zero support to help with the children. They would have to go to before and after school clubs as their dad works full time.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    • PS Reviewer
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Very Important Poster
    PS Reviewer
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by Hayleymalayley)
    Thanks for the reply.
    I totally know being a doctor, a foundation doctor and even once you’re in a clinical setting isn’t 9-5 but surely the majority of university days are spent 9-5 in lectures and such?
    I guess I’ll have to find out a typical schedule for uni days and see if I could work round that. I have zero support to help with the children. They would have to go to before and after school clubs as their dad works full time.
    It doesn't always work like that unfortunately. Visit the unis and specifically ask about people who have kids and how timetables and childcare support works if it exists.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks I will.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    As you’ve realised, once you finish uni you will not be working 9-5s but shift work for at least the next 2 years with no real control over the Rota. With kids, you wil most likely be accommodated where you get longer notice about change in shifts and will be able to stay in the same hospital.

    In the first 2 years of uni you will be mainly 9-5. 3-5, when you are out on placements are not. For example, surgeries may run late and you will be there, or you may have to be there early for consent etc. If in A&E you may be staying late, or be required to do a couple of nights.
    For example, I’m in my obs and gynae placement. We have to get a certain amount of natural deliveries signed off and this can involve being there a long time - I was at ward round at 8.30am and wasn’t leaving till 8pm after only getting one delivery all day.
    If we have theatres, we are on the ward before 8am to get consent as otherwise we can’t be in the theatre for surgery. We leave when the surgeons finished, which can be very variable.

    However other students with kids manage ok, they arrange flexible childcare or have people who can look after kids if they are staying late unexpected etc.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alleycat393)
    Lots of people have kids while at med school and there is support available but you have to be prepared for the fact that you will miss things and need to have a good support system in place. Med school and being a doctor most certainly isn't 9-5 till you finish your foundation years which is 2 years after med school.
    Even after foundation, being a doctor is rarely a 9-5 job. Core medical, core psych, core surgery or GP training (which are the pathways that cover the majority of trainees post-foundation years) will all include plenty of weekends and night shifts. Registrars (the stage that generally comes after core training) will also work nights and weekends. Consultants in most specialties will also have to work some weekends and nights, although at least the nights will sometimes be non-residential (requiring them to answer the phone, but not necessarily come in to work). GPs often don't work nights or weekends, but still definitely work outside the hours of 9-5. Even the few clinic-based specialties (GUM, dermatology) will often run evening clinics.

    For the OP: medical school is not necessarily 9-5. During your degree, the pre-clinical years (generally the first two or three years depending on where you go to university) tend to be 9-5ish. But during clinical years, you will often be on placement during the day and doing book work in the evening, especially in the run up to exams, which are frequent.

    This isn't to be all doom and gloom; plenty of people have children in medical school and foundation years, and cope just fine. And there can be flexibility with part-time work to help make childcare more manageable. But it would be a mistake to think that your training or career would be 9-5 any time soon, if ever.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Look into an access course rather than starting from gcses again, I think that is an option, as some unis have foundation courses for people with these access courses.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ahorey)
    As you’ve realised, once you finish uni you will not be working 9-5s but shift work for at least the next 2 years with no real control over the Rota. With kids, you wil most likely be accommodated where you get longer notice about change in shifts and will be able to stay in the same hospital.

    In the first 2 years of uni you will be mainly 9-5. 3-5, when you are out on placements are not. For example, surgeries may run late and you will be there, or you may have to be there early for consent etc. If in A&E you may be staying late, or be required to do a couple of nights.
    For example, I’m in my obs and gynae placement. We have to get a certain amount of natural deliveries signed off and this can involve being there a long time - I was at ward round at 8.30am and wasn’t leaving till 8pm after only getting one delivery all day.
    If we have theatres, we are on the ward before 8am to get consent as otherwise we can’t be in the theatre for surgery. We leave when the surgeons finished, which can be very variable.

    However other students with kids manage ok, they arrange flexible childcare or have people who can look after kids if they are staying late unexpected etc.
    Thank you that's a really great insight. I have no problem putting in the hours I just worry ill be a bad mum not seeing my kids much. There's always half terms and weekends I guess whilst I'm studying.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by *pitseleh*)
    Even after foundation, being a doctor is rarely a 9-5 job. Core medical, core psych, core surgery or GP training (which are the pathways that cover the majority of trainees post-foundation years) will all include plenty of weekends and night shifts. Registrars (the stage that generally comes after core training) will also work nights and weekends. Consultants in most specialties will also have to work some weekends and nights, although at least the nights will sometimes be non-residential (requiring them to answer the phone, but not necessarily come in to work). GPs often don't work nights or weekends, but still definitely work outside the hours of 9-5. Even the few clinic-based specialties (GUM, dermatology) will often run evening clinics.

    For the OP: medical school is not necessarily 9-5. During your degree, the pre-clinical years (generally the first two or three years depending on where you go to university) tend to be 9-5ish. But during clinical years, you will often be on placement during the day and doing book work in the evening, especially in the run up to exams, which are frequent.

    This isn't to be all doom and gloom; plenty of people have children in medical school and foundation years, and cope just fine. And there can be flexibility with part-time work to help make childcare more manageable. But it would be a mistake to think that your training or career would be 9-5 any time soon, if ever.
    Yeah I get all that. You answered my question which was are the first few years of uni pretty much that. Thanks for the insight.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hayleymalayley)
    Thank you that's a really great insight. I have no problem putting in the hours I just worry ill be a bad mum not seeing my kids much. There's always half terms and weekends I guess whilst I'm studying.
    Just to be annoying but the holidays start off great in first year, but every year they get less and less. At Christmas we had 2 weeks off and we get a week for Easter (no half term) and then our exams are start June. A week after our exams our elective placement starts so we get 4weeks total summer holiday this year.
    Last year our exams finished mid June and then started back mid August.

    You’ll have weekends though! But just don’t expect the traditional university holiday schedule. I had 16 weeks of placement last term with one week intro days at the start. No Halloween break either!
    I have 11 weeks of term still to go, plus a week at Easter...!
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: March 14, 2018
The home of Results and Clearing

2,495

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year

University open days

  1. Bournemouth University
    Clearing Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 22 Aug '18
  2. University of Buckingham
    Postgraduate Open Evening Postgraduate
    Thu, 23 Aug '18
  3. University of Glasgow
    All Subjects Undergraduate
    Tue, 28 Aug '18
Poll
How are you feeling about GCSE results day?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.